GOLD Learning Speakers

United Kingdom

Dr. Amy Brown, PhD

  • Speaker Type: GOLD Lactation 2017, GOLD Alumni 2018
  • Country: United Kingdom
Biography:

Dr Amy Brown is an Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. Her research explores psychological, cultural and societal barriers to breastfeeding, with an emphasis on understanding how we can better support women to breastfeed and subsequently raise breastfeeding rates. Her primary focus is how we can shift our perception of breastfeeding as an individual mothering issue, to a wider public health problem, with consideration how we can make societal changes to protect and encourage breastfeeding. Dr Brown has published over 50 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year and has recently published her first book ‘Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies’. She is a regular Huffington Post blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Breastfeeding as a Public Health Issue: Do we Have the Right Approach?
The majority of women should be able to breastfeed, but elements of their experience are ultimately stopping them from doing so. Breastfeeding works best when done responsively but many psychological, social and cultural factors work directly or more subtly against responsive feeding, meaning that many mothers experience difficulties with breastfeeding which can lead to premature weaning. These factors can include separation of mother and baby, a lack of understanding of breast milk production, public attitudes and wider pressures of motherhood to name a few. If we want to support mothers to breastfeed we must understand and target these wider factors to create a supportive breastfeeding environment. It is important however that our approaches to breastfeeding promotion and education are perceived positively by mothers in order for them to be effective. In this presentation I’ll be addressing the common barriers to breastfeeding and their impact, along with new research that looks at how mothers perceive common breastfeeding education messaging and what this research tells us about how we can change our approach to ensure our messages have the intended impact.
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Breastfeeding trauma: how can we recognise and support mothers who wanted to breastfeed but were unable to meet their goals?
It is recognised that women can experience feelings of guilt, unhappiness and anger when they cannot meet their breastfeeding goals. Breastfeeding difficulties leading to early cessation are a risk factor for postnatal depression. However research has not previoulsy examined these feelings of loss and distress in relation to clinical models of trauma. From a research study exploring the experiences of over 3000 women who stopped breastfeeding before they were ready and held negative emotions around this decision, I argue that a subset of these women are displaying symptoms of clinical trauma in relation to their experience. The trauma stems from physical experiences of a difficult breastfeeding experience, but also the loss of a much desired breastfeeding relationship. The combinaton of these events leave the individual traumatised and understandably reactive to the topic of breastfeeding. Trauma models identify numerous emotions and behaviours that individuals typically display when they have been traumatised by an event. These include recurrent distressing recollections of the events, intense psychological distress at exposure toreminders of the event and efforts to avoind thoughts, feelings or activities that remind one of the event. This talk will identify how these symptoms are present in the experience of some women who have been unable to breastfeed and draw on suggestions from women as to how we may move forward from this, in order to both promote breastfeeding and support those who are unable to do so.
Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation