Categories


-
  • Affordable Educational Credits
  • Watch At Your Convenience
  • Worldwide Speakers
  • Captivating Topics
  • Peer Interactions

Breastfeeding Complications Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Breastfeeding Complications for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Breastfeeding Complications online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Breastfeeding Complications education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter

Zainab Yate BSc, MSc (Medical Ethics & Law, Imperial College London, UK) is a biomedical ethicist, independent researcher and campaigner. She published the first peer-reviewed study looking specifically at breastfeeding/nursing aversion and agitation in 2017. Zainab is the leading international expert in Aversion and has recently published the only book on the topic with specialist publishers Pinter & Martin, London.

Zainab has been a breastfeeding peer supporter with the NHS for a number of years and is the owner of the only resource site for mothers and healthcare practitioners on aversion (www.breastfeedingaversion.com), where she researches and writes about aversion and why it arises. Zainab has helped thousands of women and families when breastfeeding triggers negative emotions, both Aversion and Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex, through her free structured support course and peer-to-peer support group online.

With a working background in public health and commissioning within the National Health Service (NHS), Zainab is currently vice-chair and named qualitative lead of the North London Research Ethics Committee, with the Health Research Authority (HRA) in the UK. Zainab is also a member of the King's College London Research Ethics, Governance Policy & Integrity Committee (KCL). In both roles, Zainab is a breastfeeding advocate and infant feeding research ethics expert for the committees.

United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter
Abstract:

Breastfeeding can trigger particular negative emotions and intrusive thoughts, these can include experiencing the phenomenon of breastfeeding/nursing aversion and agitation, or having the medical condition of Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex. Mothers. These don't preclude having postnatal depression or postnatal mood disorders.

Understanding the nuances and variations in all these conditions and symptoms can lead to better referral, intervention and treatment for those struggling with negative emotions associated with breastfeeding. Being prescribed antidepressants when you have D-MER or Aversion will not always alleviate the symptoms or help the situation.

We cover the literature about when breastfeeding can make someone feel bad, sad or mad, and what we know can help alleviate these negative emotions so as a lactation specialist or health care professional you will become well adept at assessing, referring, signposting, supporting and treating those who struggle. The information and skills you will gain will particularly help in complex cases or cases where there seems to be a missing link.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
Ireland Tamara Drenttel Brand, MA, MPH, IBCLC

Tamara Drenttel Brand, IBCLC, holds an MA in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Arizona and a Master’s in Public Health (MPH) from the American University of Beirut. An American by birth, but an expat in practice – she spent 10 years in the Middle East, where she worked as a public health practitioner, maternal and child health consultant and an IBCLC. She has had the privilege of working with breastfeeding dyads from all over the world in both in private practice and as a La Leche League Leader. In 2011, she founded and still actively facilitates “Mama 2 Mama Beirut Breastfeeding Support,” the largest breastfeeding peer support network in the Middle East.
Tamara founded and blogs for Galactablog.com – a site for lactation specialists and those aspiring-to-be. Galactablog features lactation program reviews, DIY breastfeeding ‘hacks’ and free/low-cost lactation resources and tips on private practice. She is currently developing a monthly podcast on the realities of running a lactation private practice around the world.
In her spare time, she is a furniture artist, avid upcycler and coffee connoisseur. She currently resides in a seaside village in Ireland with her family.

Ireland Tamara Drenttel Brand, MA, MPH, IBCLC
Abstract:

Mast Cell diseases are rare but still underdiagnosed. Even among specialists, there is a lack of consensus on terminology, diagnostic techniques and even diagnostic criteria. Clinically, mast cell diseases manifest in divergent ways. Triggers, symptoms, management and treatments differ widely from patient to patient. To date, there is no cure, just palliative management of this chronic, sometimes life-threatening condition. Because of this, there is a poor understanding of Mast Cell-related issues in the broader medical community, particularly in the realms of pregnancy, birth and lactation.
This webinar will provide participants with a general overview and understanding of the various types of Mast Cell Diseases including Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), Mast Cell Activation Disease (MCAD) and Mastocytosis. Participants will learn how to put this knowledge into practice to provide their Mast Cell clients with specialized, empathetic, and supportive care. It will discuss how to provide patient-centered care, the importance of coordinated care and the crucial role lactation specialists play within their client’s multidisciplinary health care team. It will examine Mast Cell treatments that are compatible with lactation.
Additionally, light will shed on approaches lactation specialists can utilize to empower their clients with the tools needed to establish and maintain the breastfeeding relationship desired, including helping clients manage their parenting and breastfeeding expectations given the limitations imposed by their disease.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
Italy Alice Farrow, BSc, IBCLC, Cert PPH

Alice Farrow is an IBCLC, writer, speaker, and infant feeding and health equity advocate. Parent of a child born with a cleft lip and palate, Alice has worked extensively, since 2006, with parents, parent organisations, cleft teams health providers and lactation specialists in order to increase awareness of the specific challenges faced by cleft affected infants and their families and to imprve access to adequate lactation support for this community.

Currently based in Rome, Italy, Alice advocates for, and teaches regularly on, the topic of breastfeeding/chestfeeding with an oral cleft via presentations, courses, articles, booklets and handouts and supports parents and professionals wordwide via their Cleft Lip and Palate Breastfeeding website and associated online support group, and in person and distance consultations.


Italy Alice Farrow, BSc, IBCLC, Cert PPH
Abstract:

A common misconception among care providers and families is that babies born with an oral cleft cannot breastfeed/chestfeed. This presentation corrects that misconception by exploring cleft types and their expected breastfeeding/chestfeeding outcomes and sharing tools that lactation specialists can use to more effectively support parents when their baby is born with a cleft lip/palate. In particular, during the neonatal period, the lactation specialist is uniquely positioned to support parents to make informed decisions about their feeding choices and create a going home care plan to help them achieve their breastfeeding/chestfeeding goals in the long term.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Alia Macrina Heise has worked in the field of lactation since 2004. She is considered the international authority on the topic of dysphoric milk ejection reflex (D-MER). She has been the forerunner in identifying, naming and investigating the anomaly of dysphoria with milk ejection reflex since 2007. She has spoken on the subject at many notable conferences, including GOLD, has given several interviews on the subject for both print and podcasts and has been published through her work on a case study about D-MER for The International Breastfeeding Journal. In 2017 she released the first book on the subject. Alia's passion and enthusiasm for the topic of D-MER are evident in the energy that she demonstrates in her presentations and the novelty of new information on a subject that is not yet well known or understood by many makes for an engaging and interesting presentation. Alia is not only a former sufferer of the lactation anomaly herself, she is also the webmaster of d-mer.org and she works closely with mothers around the world who are suffering with the condition in order to support them and to better understand the variance of the experience. She is also in frequent contact with other professionals in order to spread awareness and to support further research and investigation into the subject. Outside of her work with D-MER, she is also in private practice as an IBCLC in the Finger Lakes region of New York. She lives in a small rural town where she enjoys country living with her three children.

Abstract:

Dysphoric milk ejection reflex (D-MER), is not a new phenomenon. In the past, it was almost like Voldemort, the Problem That Must Not Be Named. But for over 10 years now, it has had a name and been brought into daylight. Though still not widely known or understood by many, the hypothesis of the mechanism and possible sustainable solutions are becoming better documented all the time. D-MER has been the subject of two case studies, one case series, and a qualitative research study. Two other studies as also in process at this time.

Mothers with D-MER feel, as a reflexive response with every single milk release, a wave of negative emotions ranging (depending on severity) from homesickness to hopelessness and despair, perhaps even anger and suicidal ideation. These emotions dissipate shortly after milk release and reoccur with the start of every MER, whether with breastfeeding, expressing or with spontaneous releases. Many sufferers keep the problem to themselves preferring the weaning of their baby to being incorrectly labeled as depressed or victims of abuse. Upon experiencing D-MER mothers are initially convinced the problem is physiological and not psychological, and they are correct.

As both a lactation consultant and a sufferer of D-MER, I first named and identified D-MER over 10 years ago. Now, through the case studies that have been done, collaboration with other medical and breastfeeding care providers, and the collection of information from the anecdotal reports from over 1,000 mothers, there is now a foundation of understanding of D-MER. Though the evidence base for D-MER is still mainly unestablished at this time, there are many professionals always working to bring evidenced-based information to the study of human lactation. This is exactly what the slow work and understanding of D-MER is about; the process of bringing new information into the light for further research and understanding.

In the PowerPoint presentation that I have to present, I discuss how D-MER presents, its tell-tale manifestation, and its spectrum and intensities. The presentation also explains the currently proposed mechanism of the MER anomaly, how health care providers can identify a mother it D-MER and how to help and support mothers with the condition.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Fedro Peccatori is a medical and gynecologic oncologist whose clinical activities mainly include diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, gynecological malignancies and tumors of young adults. He is Director of the Fertility and Procreation Unit within the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. His research projects deal with fertility preservation and counselling in young oncological patients, pregnancy associated cancers, pharmacological protection of ovarian function during chemotherapy, molecular characterization breast and gynecological malignancies. He’s part of the ESMO task force Adolescent and Young Adult and ESMO faculty member for breast cancer. At present, he acts as Scientific Director at the European School of Oncology (ESO), where he’s in charge of organizing and supervising international courses and masterclasses on different oncological issues.
He has been interested in breastfeeding in cancer patients since 2009 and has published a number of papers on this issue.

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor during reproductive age. Around 1/10000 nursing mothers are diagnosed with breast cancer every year. In this rare and difficult situation, patients and healthcare providers should be knowledgeable about the prognostic and practical implications of such an event. Chemotherapy may pass into the milk and breastfeeding is usually contraindicated during chemotherapy. Weaning should be gradual, to avoid breast inflammation and mastitis. A thorough psychological support should be given to the nursing mother to help her into the oncological trajectory.
On the other hand, the number of young breast cancer survivors is increasing and more and more patients enquire about the possibility of subsequent pregnancies and breastfeeding. The breast treated with conservative surgery and subsequent radiation is less responsive to hormonal stimulation, with reduced glandular hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Milk production is usually decreased in the previously affected breast and surgery may affect duct integrity. Nonetheless, each breast has the capability to self regulate milk production according to the baby’s suckling habits, and many evidences support the notion that one breast is enough. Specific education programs should focus on adequate baby positioning, correct latching and reinforcement of the advantages of on demand breastfeeding. Data from our group demonstrate the feasibility of breastfeeding after breast cancer, but qualified lactation counseling to support patients and caregivers is needed.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
Australia Lisa Amir, MBBS, MMed, PhD, IBCLC, FABM

Professor Lisa Amir is a general practitioner and has been an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant since 1989. She is the author of over 100 peer-reviewed articles on breastfeeding. She works in breastfeeding medicine at The Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. She is a Principal Research Fellow at Judith Lumley Centre, La Trobe University and is the Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, International Breastfeeding Journal.

Australia Lisa Amir, MBBS, MMed, PhD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

For over 20 years, Dr Lisa Amir has been seeing breastfeeding women with nipple and breast pain and infections. As a medical student she was taught that most clinical diagnoses are made by taking a careful history. Allowing the patient to tell their own story, while asking pertinent questions, usually reveals the likely cause of the problem. Careful physical examination, and occasional use of investigations, confirm the diagnosis. Using case studies from her breastfeeding medicine practice, Lisa demonstrates how to ask the right questions to correctly diagnose and treat nipple and breast problems. She will present case studies including mastitis, recurrent mastitis, breast abscess, and nipple and breast candida infection, and also discuss rare and unusual causes of nipple and breast pain and infection.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 23.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter

Zainab Yate BSc, MSc (Medical Ethics & Law, Imperial College London, UK) is a biomedical ethicist, independent researcher and campaigner. She published the first peer-reviewed study looking specifically at breastfeeding/nursing aversion and agitation in 2017. Zainab is the leading international expert in Aversion and has recently published the only book on the topic with specialist publishers Pinter & Martin, London.

Zainab has been a breastfeeding peer supporter with the NHS for a number of years and is the owner of the only resource site for mothers and healthcare practitioners on aversion (www.breastfeedingaversion.com), where she researches and writes about aversion and why it arises. Zainab has helped thousands of women and families when breastfeeding triggers negative emotions, both Aversion and Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex, through her free structured support course and peer-to-peer support group online.

With a working background in public health and commissioning within the National Health Service (NHS), Zainab is currently vice-chair and named qualitative lead of the North London Research Ethics Committee, with the Health Research Authority (HRA) in the UK. Zainab is also a member of the King's College London Research Ethics, Governance Policy & Integrity Committee (KCL). In both roles, Zainab is a breastfeeding advocate and infant feeding research ethics expert for the committees.

United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter
Abstract:

Aversion to breastfeeding or agitation while breastfeeding is known to occur in some women who breastfeed while pregnant, or who tandem feed a newborn and a toddler. However, it is a little researched area, and the paucity of published literature around breastfeeding aversion and agitation reveals a significant gap in the literature. My presentation presents the findings of an exploratory online survey that sheds light on what appears to be a commonly experienced phenomenon of aversion and agitation whilst breastfeeding, which varies in form, severity and duration. BAA is characterised by feelings of anger or rage, a skin crawling sensation and an urge to remove the suckling infant, but can also be feelings of agitation and irritability whilst the infant is latched. Mothers who experience BAA still continue to breastfeed, but have feelings of guilt and shame about BAA and are often confused about having feelings of BAA. Research is needed to understand the reasons for BAA, its causes, triggers and strategies to minimize the experience in breastfeeding mothers.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Meg is the mother of three breastfed boys and lives with her husband and children in QLD, Australia. She is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and works with parents to help them reach their breastfeeding goals. She has a degree in psychology and her prior work was is in counselling and sexual health. She was a La Leche League Leader (breastfeeding counsellor) for seven years before becoming an IBCLC. Meg is the author of two books including, "Boobin' All Day...Boobin' All Night. A Gentle Approach To Sleep For Breastfeeding Families". She has published articles in numerous parenting magazines and websites. She was also filmed for a short documentary, "Lactaboobiephobia", based on one of her blog posts which was released in 2016.

Abstract:

Breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome can bring many challenges to both mother and baby and many women are told they will be unable to breastfeed. This presentation will give examples of women who have faced different challenges breastfeeding their babies with Down Syndrome, yet had successful breastfeeding outcomes with the right support and information. This will include case studies with specific tips and suggestions that will help the lactation professional in offering support to these families. These women have faced many challenges including; prematurity, low muscle tone, breastfeeding into toddlerhood and a toddler who did not start breastfeeding until his mother had another baby when he was 2 ½ years old! This presentation will cover the most common challenges that families face when breastfeeding a baby with this condition and the possible solutions for them.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.