Breastfeeding Trauma: How Can We Recognise and Support Mothers Who Wanted to Breastfeed but Were Unable to Meet Their Goals?

It is recognised that women can experience feelings of guilt, unhappiness and anger when they cannot meet their breastfeeding goals. Breastfeeding difficulties leading to early cessation are a risk factor for postnatal depression. However research has not previoulsy examined these feelings of loss and distress in relation to clinical models of trauma.

From a research study exploring the experiences of over 3000 women who stopped breastfeeding before they were ready and held negative emotions around this decision, I argue that a subset of these women are displaying symptoms of clinical trauma in relation to their experience. The trauma stems from physical experiences of a difficult breastfeeding experience, but also the loss of a much desired breastfeeding relationship. The combinaton of these events leave the individual traumatised and understandably reactive to the topic of breastfeeding.

Trauma models identify numerous emotions and behaviours that individuals typically display when they have been traumatised by an event. These include recurrent distressing recollections of the events, intense psychological distress at exposure toreminders of the event and efforts to avoind thoughts, feelings or activities that remind one of the event. This talk will identify how these symptoms are present in the experience of some women who have been unable to breastfeed and draw on suggestions from women as to how we may move forward from this, in order to both promote breastfeeding and support those who are unable to do so.

This lecture was originally offered as part of the GOLD Lactation Alumni Presentations 2018 Package. This program has been approved for 1 CERP (1 L-CERP).

Free to GOLD Learning Delegates with Alumni Status - Do you have Alumni status? As a special thank you to our past participants that have attended 5 or more Conferences, you are invited to attend with a complimentary registration. Ad

$15.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 1.00   Access Time: 2 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (1):
Durations: 60 mins
Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Breastfeeding Trauma: How Can We Recognise and Support Mothers Who Wanted to Breastfeed but Were Unable to Meet Their Goals?
United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. With a background in psychology, she has spent the last thirteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal influences upon infant feeding decisions in the first year. Her research seeks to understand how we can shift our perception of how babies are fed away from an individual mothering issue to a wider public health problem – with societal level solutions. Dr Brown has published over 60 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is a mother to three human children and three book babies: Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies, Why starting solids matters, and The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence. She is a regular blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

Objective 1: To examine the wider psychological concept of trauma;

Objective 2: To understand how women feel when they want to breastfeed but cannot;

Objective 3: To consider how women's experiences of not being able to breastfeed fit trauma theory;

Objective 4: To explore how women experiencing breastfeeding trauma can best be supported.


United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Abstract:

It is recognised that women can experience feelings of guilt, unhappiness and anger when they cannot meet their breastfeeding goals. Breastfeeding difficulties leading to early cessation are a risk factor for postnatal depression. However research has not previoulsy examined these feelings of loss and distress in relation to clinical models of trauma.

From a research study exploring the experiences of over 3000 women who stopped breastfeeding before they were ready and held negative emotions around this decision, I argue that a subset of these women are displaying symptoms of clinical trauma in relation to their experience. The trauma stems from physical experiences of a difficult breastfeeding experience, but also the loss of a much desired breastfeeding relationship. The combinaton of these events leave the individual traumatised and understandably reactive to the topic of breastfeeding.

Trauma models identify numerous emotions and behaviours that individuals typically display when they have been traumatised by an event. These include recurrent distressing recollections of the events, intense psychological distress at exposure toreminders of the event and efforts to avoind thoughts, feelings or activities that remind one of the event. This talk will identify how these symptoms are present in the experience of some women who have been unable to breastfeed and draw on suggestions from women as to how we may move forward from this, in order to both promote breastfeeding and support those who are unable to do so.


View Full Presentation Information

Accreditation

CERPs - Continuing Education Recognition Points
GOLD Conferences has been designated as a Long Term Provider of CERPs by the IBLCE--Approval #CLT114-07
1CERP (1L CERP).

If you have already participated in this program, you are not eligible to receive additional credits for viewing it again. Please email us at team@goldlearning.com if you have any questions.

Tags / Categories

Breastfeeding and Lactation

How much time do I have to view the presentations?

  • The viewing time will be specified for each product. When you purchase multiple items in your cart, the viewing time becomes CUMULATIVE. Ex. Lecture 1= 2 weeks and Lecture Pack 2 = 4 Weeks, you will have a total of 6 weeks viewing time for ALL the presentations made in that purchase.
  • Time for viewing the talks begins once you purchase the product. For Live Webinars & Symposiums, the viewing period begins from when the live event takes place. Presentations can be accessed 24/7 and can be viewed as many times as you like during the viewing period.

What are bundled lectures?

  • Presentations may be available individually or via a bundled package. Bundled lectures are a set of lectures that have been put together based on a specific category or topic. Some lectures will be available in both individual and lecture form, whereas others will be available only via a bundled lecture pack.

Will there be Handouts?

  • YES! Each lecture comes with a PDF handout provided by the Speaker.

Some lectures include a Q&A, what does that mean?

  • During our online conferences, presentations that occur live are also followed by a short 15 minute Question & Answer Session. The Speaker addresses questions that were posted by Delegates during the presentation. We include the recording of these Q&A Sessions as a bonus for you.

How can I receive a Certificate?

  • If this presentation offers a certificate, once you are done viewing the lecture or the lectures within a bundle, submit your attendance record in order to be able to download your certificate. You'll be able to see which credits are offered for the lecture by hovering over the "Credits Available" link within the "Speakers & Topics" tab.
Start Learning Today!

Professionals that selected this package also viewed

Page   1 of 0