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NICU Nutrition & Feeding Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for NICU Nutrition & Feeding for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These NICU Nutrition & Feeding online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This NICU Nutrition & Feeding education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States M. Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS, FASPEN

M. Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS, attended the University of Tennessee, College of Pharmacy in Memphis, Tennessee. She completed her PGY1 Pharmacy Residency at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania, and her PGY2 Pharmacy Residency in Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She is currently the Clinical Coordinator - Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and PGY1 Residency Program Director at Akron Children's Hospital where she provides clinical services and precepts pharmacy students, PGY1 pharmacy residents, and PGY3 medical pediatric residents. She is also the Section Lead for Specialty Care and an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED). Her didactic teaching is in the areas of pediatrics, women’s health, and nutrition. Dr. Cober's expertise is in pediatric pharmacotherapy, nutrition, ethanol lock therapy, and management of patients with intestinal failure. She is active in local, state, and national pharmacy organizations.

United States M. Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS, FASPEN
Abstract:

Critically ill neonates and infants are often unable to maintain adequate nutrition through the enteral route and require parenteral nutrition. Due to their increased nutritional needs, small size, and limited overall fluid intake, neonatal/infant parenteral nutrition requires specialized knowledge of stability and compatibility of parenteral nutrition macronutrients and micronutrients. Special attention will be given to issues involving protein requirements, glucose infuse rates, provision of lipid injectable emulsions utilizing newer products, calcium and phosphate compatibility, and challenges with limited intravenous access.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Brigit Carter, PhD, RN, CCRN

Dr. Brigit Carter, Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, joined the Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) in 2010. From 2015-2018 she served as the Director of the DUSON Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program. Dr. Carter earned her BSN at North Carolina Central University in 1998, a Master of Science in Nursing Education from University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2002 and PhD in Nursing from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2009. She served as project director for two HRSA Nursing Workforce Diversity grants. The current grant, The Academy for Academic and Social Enrichment and Leadership Development for Health Equity II, focus is to increase underrepresented minorities in nursing and understanding of individual social determinants among undergraduate nursing students. Dr. Carter teaches the DNP and ABSN programs.
Dr. Carter's clinical research focuses on nursing care of premature infants (<1500 grams) with feeding intolerance and identification of measurable methods for early detection of feeding intolerance. She continues her clinical practice as a staff nurse in the Duke University Hospital Intensive Care Nursery, where she has 21 years’ experience.
Dr. Carter retired in 1/2018 from the U.S. Navy as a Commander after 28 years of service.


USA Brigit Carter, PhD, RN, CCRN
Abstract:

Current methods used to identify feeding intolerance signs/symptoms in preterm infants rely heavily on nurses’ physical assessment and reporting of symptoms to the health care provider (HCP). Feeding intolerance, for the purposes of this discussion, is defined as “experiencing difficulty with the ingestion or digestion of formula or breast milk that causes a disruption in the current enteral feeding plan due to the manifestation of one or more of defined clinical symptoms including gastric residuals (>50% of feeding volume), abdominal distention, appearance of the abdomen (changes in color or suppleness), emesis and changes in the stool (minimal or lack of)” (Carter, 2012). It is critical to evaluate these assessment strategies to determine how reliable they are in identifying progression to feeding intolerance and more serious conditions such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Because the guidelines often vary by institutions, this can often be disadvantageous. However, the literature does provide some very consistent support and agreement on what is considered more reliable non-radiology measures that indicate a preterm infant is progressing to feeding intolerance. In addition, there are well known triggers for feeding intolerance that should be considered. There are also future methods, such as intra-abdominal pressure monitoring, that may be on the horizon for predicting feeding intolerance in preterm infants that are presently used in pediatric and adult populations.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Mari Viviers, PhD, MCommPath, RCSLT

Mari is currently a clinical academic working at Evelina London Children's Hospital in the UK. She is a Clinical Specialist Speech Language Therapist with various international peer reviewed articles on neonatal feeding assessment building on the body of research presented in her PhD. She has presented at various international conferences in the USA, Africa and Europe. Her experience entails paediatric dysphagia in the acute setting with specialization in critical care and neonatal care. In her previous position as an associate professor at a university in South Africa she invested in student clinician training in the NICU setting and access to evidence based treatment for feeding disorders in infancy. Her current research interest is in mobile health application development for the Neonatal Feeding Assessment Scale for international access to a validated neonatal feeding assessment tool to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neonates and young infants. In addition her second tier research path is looking at the role of the speech language therapist in PICU. To support the wider clinical and scientific community she is a member of the European Society for Swallowing Disorders as well as an international affiliate member of the Royal College of Speech Language Therapists.

UK Mari Viviers, PhD, MCommPath, RCSLT
Abstract:

A dearth of validated neonatal feeding assessment instruments are available in an era where medical teams are challenged to demonstrate the evidence base of the services that are provided to neonates. The Neonatal Feeding Assessment Scale (NFAS) was developed to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia with identification of subsequent airway invasion during feeding in neonates. This presentation will take the delegates on a journey through the landscape of evidence, the research process for developing the NFAS and how the NFAS can be used in everyday practice in the NICU to support better feeding outcomes for neonates within their family context.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

GB Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc
Abstract:

Survival in preterm infants has increased over the last few years, and this has been accompanied by an increasing focus on the importance of nutrition and the effects of preterm birth on later outcomes. Providing nutrition to sick preterm infants in the NICU is complex, and almost all preterm infants are discharged with growth outcomes (weight and length) considerably below their birth centiles. This is important because data show an association between poorer growth and nutritional status in the NICU, and worse longterm neurodevelopmental outcomes. Whilst greater efforts are required to improve nutritional status prior to discharge, the post-discharge setting represents a time period when brain growth is also rapid, and where the potential exists to improve outcome through nutritional interventions. However, the potential benefits of improved brain outcomes need to be considered alongside the possibility of metablic harm induced by excessively rapid growth which may increase risks of obesity and later chronic disease. This talk will consider the continued importance of breast milk after discharge, the potential role of fortifiers and supplements in meeting nutrient requirements, and issues around the timing of introduction of complementary foods.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Canada Michael Narvey, MD, FRCPC, FAAP

Dr. Narvey began his training in Pediatrics at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg where he completed a year of further training in Neonatology. This was followed by two years of Neonatal fellowship at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Afterwards he began his career as a Neonatologist in the same city and over the 6 years he spent there, his career included both clinical and administrative duties including 4 years as the Fellowship Program Director and two years as the Medical Director for a level II unit. In late 2010 he accepted a position in Winnipeg to become the Section Head of Neonatology and continues to hold this post. In 2016 he took on the additional role of Medical Director of the Child Health Transport Team. In 2015 he became a member of the Canadian Pediatric Society’s Fetus and Newborn Committee and in 2019 took over as Chair of the same.

His interests predominantly lie in the use of non-invasive technology to minimize painful procedures during an infants stay in the NICU. He is active on social media and has a passion for fundraising and is an active board member of the Children’s Hospital Foundation of Manitoba.

Canada Michael Narvey, MD, FRCPC, FAAP
Abstract:

Research supporting the use of exclusive human milk diets will be reviewed. From there we will look at the evidence for improving both short and long term outcomes and then determine what other options exist and where we might be headed in neonatal nutrition.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

Nancy is an attending Neonatologist with San Diego Neonatology, Inc. and is the Medical Director for Sharp HealthCare Lactation Services. She is board-certified in Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and has been an IBCLC since 1988. She is currently secretary/treasurer, education coordinator and web site co-editor for the San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition, which she helped found. Nancy is the Breastfeeding Coordinator for District IX, Chapter 3 of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is a past president of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and on the ILCA and HMBANA Advisory Boards. Her book, “Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU” was published in July 2008. She was awarded a 2014 Golden Wave Award by the California Breastfeeding Coalition for her efforts to reduce obstacles to breastfeeding in California. On a personal level, she is the wife of an architect/lawyer, mother of a 23 yr old (formerly breastfed) son, and mother to 4 golden retrievers and 1 cat.

U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP
Abstract:

The benefits of human milk for term infants are well recognized. Human milk is species-specific and has been adapted through evolution to meet the needs of the human infant, supporting growth, development, and survival. It has only been in the very recent past that significantly preterm infants have survived and that attention has been paid to the crucial role of nutrition in the long-term outcomes for these infants. Human milk is a complex fluid that simultaneously provides nutrients and bioactive components that facilitate the adaptive, functional changes required for the optimal transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. Preterm infants suffer not only from gastrointestinal immaturity, but also from functional immaturity of all organs and physiologic systems, as well as specific illnesses and complications, which further confound their transition from fetus to newborn. We will discuss the goals and methods of providing appropriate nutrition for NICU infants to promote optimal short and long term outcomes.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Preterm Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Dawn DiSalvo, MSN, NNP, CLC

I am a Board Certified Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and a Certified Lactation Counselor since 2010. I work in a 52 bed level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. As a bedside RN for 8 years I assisted in the advancement of our lactation program by hosting Lactation Counselor courses, developed the human mil technician role, and assisted in developing the hospital standards for donor milk use in preterm infants. I am currently the Clinical Leader in which my responsibilities include the development of our hospital-wide human milk for our 900 bed hospital, educate and train human milk technicians, and ensure all human milk in our institution is handled and stored according to the highest National standards.

U.S.A. Dawn DiSalvo, MSN, NNP, CLC
Abstract:

Even though we handle and store approximately 75,000 human milk containers per year we found significant inconsistencies in practice across our perinatal, pediatric, and adult units. In this presentation we will share practical, day to day strategies that we used to eliminate these inconsistencies and increase quality and safety related to handling and storing of human milk. We will discuss the development and implementation of our hospital-wide human milk room as well as the human milk technicians and the problems we overcame to make the program successful.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Preterm Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A Kathleen Gura, PharmD, BCNSP

Kathy Gura is the manager for Pharmacy Clinical Research Program and a clinical pharmacist with the Clinical Nutrition Service in the Division of GI/Nutrition at Boston Children's Hospital. She is also an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and an adjunct member of the faculty at MCPHS University, Northeastern University and the University of Connecticut. She is a member of the Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation and the Home PN Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Gura received her BS and Pharm.D from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Boston. Certified as a Nutritional Support Pharmacist, Dr. Gura is a Fellow of the ASHP, ASPEN, PPA and MSHP. She was recently named the 2020 Nutrition Champion by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Dr. Gura is the author of numerous book chapters on pediatric nutrition and has written more than 130 peer reviewed on topics such as the intestinal failure associated liver disease, clinical practice guidelines for parenteral nutrition, and the use of parenteral nutrition in the neonate. She currently serves as an associate editor for JPEN.

U.S.A Kathleen Gura, PharmD, BCNSP
Abstract:

Intravenous lipid emulsions (ILE) are essential for promoting optimal nutrition in the neonatal intensive care unit. However, long-term use of a pure soybean lipid emulsion has been associated with potentially fatal complications such as intestinal failure associated liver disease and fat overload syndrome. In the past decade, the science of lipid emulsions has progressed with a focus on optimizing nutrition and prevention of disease, Concerns on the use of these different oil sources on essential fatty acid status and growth will be discussed. By providing an overview of the current literature, this lecture will provide a general overview of the currently available ILE and how differences in composition may impact the neonate.

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Presentations: 12  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.