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Trauma & Breastfeeding Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Trauma & Breastfeeding for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Trauma & Breastfeeding online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Trauma & Breastfeeding education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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An advocate for women, Jodi Hall has dedicated herself to understanding the impact of traumatic events on the childbearing years, and toward creating solutions designed to change lives. Jodi shares her knowledge on topics related to trauma in the lives of mothers through workshops and training sessions for healthcare professionals, counsellors and social service workers throughout the world.
Jodi has worked as a doula since 1995, and a woman’s abuse counsellor where Jodi gained experience working directly with women experiencing abuse.  It is through years of sharing spaces with women experiencing abuse, that Jodi’s much sought after way of ‘being with’ women was nurtured.

Jodi Hall holds a PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences from the University of Western Ontario.  Jodi has been instrumental in various research studies on marginalized women’s access to services that promote health. She resides with her family in London, Ontario, where she co-runs a private counseling practice with Amanda Saunders, MSW, RSW and Holly Gibson, MSW, RSW, who are also skilled birth workers, called Sharing Spaces.

Abstract:

Health care professionals supporting women during the transition to mothering play an essential role in creating safer spaces to inquire about potential abuse. However, many health professionals are reluctant to routinely and universally inquire about abuse in pregnancy and the postpartum period, even though there is widespread recognition that abuse has devastating physical and emotional effects on the lives of women and their children with particular vulnerabilities during the transition to mothering. Research and experiential evidence suggests that pregnant women with histories of abuse want caregivers who are sensitive and responsive to their needs, know how to respond to disclosures of abuse, and are knowledgeable about services that could offer support. This workshop will provide a starting place to explore the nuances of creating safer spaces for women survivors of abuse, and some strategies to respond to disclosures.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Psychological Trauma and was Founding Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, a position she held for 11 years. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of APA’s Publications and Communications Board.

Abstract:

Can events from childhood influence a woman’s current mothering experience and her health and well-being? Yes, they can, but they don’t have to be the blueprint for the rest of her life. This session provides an overview of the latest research on the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences; their impact on breastfeeding; how they can affect a woman’s body, mind and spirit; and what she can do to cope.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. With a background in psychology, she has spent the last thirteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal influences upon infant feeding decisions in the first year. Her research seeks to understand how we can shift our perception of how babies are fed away from an individual mothering issue to a wider public health problem – with societal level solutions. Dr Brown has published over 60 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is a mother to three human children and three book babies: Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies, Why starting solids matters, and The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence. She is a regular blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Abstract:

It is recognised that women can experience feelings of guilt, unhappiness and anger when they cannot meet their breastfeeding goals. Breastfeeding difficulties leading to early cessation are a risk factor for postnatal depression. However research has not previoulsy examined these feelings of loss and distress in relation to clinical models of trauma.

From a research study exploring the experiences of over 3000 women who stopped breastfeeding before they were ready and held negative emotions around this decision, I argue that a subset of these women are displaying symptoms of clinical trauma in relation to their experience. The trauma stems from physical experiences of a difficult breastfeeding experience, but also the loss of a much desired breastfeeding relationship. The combinaton of these events leave the individual traumatised and understandably reactive to the topic of breastfeeding.

Trauma models identify numerous emotions and behaviours that individuals typically display when they have been traumatised by an event. These include recurrent distressing recollections of the events, intense psychological distress at exposure toreminders of the event and efforts to avoind thoughts, feelings or activities that remind one of the event. This talk will identify how these symptoms are present in the experience of some women who have been unable to breastfeed and draw on suggestions from women as to how we may move forward from this, in order to both promote breastfeeding and support those who are unable to do so.


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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Hawes provides clinical services in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and at the Perinatal and Postpartum Clinic at the Center for Children and Families at Women & Infants Hospital, where she treats women and their partners experiencing perinatal mood and anxiety issues. Treatment includes individual and family psychotherapy. She is an assistant professor (adjunct) in the Department of Pediatrics at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She trained in adult psychiatry and mental health at the University of Rhode Island and is board certified in adult psychiatric-mental health advanced practice nursing. Her research, clinical work, and lectures focus on stress and trauma related to the premature birth experience. In addition she studies the relationship between nursing practice and parent and infant outcomes; nurse-patient interaction; the healthcare work environment and provider and patient outcomes; and the epigenetics of stress. (https://vivo.brown.edu/display/khawes).

Abstract:

Classic animal studies have shown that maternal care of rat mothers e.g. licking and grooming and arched back nursing, impacts offspring outcomes such as behavior, development, and stress regulation. These outcomes persist over subsequent generations. Epigenetics, the study of how environmental influences affect gene expression, mediates these effects. In this session we will discuss and explore how similar epigenetic mechanisms in humans possibly relate to the protective effects of breastfeeding and maternal tactile stimulation on infant stress reactivity.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 2  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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United Kingdom Prof. Amy Brown, PhD; MSc; BSc

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK where she directs the new research centre ‘LIFT’ : Lactation, Infant Feeding and Translation. With a background in psychology, she first became interested in the increasingly global issue of low breastfeeding rates when breastfeeding her first baby. Three babies and a PhD later she has spent the last fifteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal barriers to breastfeeding, with an emphasis on understanding how we can shift our perception of breastfeeding from an individual mothering issue, to a wider public health problem. Professor Brown has published over 100 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is author of ‘Breastfeeding Uncovered’, ‘Why starting solids matters’, ‘The positive breastfeeding book’, ‘Informed is best’, ‘Why breastfeeding grief and trauma matter’, ‘A guide to support breastfeeding for the medical profession’ and the soon to be published ‘Let’s talk about the first year of parenting’.

United Kingdom Prof. Amy Brown, PhD; MSc; BSc
Abstract:

Promoting breastfeeding as protective of both maternal and infant health is a central role or governments, health professionals and breastfeeding advocates. Talking about breastfeeding difficulties and why ingrained barriers must be tackled is essential to ensuring the situation changes for future mothers. However, sometimes it feels as if we are caught in a vicious circle; we must talk about breastfeeding as our rates are low and many women wish they had breastfed for longer, yet discussing these issues is often criticized as causing pain. This talk will present findings from a large research study which explored the experiences of over 2000 women who could not breastfeed for as long as they wanted, presenting their lasting emotions from their experience alongside their ideas for how we could promote breastfeeding in ways that cause them the least pain. The concept of negative breastfeeding emotions displaying as psychological grief or trauma for a subgroup of women will be discussed, alongside the factors that they felt made their experience or feelings worse.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Alison K. Hazelbaker, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA, CST, RCST, PPNE
Dr. Hazelbaker has been a therapist in private practice for over 30 years. She specializes in cross-disciplinary treatment and to that end has taken training in several modalities to best assist her clients. She is a certified Craniosacral Therapist, a Lymph Drainage Therapy practitioner, a Tummy Time™ Trainer, a Haller Method practitioner, A Pre and Perinatal Psychology Educator, a Lactation Therapist Diplomate, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and a fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association.

She earned her Master’s Degree from Pacific Oaks College (Human Development specializing in Human Lactation) and her doctorate from The Union Institute and University (Psychology, specializing in Energetic and Transformational healing.)

People recognize her as an expert on infant sucking issues caused by various structural problems like torticollis, plagiocephaly, brachycephaly and tissue shock-trauma. She invented the Hazelbaker™ FingerFeeder and the Infant Breastfeeding CranioSacral Protocol™ to assist in the resolution of this type of infant sucking dysfunction.
USA Alison K. Hazelbaker, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA, CST, RCST, PPNE
Abstract:

This presentation examines infant trauma and its adverse impact on breastfeeding. Dr. Hazelbaker begins by defining trauma then cites the various intrauterine, intrapartum and postpartum causes of trauma. She suggests prevention strategies and outlines ways to prevent and mitigate trauma including simple methods for resolving trauma easily employed by lactation consultants.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.75 (details)
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U.S.A. Cynthia Good, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, CATSM

Cynthia Good, MS Clinical Psychology, is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Clinical Counselor, author, consultant, and internationally recognized speaker. She is the Director of LifeCircle Consulting, LLC and is Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. She is based in the Seattle, Washington, USA area, where she formerly served as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Midwifery at Bastyr University where she taught counseling skills and is a therapist at Sandbox Therapy Group where she works with children, adults, and families. Cynthia has a strong interest in the emerging field of lactational psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations, providing information and teaching skills that are essential to understanding and effectively responding to the complex psychosocial realities of families living in diverse contexts. The focus of her presentations includes communication skills and counseling techniques for perinatal care providers; equity, diversity, and inclusion; infant feeding rhetoric; perinatal mental health; perinatal loss, grief, and trauma; ethics; serving as an expert witness in lactation-related court cases; cultural competence and humility; vitamin D; and more.

U.S.A. Cynthia Good, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, CATSM
Abstract:

Up to one third of mothers report experiencing birth trauma and postpartum symptoms of traumatic stress. Birth is traumatic when mothers experience or perceive a threat to life, serious injury, or threat to physical integrity (for themselves or their baby) or experience the death of their baby. Pre-existing risk factors and birth-related risk factors for traumatic birth are staggeringly common. Childbirth trauma and postpartum traumatic stress negatively impacts mothers and their babies, and can result in the undermining of breastfeeding, additional grief over the loss of breastfeeding, and increased health risks for mother and baby. This session offers a sensitive discussion of how traumatic birth experiences affect maternal mental health, mothering, breastfeeding, and lactation consulting. It includes the importance of recognizing the difference between postpartum depression and postpartum stress disorders in new mothers, screening mothers for traumatic stress, and referring potentially traumatized mothers for diagnosis and possible treatment.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 23.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Briana Tillman, IBCLC, M. Ed, OMS-III

Briana Tillman received her undergraduate degree in International Relations from the United States Military Academy at West Point. She has been a La Leche League Leader for 9 years and is a board certified lactation consultant. After spending 10 years as a stay-at-home mom, she is currently in her third year of medical school at Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colorado. She loves spending time with her husband and three kids—as a family they like to travel, go camping, and play string instruments in “family ensemble.”

Nick is a 3rd year medical student at Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He has a background in mechanical and systems engineering but found his calling in medicine after volunteering for Health4Haiti in 2011. He lives in Colorado with his wife and they enjoy hiking, camping and fishing in the great outdoors.

USA Briana Tillman, IBCLC, M. Ed, OMS-III
Abstract:

Due to the global shortage of mental health professionals, many primary care providers have become the first-line responders to a wide variety of psychiatric concerns. While lactation consultants and breastfeeding support counselors are not called upon to diagnose and treat mental health disorders, they nonetheless often become enmeshed in the topic due to the holistic nature of breastfeeding management. An understanding of the major psychiatric topics that can arise during lactation consultation is therefore a valuable asset.

In this presentation, we will describe mental health benefits and drawbacks of breastfeeding, and explore the controversy surrounding the “breast is best” campaign as it regards maternal mental health. We will also briefly explore the pharmacological and non-pharmacological options in treatment of major psychiatric disorders (e.g. generalized anxiety, major depressive disorder, bipolar mood disorder, schizophrenia) as they relate to lactation. Finally, we will review the scientific literature related to potential long-term mental health effects of breastfeeding on babies.


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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.