GOLD Learning Speakers

UK

Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

  • Speaker Type: GOLD Perinatal 2015, GOLD Neonatal 2017
  • Country: UK
Biography:

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Milk and gut microbes: early feeding and outcomes in preterm and term neonates
There is increasing evidence that the pattern of gut microbes affects a range of health and disease outcomes for both term and preterm infants. At birth, the gastro-intestinal tract is largely sterile, but rapidly becomes colonized by organisms in the environment, contact with the mother and from breast milk. The numerous advantages of breast milk throughout the life-course may be due, in part, to the patterns of early gut bacteria, and the interactions between milk, microbes and the immune system. These interactions are likely to be pivotal to the development of infections and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, a serious inflammatory gut complication) in preterm infants. Data show that early colonisation in preterm infants on NICUs is profoundly abnormal. However, knowing how these patterns are affected by milk type, immuno-nutrients (such as lactoferrin), antibiotics and probiotics is important as it may allow the design of strategies to improve health outcomes.
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 20.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Milk and gut microbes: early feeding and outcomes in preterm and term neonates
There is increasing evidence that the pattern of gut microbes affects a range of health and disease outcomes for both term and preterm infants. At birth, the gastro-intestinal tract is largely sterile, but rapidly becomes colonized by organisms in the environment, contact with the mother and from breast milk. The numerous advantages of breast milk throughout the life-course may be due, in part, to the patterns of early gut bacteria, and the interactions between milk, microbes and the immune system. These interactions are likely to be pivotal to the development of infections and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, a serious inflammatory gut complication) in preterm infants. Data show that early colonisation in preterm infants on NICUs is profoundly abnormal. However, knowing how these patterns are affected by milk type, immuno-nutrients (such as lactoferrin), antibiotics and probiotics is important as it may allow the design of strategies to improve health outcomes.
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Feeding preterm babies after hospital discharge: breast-milk, fortifier, supplements and complementary foods
Survival in preterm infants has increased over the last few years, and this has been accompanied by an increasing focus on the importance of nutrition and the effects of preterm birth on later outcomes. Providing nutrition to sick preterm infants in the NICU is complex, and almost all preterm infants are discharged with growth outcomes (weight and length) considerably below their birth centiles. This is important because data show an association between poorer growth and nutritional status in the NICU, and worse longterm neurodevelopmental outcomes. Whilst greater efforts are required to improve nutritional status prior to discharge, the post-discharge setting represents a time period when brain growth is also rapid, and where the potential exists to improve outcome through nutritional interventions. However, the potential benefits of improved brain outcomes need to be considered alongside the possibility of metablic harm induced by excessively rapid growth which may increase risks of obesity and later chronic disease. This talk will consider the continued importance of breast milk after discharge, the potential role of fortifiers and supplements in meeting nutrient requirements, and issues around the timing of introduction of complementary foods.
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Neonates