Lactation Conference 2017

Originally offered in 2017 at our GOLD Lactation Conference.It is a resource suitable for all skill levels and is a perfect fit for IBCLC's, Lactation Consultants, Nurses, Lactation Educators, Breastfeeding Counselors, Mother to Mother (Peer to Peer) Support Workers, Midwives, Physicians, Dietitians, Doulas, Childbirth Educators and anyone else working or studying within the maternal-child health industry.

$265.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 25.50   Access Time: 8 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (28):
Durations: 60 mins
Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE
Understanding Zika and Lyme and Breastfeeding
USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, BSc,CLE, CCCE, CLD, is an international speaker, pregnancy and breastfeeding specialist, consultant, and author. Laurel is the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever and the contributing author to Round the Circle. She loves to blend today's recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. She serves on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee, a Senior Advisor for CAPPA, and is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for more than two and a half decade and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into motherhood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

Objective 1: Identify main source of transmission of Zika and Lyme disease
Objective 2: Identify at least one potential risk during pregnancy or breastfeeding of Zika and Lyme disease
Objective 3: List three ways pregnant and breastfeeding mothers can protect themselves from Zika and Lyme disease

USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE
Abstract:

With the recent spread of the virus, Zika and the bacterial infection, Lyme Disease, many pregnant and breastfeeding families worry about the potential impact on their babies. There is a great deal of inaccurate information on the internet regarding these diseases that many parents encounter. Having good resources and current information on these emerging diseases is imperative for new families. This presentation will address transmission of the diseases, risks to babies prenatally and during breastfeeding, and precautions for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers to take.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 55 mins
Debbie Albert, PhD, BSN, IBCLC
RAYNAUDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment
USA Debbie Albert, PhD, BSN, IBCLC

Debbie Albert, PhD, BSN, IBCLC, is a full time lactation consultant at UC Davis Med Center--working with all facets of their lactation service; including maternity floor, level IV NICU, pediatrics, PICU, and Employee Breastfeeding Support Program. She is also a prenatal instructor with their patient education program, nursing staff educator, and chairs the UCD Breastfeeding Task Force and the UCD Breastfeeding Support Program Committee. She received an Employee Excellence Award June, 2013 and June, 2015, and a Nursing Excellence Award in May, 2016. In addition, UC Davis programs have received IBCLC Lactation Care Awards and Sacramento Coalition and California State Coalition Breastfeeding Awards. Debbie has lactation experience in Florida, Texas, and California. She is Member of the LEAARC Board, a member of ILCA’s Equity Committee, and UCD Status of Women Committee. She is married to Dan Albert for 33 years, and has two sons, Josh (28), and David (24).

Objective 1: Describe symptoms associated with general Raynaud’s syndrome (primary and secondary) and Raynaud’s of the nipple
Objective 2: Identify other ailments that are typically diagnosed in place of Raynaud’s syndrome
Objective 3: List non-medical and medical treatments for Raynaud’s

USA Debbie Albert, PhD, BSN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Raynauds is an illusive condition that tends to be confused with other conditions, misdiagnosed, and consequently rarely treated--causing the breastfeeding dyad to suffer. This program provides a review of the symptoms, medical and lactation resources, and clinical applications that facilitate most the effective treatment/comfort for the patient.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 61 mins
Zainab Yate, BSc, MSc, Doctoral Student
Breastfeeding / Nursing Aversion and Agitation (BAA) in breastfeeding mothers
GB Zainab Yate, BSc, MSc, Doctoral Student

Zainab's background in academia is in Medical Ethics & Law (Imperial College, MSc), and she is researching her doctorate in Bioethics. Her working background is in Public Health and commissioning with the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK. She is Alt. Vice Chair and named qualitative lead of north London Research Ethics Committee, with the Health Research Authority in the UK (HRA). She is also a member of the Kings College London Research Ethics Governance and Policy Committee (KCL). She has been a breastfeeding peer supporter with the NHS for a number of years and is the owner author of the resource site for mothers and healthcare practitioners on Breastfeeding / Nursing Aversion and Agitation (BAA), www.breastfeedingaversion.com, where she researches and writes for the viewers of this site, to try to understand what BAA is and why it arises.

Objective 1: Describe the phenomenon of Breastfeeding/Nursing Aversion is, as experienced by mothers
Objective 2: Discuss experiences Breastfeeding/Nursing Aversion when breastfeeding infants
Objective 3: Explain how to help mothers who experience Breastfeeding/Nursing Aversion

GB Zainab Yate, BSc, MSc, Doctoral Student
Abstract:

Aversion to breastfeeding or agitation while breastfeeding is known to occur in some women who breastfeed while pregnant, or who tandem feed a newborn and a toddler. However, it is a little researched area, and the paucity of published literature around breastfeeding aversion and agitation reveals a significant gap in the literature. My presentation presents the findings of an exploratory online survey that sheds light on what appears to be a commonly experienced phenomenon of aversion and agitation whilst breastfeeding, which varies in form, severity and duration. BAA is characterised by feelings of anger or rage, a skin crawling sensation and an urge to remove the suckling infant, but can also be feelings of agitation and irritability whilst the infant is latched. Mothers who experience BAA still continue to breastfeed, but have feelings of guilt and shame about BAA and are often confused about having feelings of BAA. Research is needed to understand the reasons for BAA, its causes, triggers and strategies to minimize the experience in breastfeeding mothers.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 63 mins
Dr. Satish Tiwari, M D (Pediatrics), LLB
Legal and Ethical issues in Infant Feeding
India Dr. Satish Tiwari, M D (Pediatrics), LLB

Dr. Satish Tiwari has worked as Professor of Pediatrics for 5- 6 years, and was responsible for the formation of the Indian Medico-Legal Ethics Association (Founder President), and the Human Milk Banking Association (India). He is a recipient of the Dr Nirmala Kesaree Oration 2012 and Dr NB Kumta Award 2015 for outstanding work in IYCF. He is a trainer in Human Lactation, breastfeeding, human milk banking, medico-legal issues etc. He has National, International publications and has provided editorial services for: a Textbook on Medico-legal Issues, Feeding Fundamentals, International J Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant & Nutrition, and the Journal Indian Medico-Legal Ethics Association. He is Founder Editor-in-chief for the New Indian Journal Pediatrics. He is Founder Secretary Medico-legal group, Founder Secretary IYCF chapter IAP. He worked as President BPNI Maharashtra 04-06, Member Central Coordination Committee of BPNI (New Delhi) 06-08 and National Executive Indian Academy Pediatrics 07. He was a Postgraduate & Undergraduate examiner in Pediatrics and has been invited as a Guest Speaker on Infant feeding, breastfeeding, Medico-legal issues, HIV, Behavioral problems, etc.

Objective 1: Discuss various laws & enactments related to Breastfeeding & Infant feeding
Objective 2: Assess ethical issues related to Child Nutrition
Objective 3: Describe various legal & ethical ways to promote, protect and support breastfeeding & child nutrition

India Dr. Satish Tiwari, M D (Pediatrics), LLB
Abstract:

Food/nutrition is a basic need of individuals. Unethical, uncontrolled marketing practices have added to age-old confusions and misconceptions. Products are subtly portrayed as essential and convenient to “modern parents”.
Since the time that WHO/UNICEF has declared an International Code, many WHA resolutions have been resolved. Convention on the Rights of the Child accepts the right to enjoy a highest attainable standard. Innocenti Declaration was adopted on Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding.
It is important to support woman, by enacting legislation and adopting its enforcement and by providing adequate paid maternity benefits/leave.
The Indian government has enacted the Infant Milk Substitutes, Feeding Bottles & Infant Foods Act.
People should be vigilant enough to realize that legislations are not merely pieces of paper. Health workers have a moral and ethical responsibility to provide health education and report violations by becoming a “Watch-guard”.
Even after many legislations, some manufacturers are behaving as if these recommendations don’t affect them and have ignored or just given lip services. Health workers, and the general population has a great influence on decision making. There is need to follow laws in spirit rather than words.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 67 mins
Cindy Leclerc, RN IBCLC
Jana Stockham, RN IBCLC
Preventing the Plunge: Why the First 2 Weeks are Crucial for Breastfeeding Duration.
can Cindy Leclerc, RN IBCLC
       Jana Stockham, RN IBCLC

Cindy Leclerc and Jana Stockham are Registered Nurses and IBCLCs with over 20 years experience helping families get started with breastfeeding. In addition to hands on care, Cindy and Jana use technology to support families through their website (cindyandjana.com), online prenatal breastfeeding classes (simplybreastfeeding.ca) and iPhone app, NuuNest. Cindy is a strong believer in mother-to-mother support, helping to facilitate breastfeeding and postpartum depression support groups. She is intrigued by all things online and actively uses social media to promote breastfeeding. Jana has been trained as a Baby Friendly assessor and helped to coordinate the first Baby Friendly designation in Saskatchewan. She has a passion to help families with new babies and facilitates a group for breastfeeding moms.

Objective 1: List the 4 most common reasons women discontinue breastfeeding in the first weeks of breastfeeding
Objective 2: Identify 3 strategies to help women meet their breastfeeding goals
Objective 3: List 2 breastfeeding myths that may undermine breastfeeding
Objective 4: Identify online resources providing evidence based breastfeeding information

can Cindy Leclerc, RN IBCLC
       Jana Stockham, RN IBCLC
Abstract:

The majority of women begin breastfeeding at birth. Within the first 6 weeks, however, breastfeeding rates fall dramatically. To help women hang in with breastfeeding beyond the first weeks, we must first understand why they struggle. Learn what the research is saying and what you can do in your practice to help women meet their breastfeeding goals. IBCLC’s who specialize in the early weeks of breastfeeding will share case examples based on over 20 years of working with breastfeeding families.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 59 mins
When Tears Flow and Milk Doesn’t: Support Through Breastfeeding Grief

Amy Barron Smolinski holds an MA from Union Institute and University, where her thesis explored re-emerging Sacred Feminine manifestations in the lives of contemporary women. She is the Executive Director of Mom2Mom Global, a network of breastfeeding peer support, education, and advocacy for military families. She works with breastfeeding dyads in a variety of settings, from inpatient postpartum and NICU to home visits, telephone, and online consulting as an Advanced Lactation Consultant and Certified Lactation Counselor. Supporting breastfeeding families has shown her how each parent’s breastfeeding journey with each of her children is a reclamation of her connection to her inner wisdom and power. Amy is an actress, director, and professional voice artist in Germany, where she resides with her husband and four sons, all of whom breastfed to self-weaning.

Objective 1: Describe the impact of the role lactation supporters play in the narrative of breastfeeding grief
Objective 2: Identify bereavement counseling techniques to offer comfort and reassurance to a parent experiencing breastfeeding grief
Objective 3: Identify techniques for self-awareness and self-care for the lactation supporter

Abstract:

Some women who initiate breastfeeding will not meet their duration goals. There are a number of factors that contribute to undesired weaning. For a woman who ceases breastfeeding before she desires to do so, it can be devastating. For the lactation professional or peer supporter, this can also feel like failure. Grief counseling and ethical principles are applicable to supporting a mother grieving the loss of the breastfeeding relationship she desired. This presentation uses case studies to address the questions of how breastfeeding supporters ethically and compassionately support mothers who end their breastfeeding journey before they wish to, how lactation professionals and peer supporters can manage our own feelings in these situations, and what are the ramifications of these cases as we continue to share accurate breastfeeding information in the face of media-driven culture in which infant feeding is loaded with guilt, shame, and fear.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 66 mins
Alexandra Walker, BSN, MA, RN, IBCLC, RLC
Chasing the Butterfly: Understanding How the Thyroid Gland Impacts Breastfeeding
USA Alexandra Walker, BSN, MA, RN, IBCLC, RLC

Alex has been a lactation consultant in the Washington, DC area since 2010. In addition to running her private practice, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Lactation Consultants, Alex cares for breastfeeding moms and babies at Hirsch Pediatrics in Rockville, MD. After earning her master's in English Literature and teaching for several years, Alex met two extraordinary people that inspired her to enter the field of lactation: her daughters. Alex has worked at Inova Fairfax Hospital and Sibley Memorial Hospital as an in-patient lactation consultant. In 2015, she graduated summa cum laude from the University of Maryland Baltimore School of Nursing with a Bachelors of Science in Nursing. Alex is committed to increasing awareness for impaired mammary organ development (IMOD) and impaired mammary organ function (IMOF).

Objective 1: Describe normal thyroid function and how/why this is altered during stages of pregnancy and postpartum
Objective 2: Recognize the signs and symptoms of thyroid disorders in a lactating mother
Objective 3: Recognize the difference between normal and abnormal thyroid lab values during pregnancy and postpartum, as well as understanding their significance
Objective 4: Name at least three ways a mother could support a euthyroid state through dietary and/or herbal methods

USA Alexandra Walker, BSN, MA, RN, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

Often overlooked and as elusive as the butterfly it resembles, the thyroid gland may lurk behind a number of breastfeeding difficulties, including low-supply, over-supply, and overt lactation failure. Recent research has revealed that thyroid disorders during pregnancy and postpartum are more common than previously thought. A substantial amount of our current professional discourse centers around tongue-tie, which occurs in anywhere from 4.2%-10.7% of babies, while thyroid disorders in lactating women may in fact be more prevalent than tongue tie, affecting anywhere from 6.7%-13.3% of women in the postpartum period. Even more alarming is that as many 50-80% of these cases may be missed by a woman’s healthcare provider. During this presentation, you will gain a basic understanding of how the thyroid gland functions and the various ways in which a dysfunctional thyroid can adversely affect lactation. You will also learn which signs and symptoms warrant a referral to a primary health care provider. We will review the latest evidence-based thyroid hormone reference values appropriate for a woman during pregnancy and postpartum so that, if your patient does undergo testing, you will feel confident discussing those results with her. Finally, we will discuss some herbal and dietary recommendations for improving thyroid function.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
Paulina Erices, BS, IBCLC, RLC
From the NICU to the home: mother’s experiences
USA Paulina Erices, BS, IBCLC, RLC

Paulina Erices is the mother of three children, a bilingual Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and Maternal Child Health Specialist for the Jefferson County Health Department in Colorado. She is originally from Chile and has lived in the US for almost 15 years. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from PennState and is currently completing her Masters of Science in Leadership and Organizations from the University of Denver. She has been a La Leche League Leader for 12 years where she has held different mother and Leader support roles across the US. She is a member of several groups working to improve child health and well-being, including the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership, the NICU Consortium, and the Community Leaders in Health Equity. Paulina's goal is to elevate and empower the voices of the community to effectively improve systems of care through advocacy and policy. Paulina lives in Littleton, Colorado where she spends her free time birding with her family and training her dog Aussie.

Paulina E. is a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and Maternal Child Health Specialist.

Objective 1: Summarize three areas of concern reported by mothers regarding their transition from the NICU to home
Objective 2: To interpret the role of the lactation consultant as described by mothers
Objective 3: To identify protective factors in the mother-baby relationship as they transition from the NICU to the home
Objective 4: To discuss protective interventions to support families transitioning from the NICU to home

USA Paulina Erices, BS, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

Lactation consultants would benefit from expanding their understanding of the impact of the NICU stay on the family; moreover, they would benefit from identifying the essential role they could play in assisting families to accomplish a positive, healthy, and smooth transition home.
Despite continuing efforts to reduce prematurely worldwide, a significant number of infants are born too early or in a fragile medical condition. Many of these infants experience a lengthy stay at the NICU. Lactation support varies across facilities, but families, especially mothers, develop strong connections with their lactation consultant. As one of their most consistent providers in the NICU, the lactation consultant has the opportunity to recognize families’ need for continuing support after discharge and strategies to protect the breastfeeding relationship, attachment, and mental health in the long term.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 61 mins
Resolving Cultural Conflicts in Nighttime Breastfeeding and Infant Sleep

Cecilia Tomori, PhD, MA, is a Hungarian American anthropologist with postdoctoral training in public health. Dr. Tomori’s research examines the sociocultural aspects of health, illness and inequality with a focus on breastfeeding. Dr. Tomori’s recent book, Nighttime Breastfeeding: An American Cultural Dilemma (Berghahn Books, 2014), investigates cultural controversies surrounding breastfeeding and infant sleep using anthropological, historical, and feminist perspectives. Dr. Tomori has presented her research at numerous conferences for a variety of audiences. She is currently a Research Associate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Objective 1: Describe the cultural origins of nighttime infant sleep recommendations
Objective 2: Identify key conflicts between infant sleep and breastfeeding recommendations
Objective 3: Discuss how parents negotiate these conflicts
Objective 4: Describe an integrated anthropological approach to nighttime breastfeeding and infant sleep

Abstract:

Nighttime breastfeeding and proximate mother-infant sleep play a crucial role in sustaining lactation but present challenges for parents in settings where solitary infant sleep is the norm, and bedsharing is viewed as controversial and inherently dangerous. While separate parent-child sleep arrangements are a relatively recent cultural invention, they have become the dominant cultural norm, which also shapes medical infant sleep guidance in the U.S. and other similar settings. Recent breastfeeding promotion efforts, however, conflict with these cultural and medical imperatives for separate sleep. As more parents breastfeed, they find themselves falling asleep next to their babies. Some may fall asleep on unsafe surfaces in their attempt to avoid bedsharing, while others regularly bedshare in secret to avoid social stigma and other repercussions. To ensure both safety and wellbeing for infants and families, an integrated approach to nighttime breastfeeding and infant sleep will be recommended that incorporates evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 56 mins
1000 Days in Gap City: Exploring the Relationship Between the Breastfeeding Gap and the Word Gap

Dia has written and/or edited over a dozen books for adults and children. Her passions in life include promoting the concepts and practices of attachment parenting, breastfeeding and safe infant sleep. She is founder and president of two publishing houses—Platypus Media and Science, Naturally! Their books have won numerous awards and have been translated into Spanish, Dutch, Hebrew, Chinese, Russian, Turkish, French and Korean. Dia has led workshops at healthcare, education and parenting conferences across the country. She is the mother of three adult children and lives in Washington, DC.

Objective 1: Describe the phenomenon of Breastfeeding / Nursing Aversion is, as experienced by mothers
Objective 2: Discuss the advantages of a breastfed baby over a formula-fed baby in early literacy
Objective 3: Describe how a breastfeeding support worker can promote literacy

Abstract:

Each child is born with the same capacity to learn as the next, however not every child lives up to this potential. Can we tackle this ever-widening gap at the beginning of a child’s life? We can by focusing on the word gap, the differential in the number of words children in different socio-economic groups hear in the first 1000 days; which equals over 30 million words a year. We will explore not only different ways healthcare professionals can help families overcome the word gap, but also demonstrate the very real connection between the word gap and the breastfeeding gap.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 65 mins
Lori J. Isenstadt, IBCLC, CCE, CBD
The original foster-mother were wet nurses
USA Lori J. Isenstadt, IBCLC, CCE, CBD

Lori J. Isenstadt, IBCLC, CCE, CBD, began her IBCLC career in 2 large hospitals and a local breastfeeding clinic. In 2007, she opened her practice, All About Breastfeeding, offering private consultations, and breastfeeding classes. Her expertise ranges from basic breastfeeding through the most complicated of breastfeeding challenges. In the last 30 years, Lori has taught breastfeeding classes to over 8000 parents where she focuses on what they should expect in the early days of breastfeeding. Lori is a member of Toastmasters International and enjoys speaking about mothering and breastfeeding. Lori is the host of All About Breastfeeding, a podcast where she interviews mothers, authors, researchers and physicians about topics related to breastfeeding. Lori believes that breastfeeding is a family affair. To help support her mission to educate families as well as corporations and business owners about breastfeeding, she has recently released the most comprehensive audio breastfeeding masterclass. She has produced over 300 shows many of which focus on breastfeeding educational topics. On a personal note, Lori resides in Phoenix, AZ is married to Alan for 38 years and is the mother of three adult children. Lori can be reached by email: aabreastfeeding@hotmail.com and website: www.aabreastfeeding.com

Objective 1: Describe the phenomenon of Breastfeeding/Nursing Aversion is, as experienced by mothers
Objective 2: Describe the history and development of alternative feeding instruments
Objective 3: Explain why more mothers are showing an interest in wet/cross nursing
Objective 4: Explain why and how we can best support mothers who want to or who are practicing wet/cross nursing

USA Lori J. Isenstadt, IBCLC, CCE, CBD
Abstract:

The historical evolution of infant feeding includes direct breastfeeding, wet nursing and bottlefeeding. Before the invention of bottles/ vessels to feed babies, wet nursing was the safest and most common alternative way to feed a baby. As bottles and nipples were developed, scientific advancement improved formulas, wet nursing fell out of favor. It gradually went from being widely accepted as the most normal way to feed a baby to where we currently are as a modern society. It is negatively seen as being weird and risky behavior. When mothers do not breastfeed or give their babies human milk, they use formula to feed their babies. Given the current knowledge of lack of complete nutrition formula has more mothers are showing an interest and actively pursuing wet/cross nursing. This presentation will help us understand the history of wet nursing and offer reasons to support, advocate and be encouraging to mothers who want to participate in the practice of wet/cross nursing.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 64 mins
Barbara D. Robertson, BA, MA, IBCLC, RLC
Breastfeeding: Baby’s First Milestone
United States Barbara D. Robertson, BA, MA, IBCLC, RLC

Barbara D. Robertson, IBCLC, has been an educator for over 29 years. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education in 1988 and her Master’s in Education in 1995. Barbara left teaching elementary students in 1995 to raise her two children. Barbara is now the Director of The Breastfeeding Center of Ann Arbor. Barbara has developed a 90 hour professional lactation training, a 20 hour course which fulfills the "Baby Friendly" requirements, and is a speaker for hire on a wide variety of topics. Barbara volunteered for the United States Lactation Consultation Association as the Director of Professional Development for 4.5 years. She just retired as Associate Editor for Clinical Lactation, a journal she helped create for USLCA. Barbara has free podcasts, a blog, and Youtube videos which can all be found on her website bfcaa.com. She loves working with mothers and babies, helping them with breastfeeding problems in whatever way she can.

Objective 1: The participant will be able to state one other milestone for young children and three possible support systems that are in place to help mitigate any delays in reaching that milestone
Objective 2: The participant will be able to differentiate between mother based, infant based, and dyad based barriers to successful breastfeeding
Objective 3: The participant will be able to provide three examples of mother based barriers to successful breastfeeding and possible solutions
Objective 4: The participant will be able state five reasons, that are infant based, that could impact successful breastfeeding and possible solutions

United States Barbara D. Robertson, BA, MA, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

Breastfeeding is widely acknowledged as being the healthiest way to feed an infant for at least two years. In the United States of America, the CDC 2014 Breastfeeding Report Card states that 79.2% of mothers start out breastfeeding. However, as the babies get older, these numbers plummet. Only 49.4% of these babies are receiving any breastmilk by 6 months of age. We know from the literature that the primary reasons mothers stop breastfeeding in these early months are pain and worrying about their breastmilk supply. These are problems with solutions if the proper support is in place. Why is this support lacking? Is it because for all of the talk, “breast is best”, the importance of breastfeeding is not really valued? What if successful breastfeeding was reframed into a milestone? Baby’s first milestone? This presentation will explore other milestones, walking, talking, and learning to read, and what happens if babies and young children are not reaching these markers in a reasonable time frame. What support systems are in place to help these milestones be achieved if babies are faltering? The possible reasons for a baby not being able to breastfeeding and possible solutions will then be examined from the lens of having proper support systems in place.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 62 mins
Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA
Sending Reports: What’s in it for IBCLCs?
USA Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA

Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Registered Lactation Consultant. She is the owner of Sound Beginnings, which provides in-home consultations and education on lactation, babywearing, and more. Her background as a birth and postpartum doula, and childbirth, newborn, and parenting educator, inform her compassionate and evidence-based support of new families in the greater Seattle area. Joy holds a Master of Arts in Cultural Studies, graduate certificate in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, and two Bachelors degrees from the University of Washington. She serves as adjunct faculty at the Simkin Center for Allied Birth Vocations at Bastyr University where she created the Breastfeeding for Doulas course. Joy is passionate about her family, social justice, and continuing education.

Objective 1: Describe the ethical considerations of reporting accurately and completely to other members of the healthcare team
Objective 2: Identify at least three (3) benefits to the client of the IBCLC writing and sending reports to health care providers
Objective 3: Identify at least three (3) benefits to the IBCLC of writing and sending reports to health care providers

USA Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA
Abstract:

Most lactation professionals love client interactions, but only send reports to health care providers out of a sense of duty. But writing and sending reports to our client’s health care providers can be more just an administrative task. Yes, it complies with IBLCE’s Code of Ethics to “Principle 4: Report accurately and completely to other members of the healthcare team” but it can also increase collaboration, improve client outcomes, and grow your practice.
This presentation seeks to reframe the process of writing and sending reports from a dreaded task to a clinical, ethical, and holistic way of supporting our clients while positively positioning ourselves as allied health professionals. Beyond the ethics (yes or no) and practicalities ("S.O.A.P." or not), a report to a health care provider is a source of communication about the consultation as well as marketing about your clinical skill, role in the client’s lactation experience, and lactation practice. With a combination of the why and how, this presentation outlines the ways in which reports to health care providers can be beneficial to the client, the health care provider, and the IBCLC, as well as devoting some time to specific strategies that lactation consultants can implement to streamline the process of sending reports so that we can get to the next client.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 62 mins
Judy Terwilliger, RN, CMT, FBT
How B.E.S.T. (Basic Evaluation of Structural Tension) Relates to Breast©
USA Judy Terwilliger, RN, CMT, FBT


Judy Terwilliger is a Clinical RN Therapist with Pediatric experience for over 30 years. As lead therapist, researcher and educator in her proprietary form of functional mobility therapy (Functional Bowen™), she works with allied health care providers in the resolve of hidden structural barrier challenges for infants and children. Her collaborative, integrative team care approach sees many successes. She is committed to equipping families with the tools necessary in support of breastfeeding and enabling parents to participate in the resolve of their children’s structural challenges. She is a member of the National Society of Pediatric Nurses and was a nominee in the 2013 Clinical Excellence in Practice Award. She has been a speaker at the Northern California Placer County Breastfeeding Coalition, Imperial Valley Breastfeeding Summit and presented at the 2016 California Breastfeeding Coalition. Her professional memberships include: ABM Network, International Pediatric Integrative Medicine Network, IATP, and Breastfeeding USA. Judy is a licensed continuing education provider for the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork, California Board of Registered Nurses, The California Physical Therapy Association, and the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners.

Objective 1: Identify the correlation between higher than normal muscle tension (tonus) and the often structurally related breastfeeding challenges in the mother/infant dyad
Objective 2: Identify at least three predisposing factors in a “normal” pregnancy/delivery that can be identified as hidden barriers to functional mobility, enabling them to develop a plan of care that is more successful
Objective 3: Assess for structural manifestations (how they present), enabling parents in the instruction of self-help techniques to assist in resolves of these noted breastfeeding barriers
Objective 4: Identify when and where to make referral to professional resources to assist in the resolve of related breastfeeding barriers, utilizing a more comprehensive approach in breastfeeding support through integration of community resources

USA Judy Terwilliger, RN, CMT, FBT
Abstract:

This lecture/course is intended to familiarize the medical and allied health community in the recognition of the often-overlooked muscle-related structural barriers to breastfeeding. It provides a discussion of clues to the predisposing factors of these barriers and explores their affect on infant "functional mobility" as it relates to the achievement of successful breastfeeding. It is intended to improve the clinician’s assessment skills as they work with the mother/infant dyad in resolving breastfeeding difficulties/dysfunctions by development of insight into these often hidden and profoundly destructive structural manifestations. Recognition of these barriers with an emphasis on self-help techniques and when/who to refer parents/caregivers to for help, together with how to best meet their teaching/training needs across cultural barriers, is discussed. The ultimate purpose is the achievement of insight to improve the clinician’s evaluation process, better enabling them to promote, enhance and even save the breastfeeding experience of the families served.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 64 mins
Ruth Lucas, PhD, RNC, CLS
Infant feeding behaviors as a measure of neurodevelopment
USA Ruth Lucas, PhD, RNC, CLS

Ruth Lucas, PhD, RNC, CLS, received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from George Mason University (1986) and her Doctor of Philosophy of Science (2011) from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Based on 20 years of supporting women and infants to initiate breastfeeding, her research focuses on the biobehavioral mechanisms of breastfeeding, such as breast and nipple pain. Dr. Lucas and her team conducted a pilot randomized control trial (RCT) as part of the Center for Accelerating Precision Pain Self- Management (CAPPS-M) (P20NR016605). The pilot RCT tested the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a breastfeeding self-management (BSM) intervention for breast and nipple pain during breastfeeding and found the BSM intervention significantly reduced breast and nipple pain and is associated with pain sensitivity polymorphisms. Her published work describes management of pain during breastfeeding, a clinical indictor of infant breastfeeding behaviors, and a biomedical device to measure breastfeeding in real time.

Objective 1: Compare and contrast neurodevelopmental difference in infants’ latch and SuPPRT during nonnutritive sucking, breast and bottle feeding
Objective 2: Describe the relationship between infants’ latch and SuPPRT during bottle feeding and later neurodevelopment
Objective 3: Evaluate the evidence to consider infants’ latch and SuPPRT during breastfeeding to be a neurodevelopmental measure

USA Ruth Lucas, PhD, RNC, CLS
Abstract:

Infant feeding behavior is a complex neurodevelopment behavior. Infant feeding is compressed of infants’ latch and SuPPRT (sucking pressure pattern regulated over time) in both bottle and breastfeeding sessions. In preterm bottle feeding infants, the regulation of these two components is a measure of neurodevelopment. However, infants’ latch and SuPPRT in breastfeeding has not been explored. Dr. Lucas will review infants’ latch and SuPPRT during bottle and breastfeeding and explore how these differences make breastfeeding a more sensitive newborn neurodevelopmental measure. Finally, Dr. Lucas will propose why we should consider differences in infant latch and SuPPRT to be a neurodevelopmental infant measure.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 81 mins
Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Breastfeeding as a Public Health Issue: Do we Have the Right Approach?
United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. With a background in psychology, she has spent the last thirteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal influences upon infant feeding decisions in the first year. Her research seeks to understand how we can shift our perception of how babies are fed away from an individual mothering issue to a wider public health problem – with societal level solutions. Dr Brown has published over 60 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is a mother to three human children and three book babies: Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies, Why starting solids matters, and The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence. She is a regular blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

Objective 1: Describe the importance of responsive breastfeeding
Objective 2: Analyze the complexity of human decision making around health
Objective 3: Describe the influence of psychological, cultural, and societal barriers to responsive feeding and therefore breastfeeding duration

United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Abstract:

The majority of women should be able to breastfeed, but elements of their experience are ultimately stopping them from doing so. Breastfeeding works best when done responsively but many psychological, social and cultural factors work directly or more subtly against responsive feeding, meaning that many mothers experience difficulties with breastfeeding which can lead to premature weaning. These factors can include separation of mother and baby, a lack of understanding of breast milk production, public attitudes and wider pressures of motherhood to name a few. If we want to support mothers to breastfeed we must understand and target these wider factors to create a supportive breastfeeding environment. It is important however that our approaches to breastfeeding promotion and education are perceived positively by mothers in order for them to be effective. In this presentation I’ll be addressing the common barriers to breastfeeding and their impact, along with new research that looks at how mothers perceive common breastfeeding education messaging and what this research tells us about how we can change our approach to ensure our messages have the intended impact.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 72 mins
Infant and young child feeding in emergencies: Background, best practice, and what you can do

Karleen Gribble is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Western Sydney University and a member of the Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies Core Group. Her research interests include adoptive breastfeeding, long-term breastfeeding, child protection and breastfeeding, peer-to-peer milk sharing and the parenting and care of maltreated children. Karleen is active in research, policy development, advocacy and training in the areas of infant feeding in emergencies and the marketing of infant formula. She is also an Australian Breastfeeding Association Community Educator and Breastfeeding Counsellor.

Objective 1: Identify the challenges associated with IYCF-E
Objective 2: Identify the role of infant feeding specialists in emergencies
Objective 3: Identify how to prepare to support mothers in emergencies in their context

Abstract:

In any emergency, infants and young children are particularly vulnerable. Providing appropriate aid is vital to ensure that children have the best chance of surviving. This presentation will describe why infants and young children are at increased risk during times of crisis and outline how aid can support, or sometimes undermine the health of infants and young children. Detail on instruments to support appropriate infant and young child feeding in emergencies will be provided, along with information to assist participants in advocating for appropriate infant and young child feeding in emergencies in their context.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins

Brandi Gates is an every day, hard working bay area mother. She was born and raised in the diverse San Francisco, Bay Area. She has 3 beautiful daughters Azarriah, 12, Zaleeya, 6 and Ziyanna, 5. While earning her bachelors degree in sociology from Cal-State East Bay, she breastfed Azarriah for 19 months. She understands the time and energy it takes to exclusively breastfeed when there's many life obligations. While overcoming her own lactating difficulties with her daughter Azarriah, she realized how many bay area mothers have issues with breastfeeding and have no one to help. She became very passionate about breastfeeding and decided to pursue a career in helping and educating parents about lactation. She started working at an Alameda County WIC program. When she started there, she would support teen mothers with lactating challenges, going back to school and just being mothers at such a young age. After 3 years, her passion for helping mothers breastfeed grew. At the University of California, San Diego, Brandi earned her lactation consultant certificate in 2010 than went on to become an international board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) providing in-home lactation consulting, support and education for families throughout the East Bay. Her purpose and passion is to help create strong, healthy and happy families. Brandi is also the lead facilitator of the Breast Friends Mommy’s Group. The group is targeted towards women of color giving them a safe space for overcoming their breastfeeding challenges.

Objective 1: Describe effective ways to engage the African American Community around breastfeeding
Objective 2: Assess the importance of providing mentorship opportunities for the next generation of lactation support
Objective 3: Discuss how to outreach and share information about breastfeeding to community partners who promote encourage breastfeeding in your County

Abstract:

In Alameda County, Black women are initiating exclusive breastfeeding, but only ~15% remain breastfeeding by 3 months. For impoverished Black women, especially those in their teen years or who may have less than high school education, these numbers are even lower (9-12%). There is minimum breastfeeding support for black families.
When Black mothers in West Oakland who received peer and professional breastfeeding support through Breast Friends, exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months rose to 63%. This project expanded the Breast Friends model to East Oakland while also training 12 new peer counselors (including 1 father), 24 new group facilitators, and enhancing breastfeeding messaging in the California Black Infant Health program. The project surpassed our expectations. 5 out of the 12 trained peer counselors are now working in other community organizations as Community health outreach worker, peer counselors, doulas and WIC staff.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 64 mins
The Maternal-Child Microbiome or: The “Oro-boobular axis”

Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Objective 1: Identify the Maternal-Newborn Microbiome
Objective 2: Discuss the value of the microbiome and its effect on wellness
Objective 3: Identify implications of the microbiome and dysbiosis

Abstract:

Did you know that a mother who breastfeeds her child is more likely to “match” as an organ donor than a mother who does not breastfeed her child? How does that happen? The answer may lie in the Maternal-Newborn Microbiome, AKA “The Oro-boobular” axis. The scientific world is exploding with excitement over the discovery of the microbiome. While it appears clear that a suckling infant’s intestinal microbiome communicates with the mother’s lactocyte and perhaps beyond, little is known about the effects of this communication in practical terms. This presentation will review what is known and attempt to explain what it means, both now and in the future.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 68 mins
Supporting Breastfeeding People in the Legal System

Jake Marcus, J.D., is the nation’s foremost expert on breastfeeding law. Formerly Staff Attorney at a non-profit assisting survivors of domestic violence, her current private practice focuses on small businesses (including the business issues of health care practitioners such as IBCLCs and midwives) and healthcare. She was Politics Editor at Mothering magazine until it ceased publication in April of 2011. She was a member of the Legal Advisory Council to La Leche League International. She created and maintains BreastfeedingLaw.com.

Objective 1: Identify a legal problem that may be entwined in a medical problem
Objective 2: Avoid triggering and inappropriate language and behavior when with a women in the legal system
Objective 3: Give clients resources and references for dealing with legal problems

Abstract:

Breastfeeding women find themselves in need of assistance in a wide variety of legal contexts. This session reviews the options available to lactating women in custody disputes, as criminal defendants, as witnesses, when called for jury duty, and as immigration detainees.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 61 mins
Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Bridging the Gaps to Provide a Continuum of Care
USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE

Christy Jo has over 25 years of teaching experience. She is passionate about teaching in ways that simplify learning. She has been awarded the United States Presidential Volunteer Award for her community service, the Phyllis Klaus Founder's Award for her contribution to the Mother/Baby bond and the Above and Beyond Award for innovative projects that exemplify the mission of Public Health. She has also been named Lactation Educator Faculty of the Year from Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals Association and earned their Visionary Award in 2015. Christy Jo is the author of Mommy Feeds Baby and co-author of Making Milk. She created the Grow Our Own Lactation Consultant/IBCLC Prep Course which has been used to train hundreds of students to become Lactation Consultants. She currently resides in California with her husband and three children. She continues to serve her community as a birth doula, Private Practice IBCLC, Health Educator for Public Health, and faculty for the CAPPA CLE© and Childbirth Educator Programs.

Objective 1: Identify at least 3 perinatal professionals that should collaborate to support clients
Objective 2: Name two organizations that offer peer support
Objective 3: Identify specifically where one falls on the Continuum of Care

USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Abstract:

Promoting collaborations among caregivers and healthcare providers to ensure consistent and continual breastfeeding support.
This talk uses humor and scenarios to point out the necessity that those entrusted with a family’s care be professional, inclusive and open in order to provide the best support possible.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 62 mins
Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA
Mindful Breastfeeding: How Lactation Professionals Can Support Calm and Connection
USA Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA

Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Registered Lactation Consultant. She is the owner of Sound Beginnings, which provides in-home consultations and education on lactation, babywearing, and more. Her background as a birth and postpartum doula, and childbirth, newborn, and parenting educator, inform her compassionate and evidence-based support of new families in the greater Seattle area. Joy holds a Master of Arts in Cultural Studies, graduate certificate in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, and two Bachelors degrees from the University of Washington. She serves as adjunct faculty at the Simkin Center for Allied Birth Vocations at Bastyr University where she created the Breastfeeding for Doulas course. Joy is passionate about her family, social justice, and continuing education.

Objective 1: Explain the ways in which mindfulness practices can be supportive of the mental, emotional, and physiologic state of breastfeeding parents
Objective 2: Describe, in general terms, how mindfulness can benefit postpartum parents, their babies, and breastfeeding
Objective 3: Share at least three (3) strategies to increase mindfulness during breastfeeding

USA Joy MacTavish, IBCLC, RLC, MA
Abstract:

The age-old practice of mindfulness meditation has increased in popularity across the globe over the past four decades and gained traction within the psychological and medical fields. Mindfulness centers on non-judgmental awareness of one’s bodily sensations, thoughts, and emotions in the present moment. It has been scientifically shown to reduce stress, chronic pain, medical and psychological symptoms, and enhance immune function. Mindfulness practices often focus on psychobiological processes, which makes them well suited as in intervention during the perinatal period, and even more specifically breastfeeding. This presentation outlines the ways in which mindfulness can positively impact lactation, during its normal course and especially when there are challenges. As lactation professionals who clinically and holistically support clients, it is beneficial to be able to share mindfulness strategies that can serve as a bridge between the mental, emotional, and physiological realms. Through a greater understanding of the practical aspects of mindfulness, gentle interventions can be incorporated into each feeding session. By supporting calm and connection within the parent and between the parent and infant, the experience of breastfeeding can be enhanced.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 73 mins
Lifting up the Lactation Profession
Abstract:

During a time when lactation professionals are facing unprecedented negativity on top of the usual challenges, it’s easy to get drawn into the conflict or to start wondering if what we do makes a difference. How do we lift one another up to maintain a positive focus on using our knowledge and skills to guide families who are feeling scared and confused? How do we set aside our biases to make sure we’re listening to all sides? How do we connect and collaborate with other professions to expand the network of support for new families? This panel discussion focuses on answering those questions and providing steps that can be taken to promote collaboration both within the field of lactation and with other members of the health care team to improve breastfeeding knowledge translation and mobilization. This is your chance to hear from Dr. Amy Brown, Christy Jo Hendricks and Joy MacTavish as they share their thoughts on this hot topic during our panel discussion titled “Lifting up the Lactation Profession”.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 71 mins

Kiddada Green is the founding executive director of Black Mothers’ Breastfeeding Association, co-­‐creator of Black Breastfeeding Week, founding member of the National Association of Professional and Peer Lactation Supporters of Color, lead consultant for the First Food Friendly Community Initiative, and an esteemed member of the inaugural class of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Community Leadership Network Fellowship Program. She is committed to supporting families, and training maternal child health professionals on culturally appropriate breastfeeding support. As an expert in community-­‐centered approaches, she put forth recommendations for The U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding, has been featured in Ebony Magazine, and is a program reviewer for the American Public Health Association. She is a published writer for Breastfeeding Medicine and an avid learner. Kiddada holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Michigan State University and a Master’s Degree in the Art of Teaching from Oakland University.

Objective 1: Define "community breastfeeding"
Objective 2: Describe "active community outreach and support"
Objective 3: Illustrate ways to support, protect and promote breastfeeding within the community

Abstract:

This presentation provides clear and concise methods for maternal-­‐child-­‐health professionals and home visiting programs to become active supporters of breastfeeding families. The information shared is both for the novice and the experienced. Learn ways to build partnerships, improve advocacy and set organizational policies that are supportive of increased breastfeeding rates.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 30 mins
Lactation helpline in Indonesia: is it needed?

I am a wife and mother of two breastfed children. I was a general practitioner and am currently more focused on helping mothers to breastfeed. I work at Puri Cinere Hospital and Kemang Medical Care Women and Children as a lactation counselor. I currently on leave due to accompany my husband school in United State for his PhD programs. Since 2009, I've been helping mothers who have difficulties breastfeeding. It is a delight when we meet during tough times, then met again once their breastfed child are big and smart, and most importantly successfully breastfed. My desire is to help mothers to breastfed wherever I live in this world.

Objective 1: Describe Indonesian culture and it relation to doctor-patient communication
Objective 2: Discuss the lactation clinic services and helpline services which has been established in Puri Cinere Hospital, Depok, West Java, Indonesia
Objective 3: Describe problems which could be managed via helpline

Abstract:

Good doctor–patient communication is essential for positive health care outcomes. Ideal doctor–patient communication generally is reflected in a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. Helpline services is breaking the ice, and is considered a new option modality for patients in Indonesia. The ease in contacting medical professionals through phone and text messages seems more comfortable, personal and inexpensive.
Breastfeeding support via a helpline helps mother to feel reassured, confident and more determined to continue breastfeeding, and in majority of occasions resolves their particular concerns.
Lactation Clinic in Puri Cinere Hospital, Depok, West Java, Indonesia was established in August 2011 and operated a helpline since the beginning of its establishment. Helpline service is open 24 hours daily, through phone, text messages, whatsapp, or blackberry messenger directly to doctors who are also breastfeeding counselors. There are six doctors who take turns every month to receive calls and reply to messages. Helpline numbers are distributed to patients during post natal rounds or at patients doctors appointments in lactation clinic.
A longitudinal study conducted in March to December 2014 shows 202 helpline cases in 9 months. There were 29 cases (14%) questioning EBM handling, 24 cases (12%) asking about complementary feeding, 19 cases (9%) of infant stool, 19 cases (9%) medication and mother's milk, 15 cases (7%) frenotomy after care and other various problems. 63% cases were successful managed via helpline, and 37% cases were referred to the Lactation Clinic to get further help.
There were many cases resolved through helpline calls and messages. High success rate of helpline management shows that helpline program is effective to help mothers and resolved their particular concerns; especially in Indonesia.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 31 mins
Heidi Lam, B.So.Sci, IBCLC
Breastfeeding in Hong Kong and traditional Chinese wisdom on confinement practices
HK Heidi Lam, B.So.Sci, IBCLC

Heidi Lam is a private practice IBCLC and La Leche League Leader in Hong Kong. She tandem nurse her two daughters and have more then 8 years of breastfeeding experience. She was accredited as La Leche League Leader in 2009. In 2010, to she was awarded the Trudi Szallasi Memorial Scholarship from Health-e-learning.com to complete a one year course on lactation medicine. In 2011, she was qualified as International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. Her job focus mainly on home visits to clients and running breastfeeding classes. Heidi is also active in promoting breastfeeding and was often interviewed by parenting magazines and other media in Hong Kong. Heidi was a Hong Kong delegate to spoke at the Susuibu.com International Lactation Conference 2010 in Malaysia. She also speaks regularly at local breastfeeding support groups.

Objective 1: Describe breastfeeding in Hong Kong
Objective 2: Describe what are the major breastfeeding challenges
Objective 3: Describe Chinese wisdom of confinement practices

HK Heidi Lam, B.So.Sci, IBCLC
Abstract:

Breastfeeding rates upon discharge is rising in Hong Kong over the past 20 years. Breastfeeding has become more of a topic than ever before. However, it is still very common to have early introduction of formula and exclusive breastfeeding rate is still low. Most private hospitals do not allow 24 hours room in. Many mothers need to go back to work when the baby is only six weeks old. In Hong Kong, it is very common to practice a confinement period after birth. This traditional Chinese wisdom has many benefits for the mothers and babies. Mothers of other cultures can also make use of some of the practices to benefit themselves.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 31 mins
Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery
Rusty pipe syndrome: a case report from Poland
Poland Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery

Anna has been working as a midwife since 2009. From the very beginning of her studies she has been fascinated with breastfeeding. During her studies for her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Midwifery, her main area of interest was promotion and support for breastfeeding among women. Anna's interest in breastfeeding turned into a passion that led her to pursue the Polish Certification of Lactation Consultant and she is working toward certification as an IBCLC. She opened a private practice and a support group for local women in Krakow (cracko). Anna’s Interest and passion for lactation and breastfeeding have deepened during her current PhD studies. She is a PhD candidate in 2018 at University Medical College and is the coordinator of the Krakow Human Milk Bank.
Her scientific area of expertise: change in milk composition (macronutrients), human microbiota during pregnancy, lactation as well as tandem breastfeeding. Her research is carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Perinatology. Anna is the author of many lectures and workshops for students of midwifery and medicine in area of breastfeeding, lactation and the variation of composition of human milk. Since 2016 she has been popularizing the science of human lactation in Poland and she is always finding new ways to promote and support breastfeeding women. In her spare time she practices meditation, yin yoga and is learning how to dance rock and roll.

Objective 1: Describe Rusty Pipe Syndrome
Objective 2: List how to recognize the syndrome
Objective 3: Discuss how to support breastfeeding women with Rusty Pipe Syndrome

Poland Anna Kotlinska, PhD Candidate, Masters of Midwifery
Abstract:

Bloody nipple discharge is an unusual experience during lactation for both the mother and her attending physicians. Painless bleeding from the breasts in the early post-partum period can be a physiological condition called a rusty pipe syndrome. This report describes the case of bilateral bloody nipple discharge that started after caesarean section and subsequently ceased within a few days.
Natural breastfeeding is the best way of nourishing newborns and infants. The process of breast milk production starts as early as between weeks 16 and 22 of pregnancy and colostrum can appear from the nipple in the following weeks. Milk containing blood can be a cause of concern for the mother and her physician. The reasons can be various; however not all of them would be caused by bleeding from the glandular tissue.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 43 mins
Tamara Drenttel Brand, MA, MPH, IBCLC
Contextualizing Breastfeeding in Lebanon
Ireland Tamara Drenttel Brand, MA, MPH, IBCLC

Tamara Drenttel Brand, IBCLC, holds an MA in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Arizona and a Master’s in Public Health (MPH) from the American University of Beirut. An American by birth, but an expat in practice – she has spent 10 years in the Middle East, where she worked as a public health practitioner, maternal and child health consultant and an IBCLC. She has had the privilege of working with breastfeeding dyads from all over the world in both in private practice and as a La Leche League Leader. In 2011, she founded and still actively facilitates “Mama 2 Mama Beirut Breastfeeding Support,” the largest breastfeeding peer support network in the Middle East. Tamara enjoys creating DIY breastfeeding ‘hacks’ and free/low-cost lactation resources, which she details on Galactablog.com – a lactation site she founded “for lactation specialists and those aspiring to be.”
In her spare time, she is a furniture artist, avid upcycler and is becoming a specialist in rare, orphan diseases in a picturesque seaside village in Ireland, where she recently moved with her husband, 7 year- old son and rescued Arabian Mau.


Objective 1: List at least 2 prevalent cultural misconceptions about breastfeeding in Lebanon
Objective 2: Identify at least 2 determinants contributing to low breastfeeding rates in Lebanon
Objective 3: Describe at least 2 impacts of mother to mother support on breastfeeding in Lebanon

Ireland Tamara Drenttel Brand, MA, MPH, IBCLC
Abstract:

In Lebanon, nearly all mothers attempt to initiate breastfeeding. Despite high initiation rates, only 40% of mothers exclusively breastfed through the first month and nationally, a mere 2.4% continued to exclusively breastfeed between 4 and 5 months. Early weaning is a pressing public health concern as infant and under-5 morbidity rates are high. Environmental issues like water quality and sanitation can be problematic when supplemental formula or contaminated water is used. This presentation examines the breastfeeding trends in Lebanon and explores the complex and often overlapping historical, social, cultural, economic and policy determinants behind early weaning. Next, this presentation analyzes newly emerging factors such as the power of social media, collaboration of lactation specialists and the rise of influential mother support networks. The presentation will conclude by highlighting the growing breastfeeding support infrastructure in Lebanon, for the most part, facilitated by breastfeeding mothers themselves.

View Full Presentation Information

Accreditation

CERPs - Continuing Education Recognition Points
GOLD Conferences has been designated as a Long Term Provider of CERPs by the IBLCE--Approval #CLT114-07
25.5. CERPs (23.5 L-CERPs/2 E-CERPs)



If you have already participated in this program, you are not eligible to receive additional credits for viewing it again. Please sent us an email to team@goldlearning.com if you have any questions.

Additional Details

Viewing Time: 8 Weeks

Tags / Categories

Breastfeeding and Lactation

How much time do I have to view the presentations?

  • The viewing time will be specified for each product. When you purchase multiple items in your cart, the viewing time becomes CUMULATIVE. Ex. Lecture 1= 2 weeks and Lecture Pack 2 = 4 Weeks, you will have a total of 6 weeks viewing time for ALL the presentations made in that purchase.
  • Time for viewing the talks begins once you purchase the product. For Live Webinars & Symposiums, the viewing period begins from when the live event takes place. Presentations can be accessed 24/7 and can be viewed as many times as you like during the viewing period.

What are bundled lectures?

  • Presentations may be available individually or via a bundled package. Bundled lectures are a set of lectures that have been put together based on a specific category or topic. Some lectures will be available in both individual and lecture form, whereas others will be available only via a bundled lecture pack.

Will there be Handouts?

  • YES! Each lecture comes with a PDF handout provided by the Speaker.

Some lectures include a Q&A, what does that mean?

  • During our online conferences, presentations that occur live are also followed by a short 15 minute Question & Answer Session. The Speaker addresses questions that were posted by Delegates during the presentation. We include the recording of these Q&A Sessions as a bonus for you.

How can I receive a Certificate?

  • Once you are done viewing the lecture or the lectures within a bundle, submit your attendance record in order to be able to download your certificate.
Start Learning Today!

Professionals that selected this package also viewed

Page   1 of 0