GOLD Learning Speakers

U.S.A.

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA

  • Speaker Type: Infant Sleep (Research & Practice) Lecture Pack 2015, GOLD Lactation 2015, Mental Health Lecture Pack 2016, Trauma Informed Care Lecture Pack 2018
  • Country: U.S.A.
Biography:

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of two peer-reviewed Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women's-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology. Her research interests include the psychoneuroimmunology of maternal depression and the lifetime health effects of trauma. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 370 articles or chapters and is the author or editor of 24 books on maternal depression, family violence, and breastfeeding. Her most recent books include: Psychology of Trauma 101 (2015) and The Science of Mother-Infant Sleep (2014). Her websites are UppityScienceChick.com, BreastfeedingMadeSimple.com, KathleenKendall-Tackett.com, and PraeclarusPress.com. Google Scholar link: http://bit.ly/1nSwWIW

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Mother-Infant Sleep Location: It’s Not as Simple as it Seems
Policy makers often describe mother-infant sleep in fairly black-and-white terms, and try to condense their message into a single declarative statement: don’t sleep with your baby. Recent research, however, shows that mother-infant sleep is considerably more complex than it is usually portrayed. This presentation discusses new findings from the U.S. sample of the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue (n=4789). These findings describe the groups most likely to bedshare including differences by ethnic-group, income, employment status, partner status, maternal age, income, and education. There are substantial ethnic-group differences on the percentage of mothers who feed in chairs and recliners (e.g., African American mothers have very low rates of these dangerous behaviors). There are also large ethnic-group differences in where mothers and their partners think babies should sleep, and this will govern behavior. Using the full sample of the Survey (N=6410), this presentation also examines sleep location by feeding status. Breastfeeding/bedsharing mothers do the best of all groups on measures of sleep, depression, and anxiety. In contrast, formula-feeding/bedsharing mothers do worse on every measure, suggesting that bedsharing while breastfeeding is a very different physiological condition to bedsharing while formula-feeding. In summary, the findings of both analyses suggest that a single message for all groups will not be effective. It is important to take into account the many different ways that mothers and babies sleep in order to promote safe mother-infant sleep.
Accreditation, Main Category, Product Type
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Infant Sleep
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Breastfeeding Helps Mothers Overcome the Legacy of Abuse and Adversity: It Makes All the Difference
We do not live in a perfect world. Many new mothers have experienced abuse and adversity as children. They often wonder whether they will perpetuate the cycle of violence that they have experienced. They may also have a history of depression and wonder whether this has harmed their children. Fortunately, we can offer new mothers hope. Recent studies have found that breastfeeding helps mothers mother—even when there is a history of abuse. It not about the milk; it’s the physical act of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding improves maternal sleep, lowers the risk of depression, lessens anger and irritability, and even attenuates the negative effects of past sexual assault. Breastfeeding offers mothers a chance to do things differently—to be a different kind of parent. When it comes to overcoming adversity, breastfeeding makes all the difference.
Accreditation, Main Category, Product Type
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
What’s New in Postpartum Depression? A Summary of Current Findings
A number of recent studies have raised questions about the way we understand depression in new mothers. For example, what is the role of depression in breastfeeding cessation and does mothers’ prenatal intention to breastfeed make a difference? Researchers have also found that epidurals lower the risk of depression, but the sample sizes are often small. Finally, a concerning trend has emerged regarding the link between depression, PTSD, and preterm birth. Women with depression or PTSD are at increased risk for preterm birth. The World Health Organization has recently identified preterm birth as the single greatest cause of infant mortality worldwide. These findings also have important implications for racial/ethnic disparities in both preterm birth and infant mortality. This presentation will summarize and synthesize these recent studies and present new findings from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue that address the link between birth interventions and depression in mothers.
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Compassion Strategies
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Breastfeeding and Survivors of Adverse Childhood Events
Can events from childhood influence a woman’s current mothering experience and her health and well-being? Yes, they can, but they don’t have to be the blueprint for the rest of her life. This session provides an overview of the latest research on the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences; their impact on breastfeeding; how they can affect a woman’s body, mind and spirit; and what she can do to cope.
Accreditation, Main Category, Product Type
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Midwifery