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The Newborn Microbiome Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for The Newborn Microbiome for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These The Newborn Microbiome online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This The Newborn Microbiome education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Webinar

Breast Milk and the Microbiome

By Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student

Briana Tillman received her undergraduate degree in International Relations from the United States Military Academy at West Point. She has been a La Leche League Leader for 9 years and is a board certified lactation consultant. After spending 10 years as a stay-at-home mom, she is currently attending medical school at Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colorado. She loves spending time with her husband and three elementary-school-aged children—as a family they like to play board games, go camping, and play bluegrass and chamber music.

United States Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student
Abstract:

Recently, much scientific inquiry has turned to the new frontier of the “microbiome", the many microscopic beings living commensally or symbiotically in and upon the human body. Breast milk’s contribution to the development and sustenance of healthy gut bacteria is immense, in that it not only provides bacteria for the initial seeding, but also contains an ideal nutrient base designed to promote beneficial flora while simultaneously discouraging pathogens. This presentation will explore the relevant theories and understanding of these processes.
We will delve into the long-term health outcomes associated with the microbiome, including obesity, diabetes, brown-to-white fat ratio, gastrointestinal concerns, and allergies. This presentation will also explore the impact of breast milk storage and pasteurization techniques on its microbiologic activity. Additionally, we will look at other aspects of the microbiome as they relate to skin-to-skin contact, vaginal birth and breastfeeding.
Finally, we will describe bacterial roles in infant neurological development, allergies, digestion, immunity, and future obesity. Healthcare practitioners need to be aware of the benefits of microbial diversity in order to effectively counsel new parents, especially those with infants at risk for immunological or digestive concerns.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC

Melissa Cole is a board-certified lactation consultant, neonatal oral-motor assessment professional and clinical herbalist in private practice. Melissa is passionate about providing comprehensive, holistic lactation support and improving the level of clinical lactation skills for health professional. She enjoys researching and writing, especially on topics such tongue tie and botanical medicine.

Her bachelor’s degree is in maternal/child health and lactation and her master’s degree is in therapeutic herbalism. Before pursuing her current path, Melissa’s background was in education and cultural arts, which has served her well in her work as a lactation consultant and healthcare educator. She loves living, working and playing in the beautiful Pacific Northwest with her 3 children.

U.S.A. Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

This session will focus on common concerns regarding infant digestive health and useful support strategies that care providers can incorporate into their work with families. We will discuss what's normal and what's not in regard to stooling, spit up/reflux, colic/fussiness, food sensitivities, and more. Many parents are coping with babies that are uncomfortable and unhappy due to digestive health concerns. Dealing with a fussy, uncomfortable baby is emotionally and physically draining. Having a basic understanding of infant gut health and care strategies can be useful tools for any type of practitioner working with infants.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC

Melissa Cole is a board-certified lactation consultant, neonatal oral-motor assessment professional and clinical herbalist in private practice. Melissa is passionate about providing comprehensive, holistic lactation support and improving the level of clinical lactation skills for health professional. She enjoys researching and writing, especially on topics such tongue tie and botanical medicine.

Her bachelor’s degree is in maternal/child health and lactation and her master’s degree is in therapeutic herbalism. Before pursuing her current path, Melissa’s background was in education and cultural arts, which has served her well in her work as a lactation consultant and healthcare educator. She loves living, working and playing in the beautiful Pacific Northwest with her 3 children.

U.S.A. Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

This session will focus on common concerns regarding infant digestive health and useful support strategies that care providers can incorporate into their work with families. We will discuss what's normal and what's not in regards to stooling, spit up/reflux, colic/fussiness, and more. Many parents are coping with babies that are uncomfortable and unhappy due to gut health concerns. Dealing with a such a baby is emotionally and physically draining. Having a basic understanding of infant gut health and care strategies that optimize comfort and aid in overall digestive healing can be useful tools for any type of practitioner working with infants.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc
Abstract:

There is increasing evidence that the pattern of gut microbes affects a range of health and disease outcomes for both term and preterm infants. At birth, the gastro-intestinal tract is largely sterile, but rapidly becomes colonized by organisms in the environment, contact with the mother and from breast milk. The numerous advantages of breast milk throughout the life-course may be due, in part, to the patterns of early gut bacteria, and the interactions between milk, microbes and the immune system. These interactions are likely to be pivotal to the development of infections and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, a serious inflammatory gut complication) in preterm infants. Data show that early colonisation in preterm infants on NICUs is profoundly abnormal. However, knowing how these patterns are affected by milk type, immuno-nutrients (such as lactoferrin), antibiotics and probiotics is important as it may allow the design of strategies to improve health outcomes.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 20.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Abstract:

It has been 10 years since the Microbiome burst on the scene. In that time there has been a huge interest in the microbial world of the maternal-infant dyad. There appears to be a symbiotic microbial interplay between the two that has been playfully dubbed “The Oro-boobular-axis”. There is now solid evidence that the mother passes her microbiome to the infant as it passes through the birth canal and breastfeeds. There is also evidence that the baby passes their microbiome to the mother through “Retrograde inoculation”. This new understanding of human lactation is beginning to offer explanations to how some of the magic “benefits” of breastfeeding may actually be happening at a cellular and microbial level. It isn’t as well understood as some would have you believe, but it is an exciting new world to explore.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Meghan Azad is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Manitoba. She holds a PhD in Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, and completed postdoctoral training in Epidemiology and Pediatrics. Her research program is focused on the role of maternal and infant nutrition in the development and prevention of childhood obesity and allergic disease. Dr. Azad co-leads the Manitoba site of the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study (www.canadianchildstudy.ca), a national pregnancy cohort following 3500 children to understand how early life experiences shape lifelong health. She also co-leads the Population Health Pillar for DEVOTION (the Manitoba Developmental Origins of Chronic Disease Network – www.devotionnetwork.com). Dr. Azad serves on the Executive Council for the International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation, and the Breastfeeding Committee of Canada.

Abstract:

Cesarean delivery, perinatal antibiotics, and formula feeding are associated with increased risks of asthma and obesity later in childhood. These effects appear to be partially mediated by disruption of the gut microbiome – a complex microbial community that is established at birth and develops rapidly during infancy, influencing host immunity and metabolism throughout the lifespan. Breast milk drives “normal” gut microbiome development by providing a natural source of probiotic microbes and prebiotic oligosaccharides. These associations and mechanisms are being studied in The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) pregnancy cohort of 3500 infants followed from pre-birth through early childhood. Ongoing research in the CHILD cohort and recent evidence from other studies will be discussed.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Pam Douglas, MBBS, FRACGP, IBCLC, PhD

Dr. Pamela Douglas MBBS FRACGP IBCLC PhD is Medical Director of the Possums Clinic in Highgate Hill, Brisbane, Australia www.possumsonline.com, a charitable organisation whose multi-disciplinary services include specialised clinical care for mothers and babies, and education programs for both parents and health professionals. Pam is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Maternity Newborn and Families Research Collaborative at Griffith University, and Senior Lecturer at the Discipline of General Practice, The University of Queensland. She publishes research focussed on innovative clinical strategies for the support of parent-baby neurohormonal synchrony across the domains of feeds, sleep, crying and mood. Possums Education’s evidence-based programs for Neuroprotective Developmental Care (including the Gestalt Breastfeeding Online Program and The Possums Sleep Film) are rapidly influencing early life care both in Australia and internationally. Pam is also author of The discontented little baby book: all you need to know about feeds, sleep, and crying (UQP).

Australia Pam Douglas, MBBS, FRACGP, IBCLC, PhD
Abstract:

One in five families report that their baby cries excessively in the first few months of life – but many more introduce infant formula because of unsettled behaviour. Parents with babies who cry and fuss also report receiving a great deal of conflicting advice from health professionals, and are at increased risk of postnatal depression. In breastfed babies, back-arching, fussing during feeds, gas, excessively frequent feeding, excessively frequent night-waking, and crying are typically signs of unidentified breastfeeding problems. These signs are, however, often inappropriately medicalised and the baby is treated with pharmaceutical, oral surgical or maternal dietary interventions, which have been demonstrated not only to be ineffective, but risk worsened outcomes.
What do we need to look for in the baby with cry-fuss problems? What does the latest evidence tell us about the link between gut microbiota and crying? What interventions actually help? Join this talk to learn more about Neuroprotective Developmental Care for babies with cry-fuss problems.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Abstract:

Did you know that a mother who breastfeeds her child is more likely to “match” as an organ donor than a mother who does not breastfeed her child? How does that happen? The answer may lie in the Maternal-Newborn Microbiome, AKA “The Oro-boobular” axis. The scientific world is exploding with excitement over the discovery of the microbiome. While it appears clear that a suckling infant’s intestinal microbiome communicates with the mother’s lactocyte and perhaps beyond, little is known about the effects of this communication in practical terms. This presentation will review what is known and attempt to explain what it means, both now and in the future.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.