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Probiotics & Gut Microbiome Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Probiotics & Gut Microbiome for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Probiotics & Gut Microbiome online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Probiotics & Gut Microbiome education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Dr. Gayatri Jape, MD, FRACP, CCPU

Dr. Gayatri Jape is a fully qualified neonatal pediatrician with a collective experience of 18 years in Australia and overseas. She is a consultant neonatologist at King Edward Memorial Hospital (KEM), Perth in Australia. She also leads the neonatal follow up program at KEMH. Her special interests include gut microbiome, probiotics, neurodevelopment including autism. Her PhD focuses on probiotics, nutrition and long term neurodevelopment. Dr Jape is honorary research fellow at Telethon Kids Institute and leads the 'gut, nutrition and neurodevelopment' team.

Australia Dr. Gayatri Jape, MD, FRACP, CCPU
Abstract:

Recent advances in next generation sequencing have improved our understanding of the important role of gut microbiota in influencing brain development and function; i.e: 'gut-microbiota-brain' (GMB) axis. This is a bi-directional pathway where brain and gut microbes share detailed communications through immunological pathways, hormones and metabolites. GMB plays a crucial role in early brain development and function and impacts on long-term neurodevelopment and neurobehaviour. Understanding these roles is important to understand effective management and potentially prevention. This presentation will cover important aspects of GMB development, physiology, function and translation in clinical medicine for neonates and infants.

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Presentations: 14  |  Hours / CE Credits: 14.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Mariana Colmenares Castaño was born in Mexico City, and from an early age she was fascinated by animals and nature. She studied medicine at the National University of Mexico (UNAM), and found her passion as a pediatrician doing her residency at the National Pediatric Institute. With the birth of her first child, Mariana witnessed the lack of knowledge and commitment with breastfeeding and nutrition within the medical profession. This was her impetus to specialize in breastfeeding medicine. Certified as a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2011 by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE), she is currently a member of the International Lactation Consultant Association, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and a proud founding member of the National Lactation Consultant Association of Mexico (ACCLAM), where she served on the Board of Directors as Education Coordinator (2014-2019). Regional coordinator for the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine for the Región of LATAM (2018 to date) and an in coming board member 2019-2022. As part of her continuing professional training she studied at the International Breastfeeding Clinic, in Toronto CA.

Mariana is a member of the team for Breastfeeding Country Index BFCI, a project from Yale University and Universidad Iberoamericana whose goal is to develop an evidence base metric that can help decision-makers to understand the current status to elevate breastfeeding programs and increase breastfeeding rates. A frequent speaker at national and international conferences (plenary speaker at ILCA 2018), she has published numerous articles and co-authored a chapter for the National Academy of Medicine. To contribute to a medical profession better prepared to support breastfeeding, she teaches medical students at the National University of México and serves as a consultant for the National Health Institute and UNICEF.

Abstract:

Breastmilk must be the food for every human on earth. During the last decades we have been learning much more about the immunoprotective and immunomodulating properties of human milk, specifically colostrum. With advancements in neonatal care, we also have new challenges. As health care professionals it is an ethical responsibility to protect and promote breastfeeding practices for every family. Oral colostrum care is the use of own mother's colostrum in the cheeks and mouth of the baby not for a feeding purpose. It is an opportunity to initiate an immunological intervention in small or sick babies, allowing interaction of immunological properties with the linfoid tissue, promoting and improving microbiome and immune response. The mother and the family can also benefit from this intervention improving and enhancing integral participation and prevalence of breastfeeding in the long term.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc
Abstract:

Preterm infants are at increased risks of death and serious morbidity, although outcomes have improved significantly over the last 20 years. However, complications associated with gastrointestinal disorders, especially necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), and sepsis are increasingly important problems as respiratory care has improved. There is over-whelming data to support the use of mother’s own breastmilk, but only a few other interventions have shown important impacts on NEC and sepsis. However, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, large scale randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies all suggest that the administration of probiotics decrease the prevalence of NEC and sepsis, and improve other measures of gastrointestinal function such as enteral feed tolerance. Probiotics are live bacteria associated with a health benefit. Multiple different species and strains are considered to be ‘probiotics’ but only a few of these have been tested in high quality RCTs in preterm infants. This talk will review aspects of gut microbiota development, the interaction between breast milk nutrients and the microbiome and the role of probiotics. Methodological challenges associated with the interpretation of existing data will be discussed, and practical steps and considerations for the use of probiotics and potential risks will be considered.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.