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Establishing Breastfeeding Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Establishing Breastfeeding for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Establishing Breastfeeding online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Establishing Breastfeeding education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

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Beyond Baby Friendly, Thinking Outside the Box

By Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jane Morton has had a long, fulfilling career as a general pediatrician, She has also had a long-standing interest in breastfeeding, from understanding its clinical benefits to practical solutions for mothers having difficulty in providing breastmilk to their infants.  Over the years, she has conducted research on human milk and breastfeeding and has designed and implemented systems and policies to help breastfeeding mothers.  She produced award winning videos on this topic, including “Breastfeeding: A Guide to Getting Started”, “A Preemie Needs His Mother: Breastfeeding a Premature Baby” and “Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding”.  These have been translated and widely used in thousands of hospitals to train both staff and new mothers. As an executive board member of both the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding, she enjoyed working to enlarge the footprint of breastfeeding, both nationally and internationally.

For a 5 year period, she joined the neonatology clinical faculty at Stanford to develop the Breastfeeding Medicine Program.  In that position, she had the opportunity to design a nationally recognized educational program, conduct and publish original research on milk production and composition in mothers of very low birth weight infants, and publish a study with the AAP on the efficacy of a breastfeeding curriculum for physician residents in training. She was an advisor to the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, and was a key author of the toolkit “Nutritional Support for the Very Low Birth Weight Infant”. She co-authored the book Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU.  She has published extensively and presented her original research and educational workshops internationally. She continues to teach at Stanford where she is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Emerita.

USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Abstract:

Complications of insufficient milk production and suboptimal intake account for delayed discharge, readmission, potentially serious medical complications and a sharp drop off in any breastfeeding before 1 month. Reframing lactation support based on prevention, accessibility and sustainability, we could logically reduce these complications, while increasing exclusive breastfeeding rates for both low and at-risk infants. Recent science supports the importance of beginning this support for all mothers in the first post delivery hour, to prevent what might be called, “the lost first hour syndrome”.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Suzanne Colson, PhD, MSc, Midwife, Nurse

Suzanne Colson, PhD, MSc, BA, is a midwife and a nurse. Her thesis introduced a new breastfeeding paradigm called Biological Nurturing and won the prestigious English Royal College of Nursing Inaugural Akinsanya Award for originality and scholarship in doctoral studies. Suzanne is an Akinsanya scholar 2007, and a Visiting Principal Research Fellow at Canterbury Christ Church University. She is an honorary member and a founding mother/leader of La Leche League France. She is also on the professional advisory board of La Leche League of Great Britain. She has more than 40 years clinical experience supporting breastfeeding mothers in both hospital and community settings. Suzanne is the author of numerous articles, research papers, a book, translated into 4 languages and three DVDs. Retired from active midwifery practice, she organizes 5-day biological nurturing certification workshops, remains available for clinical consultation, and lectures widely across the world.


United Kingdom Suzanne Colson, PhD, MSc, Midwife, Nurse
Abstract:

Biological nurturing (BN), a mother-led approach, promotes body contact even when the baby is asleep. BN theories link hormonal continuity from pregnancy to postpartum and reflex continuity from womb to world. During the last weeks of pregnancy, oxytocin levels rise, peaking immediately following birth. Early baby gazing and eye-to-eye contact help maintain this high oxytocin pulsatility associated with increased breastfeeding duration. Experts in Body-Mind Centering suggest that fetal reflexes radiate from the navel--- the core, thus preparing neonatal movement. Whilst suckling in BN positions, pressure radiates from navel to limbs triggering neonatal reflexes facilitating latch and sustaining milk transfer. During BN, mothers and babies are often lightly dressed challenging the current emphasis on skin-to-skin as the only early intervention aiding breastfeeding initiation. Importantly, BN research suggests that ventral pressure is the neonatal behavioral releaser for both interventions, not dress state. Attend this presentation to clarify continuity theory and discover some unexpected breastfeeding “myths”.


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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Carmela is a family medicine MD, bachelor´s degree in Public Health Education, and IBCLC since 2005. She is also a BFHI Evaluator and the co founder and past president of the Spanish Lactation Consultant Association (AECCLM). She works in a private Family Wellness Clinic, Raices, as person in charge of the lactation program, which includes two IBCLCs attending breastfeeding families and an extensive offer of breastfeeding training for health care professionals and breastfeeding peer counsellors. The team has trained over three thousand doctors, midwives and nurses from both the Spanish National Health Service and the private sector in Spain. She is a frequent lecturer at national conferences, and has also lectured internationally, both on-site and online. She is the author of several scientific papers on breast pain, mastitis and tongue tie. She is also the author of a breastfeeding/parenting book, “Amar con los Brazos Abiertos” (To Love with Open Arms). She is married to Carlos and they homeschool their four children.

Abstract:

The most frequent cause of weaning worldwide is mother´s feeling that she does not have enough milk or that her infant is hungry despite her efforts… and frequently this perception becomes a reality. What support systems and clinical strategies can we use to protect mother´s normal capacity for milk production?

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Robyn Schafer, CNM, MSN, RN, EdM, IBCLC

Robyn Schafer, CNM, MSN, RN, EdM, IBCLC, is a full-scope midwife in private practice in Rockland County, New York, where she cares for a diverse patient population. She also works as a lactation consultant at a federally qualified health center in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. As the lead author of “Physiologic breastfeeding: A contemporary approach to breastfeeding initiation,” Robyn was honored to receive the Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health’s award for Best Review Article in 2016. Her current research interests include appropriate and effective midwifery care for grandmultiparous women. Robyn is passionate about providing family-centered, compassionate, evidence-based care to women throughout their pregnancies and births, and supporting mothers and babies in the creation and continuation of positive breastfeeding relationships. When she’s not caring for women or welcoming babies into the world, she enjoys her time with her husband and their five wonderful children.

U.S.A. Robyn Schafer, CNM, MSN, RN, EdM, IBCLC
Abstract:

Midwives are making great strides in their efforts to renormalize and promote physiologic birth. As a key component of the fourth stage of birth and a critical moment in the formation of the mother-baby relationship, physiologic breastfeeding initiation should be considered a keystone of midwifery care. Despite the importance of early breastfeeding on maternal-child health and the vital role maternity care providers play in successful initiation, there is limited evidence regarding the effectiveness of various clinical approaches to supporting breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum. In this talk, Robyn Schafer, CNM, MSN, RN, EdM, IBCLC, reviews historical approaches to breastfeeding initiation and presents the available evidence on the efficacy of various methods. She also discusses contemporary philosophies and presents the model of physiologic breastfeeding initiation. In conclusion, she provides recommendations for clinical practice to support mothers and babies in this essential process.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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can Cindy Leclerc, RN IBCLC

Cindy Leclerc and Jana Stockham are Registered Nurses and IBCLCs with over 20 years experience helping families get started with breastfeeding. In addition to hands on care, Cindy and Jana use technology to support families through their website (cindyandjana.com), online prenatal breastfeeding classes (simplybreastfeeding.ca) and iPhone app, NuuNest. Cindy is a strong believer in mother-to-mother support, helping to facilitate breastfeeding and postpartum depression support groups. She is intrigued by all things online and actively uses social media to promote breastfeeding. Jana has been trained as a Baby Friendly assessor and helped to coordinate the first Baby Friendly designation in Saskatchewan. She has a passion to help families with new babies and facilitates a group for breastfeeding moms.

can Cindy Leclerc, RN IBCLC
Abstract:

The majority of women begin breastfeeding at birth. Within the first 6 weeks, however, breastfeeding rates fall dramatically. To help women hang in with breastfeeding beyond the first weeks, we must first understand why they struggle. Learn what the research is saying and what you can do in your practice to help women meet their breastfeeding goals. IBCLC’s who specialize in the early weeks of breastfeeding will share case examples based on over 20 years of working with breastfeeding families.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor

Professor Amy Brown is based in the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences at Swansea University in the UK. With a background in psychology, she has spent the last thirteen years exploring psychological, cultural and societal influences upon infant feeding decisions in the first year. Her research seeks to understand how we can shift our perception of how babies are fed away from an individual mothering issue to a wider public health problem – with societal level solutions. Dr Brown has published over 60 papers exploring the barriers women face in feeding their baby during the first year. She is a mother to three human children and three book babies: Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies, Why starting solids matters, and The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence. She is a regular blogger, aiming to change the way we think about breastfeeding, mothering and caring for our babies.

United Kingdom Amy Brown, PhD, Professor
Abstract:

We know that responsive feeding gets breastfeeding off to the best start. New parents are told that breastfed babies often feed 8 – 12 times a day, but in practice many new mothers will find themselves breastfeeding more frequently than this. Research exploring breastfeeding frequency is however conducted primarily with younger infants, focuses simply on breast versus bottle, or was funded by industry.

This presentation reports novel findings from a research study of 18,000+ mothers with a baby or child aged 0 – 5 years old. It examines how often babies feed during the day and night for each age range by milk feeding type, mode, and approach (e.g. schedule versus responsive) and how frequent day and night feedings remain the norm for breastfed babies into the preschool years. The data also explores differences in maternal perceptions of infant variations in hunger e.g. in response to growth spurts, variations over different days, and cluster feeding, highlighting how breastfeeding mothers describe a more varied pattern of infant feeding compared to those formula feeding.

Together the findings challenge notions that most babies breastfeed between 8 – 12 times per 24 hour and that irregular patterns or varied numbers of feeds are normal for breastfed infants. Although many breastfeeding practitioners will recognise this pattern, these findings will provide both an addition and challenge to the scarce existing research literature on infant feeding patterns.


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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.