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Discharging From NICU Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Discharging From NICU for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Discharging From NICU online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Discharging From NICU education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc
Abstract:

Survival in preterm infants has increased over the last few years, and this has been accompanied by an increasing focus on the importance of nutrition and the effects of preterm birth on later outcomes. Providing nutrition to sick preterm infants in the NICU is complex, and almost all preterm infants are discharged with growth outcomes (weight and length) considerably below their birth centiles. This is important because data show an association between poorer growth and nutritional status in the NICU, and worse longterm neurodevelopmental outcomes. Whilst greater efforts are required to improve nutritional status prior to discharge, the post-discharge setting represents a time period when brain growth is also rapid, and where the potential exists to improve outcome through nutritional interventions. However, the potential benefits of improved brain outcomes need to be considered alongside the possibility of metablic harm induced by excessively rapid growth which may increase risks of obesity and later chronic disease. This talk will consider the continued importance of breast milk after discharge, the potential role of fortifiers and supplements in meeting nutrient requirements, and issues around the timing of introduction of complementary foods.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)

Paulina Erices is a bilingual (Spanish) International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and a Maternal Child Health Specialist for Jefferson County Public Health in Colorado. She holds a BS in Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University and a MS in Organizational Leadership from the University of Denver. Paulina is the coordinator for Adelante, the Latino Network for Health and Education and participates in several workgroups focused on child and family health, including the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership, the NICU Consortium, and the Community Leaders in Health Equity. Her areas of current work include providing direct service to families with babies who have been in the NICU and/or have other medical conditions; promoting maternal and infant mental health along the continuum of care; building community capacity to navigate health and education systems as well as influence program development/delivery; and establishing community-based participatory lactation programs to meet the needs of diverse communities. Paulina 's goal is to elevate the voices and influence of community members to effectively improve systems of care.

United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)
Abstract:

Lactation consultants would benefit from expanding their understanding of the impact of the NICU stay on the family; moreover, they would benefit from identifying the essential role they could play in assisting families to accomplish a positive, healthy, and smooth transition home.
Despite continuing efforts to reduce prematurely worldwide, a significant number of infants are born too early or in a fragile medical condition. Many of these infants experience a lengthy stay at the NICU. Lactation support varies across facilities, but families, especially mothers, develop strong connections with their lactation consultant. As one of their most consistent providers in the NICU, the lactation consultant has the opportunity to recognize families’ need for continuing support after discharge and strategies to protect the breastfeeding relationship, attachment, and mental health in the long term.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Canada Karen Lasby, RN, MN, CNeoN(C)

Karen Lasby leads a specialized nursing team in post-discharge follow-up of extremely premature infants and their families, the only team of its kind in Canada. She has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on the topics of premature babies, oral feeding, and NICU-to-home transition. She has been the co-investigator in several research studies examining outcomes for very low birth weight infants and has published articles on maternal work in the NICU, neonatal transition, and gastroesophageal reflux. An educator for nearly thirty years, Karen has taught, written instructional material, and produced online neonatal nursing courses. Formerly the president of the Canadian Association of Neonatal Nurses, she served on this national board for twelve years, and on the board of the Council for International Neonatal Nurses for three years. Karen’s work has been recognized by the Canadian Institute of Child Health and College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta. Karen has also recently published a parent book, Preemie Care: A guide to navigate the first year with your premature baby.

Canada Karen Lasby, RN, MN, CNeoN(C)
Abstract:

Discharge teaching programs are typically established based on what we as health care providers think parents need to know. Reality sets in very quickly for families after taking home a premature newborn. Despite thorough discharge teaching and parent involvement in hospital, parents are surprised by the challenges they face post-discharge. Feeding, behavior, reflux, sleep, and parenting troubles top the list. Based on over twenty years’ experience working with premature infants and their families beyond discharge, the presenter will reveal common challenges encountered and discuss research-based and practical strategies for the NICU team to share with parents to smooth the transition home. A greater knowledge of post discharge sequelae and preventative strategies will aid the NICU team in optimizing the discharge process and ultimately improve outcomes for babies and parents.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.