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GOLD Learning Speakers

UK

Wendy Jones, PhD, MRPharmS

  • Speaker Type: GOLD Midwifery 2017, Optimizing Milk Production Lecture Pack 2018, GOLD Learning Day 2020
  • Country: UK
Biography:

Wendy was one of the founder members of a UK charity the Breastfeeding Network. In her employed life she was a community pharmacist and also worked in doctor surgeries. She qualified as a pharmacist prescriber on primary prevention of coronary heart disease.

Wendy left paid work to concentrate on writing her books Breastfeeding and Medication (Routledge 2013, 2nd edition 2018), Breastfeeding for Dads and Grandmas (Praeclarus Press) and Why Mothers Medication Matters (Pinter and Martin). She co edited with Prof Amy Brown A guide to supporting breastfeeding for medical professionals (Routledge December 2019) and self published Breastfeeding and Chronic Medical Conditions in 2020.

Wendy is known for her work on providing a service on the compatibility of drugs in breastmilk and has been a breastfeeding supporter for 34 years. She is passionate that breastfeeding should be valued by all and that medication should not be a barrier. She has 3 daughters and 6 grandchildren all breastfed.

She was awarded a Points of Light award by the Prime Minister in 2018 and an MBE in the New Year’s Honours List 2018 for services to mothers and babies. She received her award at Windsor Castle in May 2019 from Her Majesty the Queen.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Breastfeeding And Medication: How To Make An Evidence Based Decision On Safety
In the past 21 years of providing support to breastfeeding mothers requiring medication I have found that many women are given information which isn’t based on evidence. Sharing decision-making is about being honest about the limits of knowledge and not just about healthcare professionals avoiding risk. To make an informed decision mothers need an unbiased explanation of options with benefits and risks about what is known about the medicine and its passage into breastmilk. Interrupting breastfeeding to take medication also has risks and we cannot ignore the difficulties that pumping and dumping, produce for the mother. I aim to provide the tools to evaluate the risks and benefits of prescribing and taking medication during breastfeeding and to discuss some of the more commonly encountered conditions where treatment is necessary to maintain a mother if full health to nurture and care for her baby.
Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Medications & Herbs
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Galactogogues and Breastfeeding
We know that the most common reason mums stop breastfeeding before they would otherwise choose is because they believe they don’t have enough breastmilk. In many cultures there a herbal remedies to increase milk supply. We have medicinal options available as well. What is the research behind the “magic wands”? Can any products cause harm rather than benefit? When should they be used and when is skilled breastfeeding support more important? Why is some populations is poor milk supply never a concern? Who is responsible for the perceived need to increase milk supply?
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Managing Milk Supply
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Implications of Drugs in Human Milk: The Substance-Exposed Infant
We are aware that an increasing number of babies are exposed to opiates, to methadone, to cannabis and cocaine through maternal breastmilk. In this presentation, I will discuss the pharmacokinetics of the medications and how this impacts the clinical care of the babies both immediately after delivery and later on. We need mothers to be open and honest about any drugs which they have taken in order that we may care for the baby appropriately if it is exhibiting clinical symptoms. This impacts on safeguarding issues but our aim should be to help the mother consider the impact on her baby using evidence-based information and to maintain breastfeeding appropriately. What are the long- and short-term implications of exposure for mother and baby? Is there sufficient research? As always, more questions than answers.
Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 6 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: Drug & Alcohol Use