Webinar

Lactation Conference 2014

Originally offered 2014 at our GOLD Lactation Conference.It is a resource suitable for all skill levels and is a perfect fit for IBCLC's, Lactation Consultants, Nurses, Lactation Educators, Breastfeeding Counselors, Mother to Mother (Peer to Peer) Support Workers, Midwives, Physicians, Dietitians, Doulas, Childbirth Educators and anyone else working or studying within the maternal-child health industry.

$255.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 22.25   Access Time: 8 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (28):
Durations: 60 mins
Rachelle Lessen, MS, RD, IBCLC
Sara Lake, J.D., CAE
Demystifying Professional Certification Examination Development
USA Rachelle Lessen, MS, RD, IBCLC

Rachelle is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® and a Registered Dietitian with a Masters of Science degree in health education. She has worked as a lactation consultant at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia since 1996 when she established the Lactation Support Program. Rachelle provides lactation consults for families of patients admitted to the hospital and assists mothers and babies with breastfeeding. She counsels families in the Fetal Heart Program prenatally to offer support and guidance related to breastfeeding an infant with congenital heart disease. She also has an outpatient clinic to help mothers with breastfeeding challenges. She specializes in nutrition-related problems including food allergies and poor growth. Rachelle is the co-author of the ILCA publication “Risks of Not Breastfeeding” and the ADA Position Statement on Breastfeeding. Rachelle has served on the Board for the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®) since 2009 and currently serves as Chair. She breastfed four children and has five grandchildren, all of whom were breastfed.

Sara Blair Lake, J.D., CAE serves as Executive Director of the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®), a global certification program with over twenty-six thousand certificants in ninety-six countries. She also serves as an ex officio Board member to the Monetary Investment for Lactation Consultant Certification (MILCC), an affiliated charitable organization which provides scholarships to individuals in need of financial support to pursue careers in lactation consulting.

Sara also currently serves on the International Section Council of the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) and Chair of the 2014 Program Committee for the Annual Conference of the Institute for Credentialing Excellence. She has held senior positions with credentialing and association organizations for the past fifteen years and previously served as Chair for her own certification governing body, the Certified Association Executive (CAE) Commission of ASAE. Sara presents extensively regarding credentialing and association management, particularly in the international arena.

Objective 1: The viewer will gain an understanding of the general process for the development of certification examinations.
Objective 2: The viewer will be able to define what a practical analysis is.
Objective 33: The viewer will be able to define what an examination blueprint entails.

USA Rachelle Lessen, MS, RD, IBCLC
Abstract:

The development of a professional certification examination is a laborious and intensive process. Due to security issues, details regarding the development of specific examinations cannot be completely transparent. However, the general process for the development of certification examinations should be a public and transparent topic. While every certification examination is unique, the development process for most professional certification examinations following best practices is somewhat similar. If you have ever wanted to know about how professional certification examinations are developed, what the process involves or how professional certification examinations differ from other types of examinations, this is the session for you! Hear from the Chair and Executive Director of the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE) on this relevant topic.

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Durations: 70 mins
Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA
What Mothers Need to Exclusively Breastfeed
U.S.A. Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA, is author of the professional books, Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple and its Pocket Guide Edition. She co-authored (with Kathleen Kendall-Tackett) the popular book for parents, Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers. She is also author of the tiny 2013 troubleshooting guide, Breastfeeding Solutions: Quick Tips for the Most Common Nursing Challenges and the Breastfeeding Solutions smartphone app. Nancy began working with breastfeeding families in 1982 and became board-certified as a lactation consultant in 1991. From 1993 to 2003 she founded and maintained a large private lactation practice in the Chicago area. In 2008 the International Lactation Consultant Association officially recognized her contributions to the field of breastfeeding by awarding her the designation FILCA, Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association. Nancy was one of the first group of 16 to be recognized for their lifetime achievements in breastfeeding.

Objective 1: The learner will be able to define the various types of torticollis
Objective 2: The learner will be able to discuss the way in which torticollis presents in the infant’s structure and function and in turn the way it impacts breastfeeding
Objective 3: The learner will be able to identify three key strategies for supporting breastfeeding when torticollis is present in the infant

U.S.A. Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Increasing the rate of exclusive breastfeeding is a public-health priority that can improve health outcomes of mothers and babies. Of the identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding, few are more challenging than those related to mothers’ belief in their ability to breastfeed and their unrealistic expectations of breastfeeding and baby behavior. Learn how a woman’s breastfeeding self-efficacy impacts her feeding decisions, and how the research on self-efficacy should inform our strategies when working with families. Learn also why so many mothers supplement with formula, the role of culture in this decision, and some evidence-based strategies for addressing these issues.

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Durations: 58 mins
Dr. Frank Nice, RPh, DPA,CPHP
Domperidone and Breastfeeding
U.S.A. Dr. Frank Nice, RPh, DPA,CPHP

Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 35 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Masters and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He practiced at the NIH for 30 years and currently serves as a project manager at the FDA.Dr. Nice has organized and participated in over a three dozen medical missions to the country of Haiti. He retired from the US Public Health Service after 30 years of distinguished service. Dr. Nice has published over three dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding, in addition to articles and book chapters on the use of power, epilepsy, and work characteristics of health care professionals. He continues to provide consultations, lectures, and presentations to the breastfeeding community and to serve the poor of Haiti.

Objective 1: Explain the orphan drug process for domperidone and describe the rare disease, hyoprolactinemia
Objective 2: Understand the scientific and clinical rational for the use of domperidone
Objective 3: counsel breastfeeding mothers on the use of domperidone

U.S.A. Dr. Frank Nice, RPh, DPA,CPHP
Abstract:

Domperidone currently is used worldwide as an anti-nausea agent for adults, children, and women. It is currently available in 60 countries including Canada and Mexico. Domperidone was recently given orphan drug designation for the treatment of hypoprolactinemia in breastfeeding. Over 60,000 cases of hypoprolactinemia are reported annual in the United States. Infants who do not receive human milk cost the healthcare system over $13 billion each year and result in over 900 unnecessary infant deaths annually. Domperidone can produce significant increases in prolactin with subsequent increases in milk production. No drug is currently approved for the condition of hypoprolactinemia of lactation in any country.

This presentation will describe and explain the Orphan Drug Act and the steps necessary for domperidone to receive approval under the Act. Prolactin facts will be discussed as well as a review of the rare disease, hypoprolactinemia. The scientific rationale for the use of domperidone will be covered. Practical information will be presented on domperidone dosing and withdrawal of the drug with sufficient milk supply and with insufficient milk supply.

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Durations: 69 mins
Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC, FILCA
Getting a Better Grip on Prolactin
U.S.A. Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC, FILCA

Lisa Marasco has been working with breastfeeding mothers for over 20 year, first as a La Leche League Leader and then as an IBCLC since 1993. She holds a Master’s degree in Human Development with specialization in Lactation, is a designated Fellow of ILCA, and co-authored The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide to Making More Milk. Lisa is currently employed by WIC of Santa Barbara County and serves on the board of the Breastfeeding Coalition of Santa Barbara County

Objective 1:Describe the normal prolactin curve from pre-conception through the end of lactation
Objective 2: Name one positive and one negative influence on prolactin levels during lactation
Objective 3: List at least 3 factors to take into account when evaluating prolactin test results

U.S.A. Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Prolactin is considered to be a key hormone for lactation, yet our knowledge has been surprisingly sparse. It is necessary for pubertal and pregnancy mammary development as well as milk synthesis. While prolactin level does not correlate directly to milk production, lactation fails without it. This talk will take a closer look at current research and what we do and do not yet understand about prolactin. We will then examine specific cases and discuss the process of elimination as well as possible strategies for affected mothers.

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Durations: 52 mins
Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
It Wasn’t Supposed to be Like This: Traumatic Birth, Traumatic Stress, and Breastfeeding
U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM

Cynthia Good Mojab, MS Clinical Psychology, is a Clinical Counselor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, author, researcher, and internationally recognized speaker. She is also Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. As one of a small group of mental health care providers in the world who are also IBCLCs, she has a strong interest in lactational psychology. She is the Director of LifeCircle Counseling and Consulting, LLC where she focuses on perinatal mental health care. She formerly served as Research Associate in the Publications Department of La Leche League International and was on the faculty of Parkland College. She has authored, contributed to, and provided editorial review of numerous publications related to breastfeeding, culture, and psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations to help participants better understand and more effectively respond to the complex psychosocial realities of breastfeeding families living in diverse contexts.

Objective 1: List four types of racism.
Objective 2: Explain why learning how to recognize and undo racism is a fundamental part of developing cultural competence for lactation specialists.
Objective 3:List 3 examples of institutional racism in the field of breastfeeding support.
Objective 4: Describe 3 steps that white lactation specialists can take to help reduce institutional racism in breastfeeding support.

U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
Abstract:

Up to one third of mothers report experiencing birth trauma and postpartum symptoms of traumatic stress. Birth is traumatic when mothers experience or perceive a threat to life, serious injury, or threat to physical integrity (for themselves or their baby) or experience the death of their baby. Pre-existing risk factors and birth-related risk factors for traumatic birth are staggeringly common. Childbirth trauma and postpartum traumatic stress negatively impacts mothers and their babies, and can result in the undermining of breastfeeding, additional grief over the loss of breastfeeding, and increased health risks for mother and baby. This session offers a sensitive discussion of how traumatic birth experiences affect maternal mental health, mothering, breastfeeding, and lactation consulting. It includes the importance of recognizing the difference between postpartum depression and postpartum stress disorders in new mothers, screening mothers for traumatic stress, and referring potentially traumatized mothers for diagnosis and possible treatment.

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Durations: 54 mins
Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE
Epigenetics and Breastfeeding: The Potential Longterm Impact of Breastmilk
USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD is Executive Director of Lactation Programs for CAPPA,the Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association. She owns MotherJourney, focusing on training perinatal professionals on integrative and holistic information regarding pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. She has her degree in Maternal Child Health: Lactation Consulting and is an internationally board certified lactation consultant. Wilson is the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever. She loves to blend today’s recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for more than two decades and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into motherhood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

Objective 1: Define genome and epigenome
Objective 2: Identify at least one way breastmilk can potentially influence the epigenome of a baby.
Objective 3: Identify two ways that epigenetics can influence gut flora.

USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE
Abstract:

Recent research on epigentics has led medical professionals to query about how the environment impacts the developing baby both in utero and throughout its lifetime. The genome is the genetic information inherited from one's parents, but the epigenome is what determine how the genome is expressed. This deciphering process is effected by both the internal and external environment of an individual, including nutrition. Researchers are discovering that these epigenetic changes can influence not only one but multiple generations. The first nutrition for a human outside the womb is breastmilk, and thus the epigenetic impact of breastfeeding has long reaching potential. Discover the results of some of the latest research in the field of epigenetics and breastmilk - milksharing/wet nursing, breastmilk and epigenetic influence, and changes in gene expression and gut flora.

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Durations: 54 mins
Raising Our Voice: Breastfeeding Advocacy for Health Care Providers, Professionals, and Volunteers'

Kimberly Seals Allers is an award-winning journalist, author and a nationally recognized commentator, consultant and advocate for breastfeeding and infant health. A former writer at FORTUNE and senior editor at Essence magazine, Kimberly’s thoughtful and provocative online commentaries on motherhood and infant health and the intersection of race, class and culture, received over 10 million page views last year.

In addition, Kimberly specializes in issues related to African American motherhood and breastfeeding. In March 2012, she launched Black Breastfeeding 360°, a first of its-kind online multi-media content library on the black breastfeeding experience. She is author of The Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy (Amistad/HarperCollins) a hip and informative African American pregnancy guidebook and two other Mocha Manual™ books in the series. She is the founder of MochaManual.com, a pregnancy and parenting destination and blog for African Americans and former editorial director of The Black Maternal Health Project of Women’s eNews.

Kimberly is a graduate of New York University and Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. A divorced mother of two, she lives in Queens, New York City, with her children and two turtles.

Objective 1: Identify 3 main types of advocacy
Objective 2:Be able to describe success strategies for each type of advocacy work
Objective 3:Identify the elements of successful storytelling
Objective 4: Identify the components of a media advocacy plan and how to measure effectiveness
Objective 5: Identify the factors for cultural competence in advocacy efforts

Abstract:

You have a voice. Amplify it! Mothers need education and support beyond the hospital setting.

Today’s advocacy landscape involves engaging with mothers and families across a variety of channels. This may seem daunting for any individual or organization to manage on their own, considering the limited resources, the volume of competing conversations and the myriad of engagement channels out there. How can the breastfeeding movement effectively communicate critical messaging, easily build “brand advocates” and use media, social media and other avenues to amplify our voice across the social networks?

This advocacy training presentation will explore six key steps to hone advocacy skills for amplifying breastfeeding messaging and outreach across communities. It will explore the fundamentals of powerful advocacy from creating compelling narratives to building a foundation of understanding. It will illustrate the role of media, the legislative process and community organizing. Attendees will be able to understand the power of storytelling and describe simple ways to increase the relevancy of their message and make sure the message is being received. It will improve cultural competency in speaking to various communities and attendees will have an interactive opportunity for role play and to being creating a personal or organizational strategic advocacy plan.

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Durations: 46 mins
Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
Unpacking the Invisible Diaper Bag of White Privilege: An Overview of Racial Inequities in Breastfeeding Support
U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM

Cynthia Good Mojab, MS Clinical Psychology, is a Clinical Counselor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, author, researcher, and internationally recognized speaker. She is also Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. As one of a small group of mental health care providers in the world who are also IBCLCs, she has a strong interest in lactational psychology. She is the Director of LifeCircle Counseling and Consulting, LLC where she focuses on perinatal mental health care. She formerly served as Research Associate in the Publications Department of La Leche League International and was on the faculty of Parkland College. She has authored, contributed to, and provided editorial review of numerous publications related to breastfeeding, culture, and psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations to help participants better understand and more effectively respond to the complex psychosocial realities of breastfeeding families living in diverse contexts.

Objective 1: List four types of racism.
Objective 2: Explain why learning how to recognize and undo racism is a fundamental part of developing cultural competence for lactation specialists.
Objective 3: List 3 examples of institutional racism in the field of breastfeeding support.
Objective 4: Describe 3 steps that white lactation specialists can take to help reduce institutional racism in breastfeeding support.

U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
Abstract:

White lactation specialists and white-dominated breastfeeding institutions in the US and other societies are vulnerable to manifesting racial bias—even unintentionally—due to their unseen and unearned white privilege and power. Antiracism work is an inherent part of avoiding bias and developing cultural competence, an ethical obligation of many lactation specialists and an inherent part of fulfilling institutional missions to serve mothers without discrimination. This session 1) provides an overview of the impact upon breastfeeding of racial inequities in health status, birth experience, maternal and infant perinatal outcomes, health care, employment, education, housing, and access to effective breastfeeding support and information that result from individual, institutional, and systemic racism, 2) helps participants understand how white privilege and power create racial inequities in breastfeeding support, and 3) invites participants to recognize and embrace their individual and collective responsibility to help dismantle institutional racism in the field of breastfeeding support.

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Durations: 53 mins
Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE
The Milk Sharing Conundrum - The Grey Area Between Scope and Need
USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD is Executive Director of Lactation Programs for CAPPA,the Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association. She owns MotherJourney, focusing on training perinatal professionals on integrative and holistic information regarding pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. She has her degree in Maternal Child Health: Lactation Consulting and is an internationally board certified lactation consultant. Wilson is the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever. She loves to blend today’s recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for more than two decades and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into motherhood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

Objective 1: Define wet nursing and donor milk.
Objective 2: Identify 2 ways in which the process of accessing donor human milk is different from share milk.
Objective 3: Identify at least two reasons mothers may need access to shared milk who may not have access to donor milk.
Objective 4: Identify at least 2 risks to infant of artificial milk.
Objective 5:Identify at least two serious issues to contemplate when mothers access share milk.List at least three things that are important to screen for prior to accessing share milk.
Objective 6: Identify the four pillars of Milk Sharing.
Objective 7: Identify at least three online resources for families in need of breastmilk for their children.
Objective 7:Define professional scope of practice in terms of milk sharing.

USA Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CLD, CCCE
Abstract:

All human babies have the right to breastmilk exclusivity. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways - breastfeeding, expressed breastmilk via a feeding device, or pasteurized donor human milk. Recently there has been much attention placed on the traditional, though professionally frowned upon, practice of informal milk peer to peer milk sharing. The increasing popularity of milk sharing via social media, the growing attention on the importance of breastmilk exclusivity, the increasing awareness of potential dangers of artificial milk, and the inability for donor milk banks to provide donor milk for more than those in critical need has led professionals and families to an impass. Even though some professionals have warned against the practice, its use is becoming more widespread. Finding policy and recommended practices can be difficult. This presentation reviews the current challenges and realities of milk sharing while helping professionals provide best practice recommendations.

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Durations: 68 mins
Alyssa Schnell, MS, IBCLC
Breastfeeding Without Birthing: Breastfeeding for Mothers Through Adoption, Surrogacy, or Foster Care
U.S.A. Alyssa Schnell, MS, IBCLC

Alyssa has been helping mothers and babies in the St. Louis area with breastfeeding for the past 12 years. She is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and a La Leche League Leader. Alyssa enjoys working with all mothers and babies, but she has an extra special place in her heart for helping mothers through adoption and surrogacy to breastfeed their babies. She is the author of the newly released book, Breastfeeding Without Birthing, devoted to these special mothers. Alyssa is the proud mother of three breastfed children, two by birth and one by adoption.

Objective 1:The learner will be able to identify who are the mothers who breastfeed without giving birth
Objective 2:The learner will be able to explain to others why breastfeeding in the case of adoption, surrogacy, or (in some cases) foster care is important
Objective 3:The learner will be able to facilitate mothers in establishing a support network
Objective 4: The learner will be able to be able to demonstrate how to help the mother of a non-latching baby to breastfeed
Objective 5:The learner will be able to explain the process of inducing lactation
Objective 6:The learner will be able to list how, how much, and with what to supplement breastfeeding
Objective 7: The learner will be able to recollect the speaker’s experience breastfeeding without birthing

U.S.A. Alyssa Schnell, MS, IBCLC
Abstract:

Breastfeeding is important for all mothers and babies, even when (and possibly especially when) the baby arrives from another mother’s womb. Increasingly, mothers through adoption, surrogacy, and foster care are interested in nursing their babies. By providing support and helpful information, lactation professionals can play a key role in breastfeeding success for these special dyads. Breastfeeding without birthing mothers may need help latching their babies and/or inducing lactation. Specific tools for latching and protocols for inducing lactation will be presented. Many of these mothers will also need support in supplementing their milk production. Adoptive, intended, and foster mothers can successfully nurse their babies with good support and by approaching breastfeeding based on their own individual values and circumstances.

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Durations: 55 mins
Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Traumic Life Experiences and how they Affect the Breastfeeding Mother
USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE

Dianne Cassidy is a Lactation Consultant in Rochester, New York with Advanced Lactation Certification.  Dianne works in Private Practice, and in a busy Pediatrician office supporting mothers and babies. She also teaches prenatal breastfeeding and childbirth in the hospital setting.  In the fall of 2013, Dianne completed her MA in Health and Wellness/Lactation.  She is dedicated to serving mothers and babies, and has the unique ability to identify with the needs and concerns of new mothers.  Dianne has worked extensively with women who have survived trauma, babies struggling with tongue tie, birth trauma, milk supply issues, attachment, identifying latch problems, returning to work and breastfeeding multiples.

Dianne has 3 biological children, including twins, 3 step children and a wonderful husband.  Dianne is an author and public speaker and enjoys teaching caregivers how to support new families through breastfeeding struggles.

Objective 1: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to Identify types of trauma
Objective 2: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to identify if a new mother is a trauma survivor
Objective 3: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to Identify ways to support the mother/baby dyad
Objective 4:After completing this activity, the learner will be able to be aware of ethical implications

USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Abstract:

The American Academy of Pediatrics, along with Healthy People 2020 and the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative has all identified the fascinating benefits associated with breastfeeding for both mother and baby, but there are still some strong barriers to breastfeeding. Research and case studies have associated how child sexual abuse, intimate partner violence and birth trauma suffered by the mother and baby can interfere with breastfeeding. Impact from this type of trauma can intensify during pregnancy and lead to breastfeeding difficulties. Increased medical intervention during labor and delivery has led to an upsurge of birth trauma, which can delay or reduce initial breastfeeding. This presentation identifies how trauma, either endured by mother, baby, or both, can lead to failure to initiate breastfeeding, latch issues, milk supply problems, painful feeds and early cessation of breastfeeding. This presentation will help the provider to detect the subtle signs of trauma.

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Durations: 63 mins
Caroline Kruger, LLM, IBCLC
Concept of Antifragility applied to breastfeeding, milk production and breastfeeding counseling
Netherlands Caroline Kruger, LLM, IBCLC

Caroline Kruger read notarial civil law at Groningen University (NL) and worked in Rotterdam (NL) for one of the biggest law firms of The Netherlands, practicing family law and estate planning for close to ten years. Then she started a family. Her own journey in breastfeeding led her to read up on breastfeeding a lot. She began the VBN training for peer-to-peer breastfeeding counseling and also volunteered at a local hospital. She went to Artevelde Hogeschool in Ghent (BEL) to follow lectures by Gonneke Veldhuizen-Staas (amongst others). She then assisted the start up of the only milk bank in The Netherlands (while still in Rotterdam). After the milk bank moved to Amsterdam, she started her private practice Nultien Borstvoeding.

Objective 1: Introduction to concept of Antifragility
Objective 2: What retracts or reinforces Antifragility of breastfeeding
Objective 3: Antifragility also informatis how to read evidence

Netherlands Caroline Kruger, LLM, IBCLC
Abstract:

Taleb introduces the concept of Antifragility in his 2012 book. This presentation applies this concept to breastfeeding, counseling and research.

Antifragile are systems that evolve and improve after crises instead of breaking. Breastfeeding has survived evolution and is therefor antifragile. What interferes with breastfeeding’s antifragility and makes it robust or less than robust: fragile (at a population level and at the level of N=1)

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Durations: 68 mins
Dr. Kartikeya Bhagat, Ob/Gyn (FICOG), IBCLC
Dr. Prashant Gangal, MD, DCH, IBCLC
Breastcrawl: from Science to Implementation
India Dr. Kartikeya Bhagat, Ob/Gyn (FICOG), IBCLC

Dr. Bhagat is a Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist practicing at Kandivli, a western Suburb of Mumbai. He has been running Grace Maternity and Nursing Home, a Baby Friendly Maternity Service, for the past 22 years. Hon. Asst. (Obst & Gyn )at Akurli Road Municipal Maternity Home since June 1994 and Borivli Municipal Maternity Home from 1996 till 2010.

Dr. Bhagat is also a founding member and currently the Past-President of The Association of Fellow Gynaecologists, an organization representing practicing Gynaecologists from the suburbs of Mumbai. He has given many lectures, conducted workshops all over the country and contributed chapters to a number of publications on Optimising Labour and Delivery for Safe Motherhood, Caesarean Section: the Misgav Ladach technique, Active Management of the 3rd stage of labour, Post Partum Haemorrhage, Medical Disorders in Pregnancy, Breastfeeding; Breast Crawl and Neonatal Resuscitation.

Dr. Gangal is a Practicing Pediatrician in Mumbai for last 25 years. He has also been Mother Support & Training Coordinator of BPNI Maharashtra since 1995, Co-Coordinator of Mother Support Task Force of WABA since 2003 & Lactation Consultant since 2009.

Dr. Gangal was trained in lactation management by Dr. Felicity Savage and has been a breastfeeding trainer and advocate for over 2 decades. He was instrumental in establishing the first Mother Support Group in India (1995) and played a key role in training 500 Traditional Massage Women in Mumbai , Breast crawl rejuvenation (video, dossier and website), training thousands of Government health care providers in 5 Indian States with an innovatively written module in collaboration with UNICEF and organizing IBLCE exam for the first time in India (2009). He made significant contributions to LLLI publication ‘Hirkani’s Daughters’

Dr. Gangal has multiple publications to his credit and was a speaker at LLLI conferences in San Francisco and Chicago. He was honored with Lifetime Achievement Award by Mumbai Breastfeeding Promotion Committee in 2008 and WABA Secretariat award in 2010.

Objective 1: Description of Breast Crawl
Objective 2:Neuro-Endocrine events during Breast Crawl
Objective 3: Advantages of Intitiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl
Objective 4: Practical Problems in Implementing Breast Crawl

India Dr. Kartikeya Bhagat, Ob/Gyn (FICOG), IBCLC
Abstract:

The phenomenon of Breast Crawl is unique due to multitude of Neuro-Endocrine components in the baby and the synchronized Neuro-Endocrine platform provided by the mother. The scientific details will help the Health Care Providers to understand the reasoning behind dos and don’ts for successful implementation of Breast Crawl. Addressing the obstacles to initiate breastfeeding by Breast Crawl in any maternity set up is a challenge for administrators as well public health experts. It is time that WHO and UNICEF declare Breast Crawl as the universally recommended method to initiate breastfeeding because that is exactly the process described in revised BFHI documents. Breast Crawl phenomenon is also a rich fertile ground for many research avenues like breastfeeding success, neuro-motor development, neonatal mortality, bonding etc. The entire spectrum from initiation with Breast Crawl and Baby Led Attachment to KMC in pre-term as well as full term newborns is worth exploring.

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Durations: 55 mins
Dr. Alison Hazelbaker, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA, RCST
What Does Torticollis Have to do with Breastfeeding?
U.S.A. Dr. Alison Hazelbaker, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA, RCST

Dr. Hazelbaker has 30 years of experience specializing in cross-disciplinary treatments using specialized training in several modalities to best assist her clients. She is a certified Craniosacral Therapist, a Lymph Drainage Therapy practitioner, and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. Earning her Master’s Degree in Human Development specializing in Human Lactation from Pacific Oaks College, Dr. Hazelbaker received her doctorate in Psychology from The Union Institute and University. Her original research on tongue-tie, in 1993, has changed clinical practice both in the USA and abroad. She authored the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function (ATLFF) which remains the only research-based tongue-tie screening process in infants under 6 months. Recently, Dr. Hazelbaker revised her Master’s thesis on tongue-tie into a comprehensive book on the condition titled: Tongue-tie: Morphogenesis, Impact, Assessment and Treatment published by Aidan and Eva Press. More information can be found at www.aidanandevapress.com.

Objective 1: Define torticollis.
Objective 2: Discuss an assessment strategy.
Objective 3: Discuss various treatment strategies.

U.S.A. Dr. Alison Hazelbaker, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA, RCST
Abstract:

Torticollis, an abnormal foreshortening of the fascia of the neck that causes a head tilt, presents unique challenges to breastfeeding. Unfortunately, the incidence of this formally rare condition is on the rise. Dr. Hazelbaker discusses the causes of the condition, explains the assessment process and presents multiple therapeutic strategies for resolving torticollis in infants. She uses video to show both the assessment and treatment process in action.

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Durations: 58 mins
Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Epidural Anesthesia and its Impact on Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration
USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE

Dianne Cassidy is a Lactation Consultant in Rochester, New York with Advanced Lactation Certification.  Dianne works in Private Practice, and in a busy Pediatrician office supporting mothers and babies. She also teaches prenatal breastfeeding and childbirth in the hospital setting.  In the fall of 2013, Dianne completed her MA in Health and Wellness/Lactation.  She is dedicated to serving mothers and babies, and has the unique ability to identify with the needs and concerns of new mothers.  Dianne has worked extensively with women who have survived trauma, babies struggling with tongue tie, birth trauma, milk supply issues, attachment, identifying latch problems, returning to work and breastfeeding multiples.

Dianne has 3 biological children, including twins, 3 step children and a wonderful husband.  Dianne is an author and public speaker and enjoys teaching caregivers how to support new families through breastfeeding struggles.

Objective 1: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to identify the relationship between epidural anesthesia during labor and delivery
Objective 2: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to identify the relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding initiation and duration
Objective 3:After completing this activity, the learner will be able to Identify techniques to support the breastfeeding mother who delivered a baby using medical intervention
Objective 4: After completing this activity, the learner will be able to be aware of ethical implications

USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Abstract:

Epidural use during labor has been increasing over the last several years. Along with the increase in epidural use, we have also seen an increase in cesarean deliveries, breastfeeding issues, and a decrease in breastfeeding duration. Increasing breastfeeding support to women who desire a medicated delivery may help to increase breastfeeding rates overall. This presentation will help the provider to become more aware of the possible negative effects that may prevail when epidural use during labor and delivery is promoted as safe for both mother and baby. Women should have the opportunity to make an informed decision about their medical care. It is the responsibility of providers who are working with new mothers and babies to recognize when breastfeeding is affected by medical intervention and are able to offer proper support.

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Durations: 53 mins
Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC
Exclusively Breastfeeding Triplets-Case Studies
Australia Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC

In between breastfeeding her youngest boy, chasing after her oldest two boys, blogging and occasionally sleeping; Meg works with women to help them reach their breastfeeding goals. Meg has a degree in Psychology and was a La Leche League Leader (breastfeeding counsellor) for seven years before becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She writes frequently on her website about all things breastfeeding, is a guest blogger and has published articles in “Nurture Parenting Magazine” and “Natural Mother Magazine”. Needless to say she passionate about helping women reach their breastfeeding goals and loves helping to get the word out about how women can do this! She places a huge emphasis on sharing evidenced based research without the sugary coating.

Objective 1: Identify the key factors as to why these two women succeeded in breastfeeding their triplets.
Objective 2:Identify the major barriers and challenges while trying to meet their breastfeeding goals.
Objective 3: Identify how to best support and encourage women who are breastfeeding their triplets, to meet their own individual breastfeeding goals.

Australia Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC
Abstract:

Exclusively breastfeeding triplets can seem to many an unattainable goal, yet two women in Australia have not only reached their goals of breastfeeding their triplets exclusively, but have surpassed their original expectations of what they could achieve. This presentation will focus on two case studies and includes pictures of them breastfeeding their triplets in various positions. Both women have been successful at reaching their breastfeeding goals and are currently breastfeeding into toddlerhood due to many factors which will be discussed. These include the woman’s strong desire and motivation to breastfeed; how their births influenced their breastfeeding experiences; what effect the level of support had on reaching their goals and; their own beliefs as to why they feel they have been successful. The presentation will include how we as health care providers can best support women with multiples to reach their breastfeeding goals.

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Durations: 60 mins
Dr. Virginia Thorley, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA
Breastfeeding can't save lives today – or can it?
Australia Dr. Virginia Thorley, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

Dr Virginia Thorley is a pioneer of the breastfeeding movement in Australia. She was the first breastfeeding counsellor in Queensland and in 1985 was in the first cohort in the world to certify IBCLC. In 2008 she was one of the first Fellows of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA). She has two Research Higher Degrees in History (MA and PhD) and her current research interests include influences on mothers' infant-feeding decisions, wet-nursing, milk-sharing and milk banking. Dr Thorley is an Honorary Research Fellow in the School of HPRC at the University of Queensland. She is the author of several books and book chapters and most recently was co-editor, with Melissa Vickers, of The 10th Step & Beyond: Mother Support for Breastfeeding. She has presented at conferences on five continents.

Objective 1: Understand the importance of breastfeeding, anywhere
Objective 2: Understand that a even a resource-rich region becomes resource-poor in a natural disaster or other emergency
Objective 3: Identify at least three factors impacting food security of non-breastfed infants
Objective 4: Reflect on examples/cases to improve own practice
Objective 5:Add food security to the reasons for supporting mothers to breastfeed

Australia Dr. Virginia Thorley, PhD, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Surely breastfeeding can't save lives today? What's unsafe about 'formula' feeding in a resource-rich region? These are common beliefs. Breastfeeding provides the infant's entire food needs for the first six months. The protection of life afforded by human milk at any age is important – everywhere. A resource-rich region can suddenly become resource-poor when a natural disaster, extreme weather or major civil upheaval strikes. Factors impacting the artificially-fed infant's food security are:
- dependence on transport of supplies from afar
- dependence on electricity or other fuel for boiling water, cleansing equipment, refrigeration
- dependence on unsafe water for reconstituting powdered 'formula' and hygienic preparation
- lack of support and privacy for mothers to relactate or access donor milk
- donation of 'formula' supplies – undermining breastfeeding

I shall now describe real experiences where breastfeeding saved the day and hypothetical scenarios based on fact.

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Durations: 61 mins
Lisa Amir, MBBS, MMed, PhD, IBCLC, FABM
Breast infections in breastfeeding women– case presentations of abscess, mastitis and more
Australia Lisa Amir, MBBS, MMed, PhD, IBCLC, FABM

Associate Professor Lisa Amir, MBBS MMed PhD IBCLC FABM FILCA, is a general practitioner and lactation consultant. She has been continually certified as an IBCLC since 1989. She works in breastfeeding medicine at The Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne and in private practice. She is a Principal Research Fellow at the Judith Lumley Centre (formerly known as Mother & Child Health Research), La Trobe University, Australia. She is the author of over 60 peer-reviewed articles, and the primary author of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine’s clinical protocol on mastitis. She is the Editor-in-Chief of International Breastfeeding Journal.

Objective 1: Recognise presenting signs and symptoms of breast infections, including mastitis, breast abscess, candida infection and other causes of nipple and breast pain
Objective 2: Take a history in order to provide a differential diagnosis
Objective 3: Work out a suitable management plan for women with breast infections/pain

Australia Lisa Amir, MBBS, MMed, PhD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

For over 20 years, Dr Lisa Amir has been seeing breastfeeding women with nipple and breast pain and infections. As a medical student she was taught that most clinical diagnoses are made by taking a careful history. Allowing the patient to tell their own story, while asking pertinent questions, usually reveals the likely cause of the problem. Careful physical examination, and occasional use of investigations, confirm the diagnosis. Using case studies from her breastfeeding medicine practice, Lisa demonstrates how to ask the right questions to correctly diagnose and treat nipple and breast problems. She will present case studies including mastitis, recurrent mastitis, breast abscess, and nipple and breast candida infection, and also discuss rare and unusual causes of nipple and breast pain and infection.

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Durations: 52 mins
Milk sharing: Comparative risks and biomedical ethics

Dr Karleen Gribble is an Adjunct Fellow in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Western Sydney. Her research interests include adoptive breastfeeding, long-term breastfeeding, non-nutritional aspects of breastfeeding, child protection and breastfeeding, peer-to-peer milk sharing and models of care for traumatised children. Karleen speaks and publishes widely on these subjects to lay and professional audiences. Karleen is active in advocacy and teaching in the areas of infant feeding in emergencies and the marketing of infant formula. She is also an Australian Breastfeeding Association Community Educator and Breastfeeding Counsellor.

Objective 1: Understand the type of risks associated with peer-to-peer milk sharing and how to mitigate these risks
Objective 2: Understand the type of risks associated with formula feeding and how to mitigate these risks
Objective 3: Apply the principles of biomedical ethics to peer-to-peer milk sharing

Abstract:

The advent of Internet forums that facilitate peer-to-peer human milk sharing has resulted in health authorities stating that sharing human milk is dangerous. There are risks associated with all forms of infant feeding, including breastfeeding and the use of manufactured infant formulas. Part one of this presentation will compare the risks of milk sharing with the risks of using infant formula and include suggestions for risk mitigation. The facilitation of peer-to-peer milk sharing via the Internet has proven challenging to many health professionals and organizations. Biomedical ethics can be used to explore medical dilemmas and find reasoned, consistent, and defensible solutions to moral problems. The principles of biomedical ethics--autonomy, veracity, beneficence, nonmaleficence, confidentiality, and justice--are applied to peer-to-peer milk sharing in the second part of this presentation. Application of these principles provides guidance to assist health workers to act ethically in their interactions with mothers and others around the peer sharing of milk

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Durations: 52 mins
Robyn Roche-Paull, RN, BSN, IBCLC, LLLL
Babies, Breasts and Body Mods: Where Body Art and Breastfeeding Collide
U.S.A. Robyn Roche-Paull, RN, BSN, IBCLC, LLLL

Robyn Roche-Paull, RN, BSN, IBCLC, has been working with breastfeeding mothers for over 14 years. She holds Bachelor's degrees in Maternal Child Health and Nursing. Currently, Robyn is a L&D and Postpartum RN at Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center, and also works with AD military mothers as an IBCLC. In addition, Robyn is a Board member of MiLCA (Military Lactation Consultants Association), and the Secretary for TALCA (Tidewater Area Lactation Consultant Association).

Robyn is an energetic and dynamic speaker who brings personal experience combined with evidence-based research to her presentations. Her motivation for speaking is to bring attention to subjects she feels are little understood, and yet affect many women. As a tattooed and pierced IBCLC, Robyn has a personal as well as professional interest in Body Modifications. With the rise in tattooing and piercings by the new generation of breastfeeding mothers, Robyn feels that the topic of Body Modifications and how it relates to breastfeeding, is very relevant.

Robyn lives in Virginia Beach with her husband and 3 school-age children.

Objective 1: Learner will understand the culture, history, types, and reasons for body modifications
Objective 2: Learner will identify how piercings and tattoos are performed
Objective 3: Learner will define the health issues surrounding piercings and tattoos as related to breastfeeding
Objective 4:Learner will define laser removal and universal precautions as related to breastfeeding

U.S.A. Robyn Roche-Paull, RN, BSN, IBCLC, LLLL
Abstract:

In recent years there has been a large increase in the numbers of women obtaining various types of body modifications (such as piercings, tattoos) before, during and after childbearing. Very little has been written to guide health care practitioners in how to counsel new mothers on how various body modifications may impact breastfeeding and vice versa. This presentation will describe the incidence of and motivation for body modifications, how various body mods are performed, and highlight clinical breastfeeding issues that often arise in relation to body mods. A short discourse on the clash of cultures between body modifications and breastfeeding will also be explored.

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Durations: 74 mins
Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC
Nipple Nuances: From Pain to Peppermint and What the Textbooks Don't Cover
USA Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC

Marsha is a registered nurse and international board certified lactation consultant. She has been assisting breastfeeding families in hospital, clinic, and home settings since 1976. Marsha is the executive director of the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy: Research, Education, and Legal Branch (NABA REAL). As such, she advocates for breastfeeding at the state and federal levels. She served as a vice president of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) from 1990-1994 and in 1999 as president of ILCA. She is the chair of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition, a board member of the US Lactation Consultant Association, and Baby Friendly USA, USLCA’s representative to the USDA’s Breastfeeding Promotion Consortium, and NABA REAL’s representative to the US Breastfeeding Committee. Marsha is an international speaker, and an author of numerous publications including ones on the hazards of infant formula use, Code issues in the US, and Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence.

Objective 1: Describe the anatomy and physiology of the nipple/areola complex
Objective 2: Describe the physiology of the nipple during sucking
Objective 3: Participants will be able to discuss nipple problems and their resolution

USA Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Sore nipples are the bane of breastfeeding mothers. Nipple pain and/or damage is one of the top reasons for the early abandonment of breastfeeding. There are a large number of suggested remedies, many of which have little or no high quality evidence to recommend their use. This presentation will explore the structure of the nipple, potential screening tools for sore nipples, contributors to sore nipples, antenatal interventions, flat and inverted nipples, colonization and infection of the nipples, biofilms, small colony variants of Staphylococci aureus, and a plethora of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatments to relieve pain and hasten healing.

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Durations: 52 mins
Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC
Social Media Backlash – Addressing Emotionally Charged Responses
Australia Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC

In between breastfeeding her youngest boy, chasing after her oldest two boys, blogging and occasionally sleeping; Meg works with women to help them reach their breastfeeding goals. Meg has a degree in Psychology and was a La Leche League Leader (breastfeeding counsellor) for seven years before becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She writes frequently on her website about all things breastfeeding, is a guest blogger and has published articles in “Nurture Parenting Magazine” and “Natural Mother Magazine”. Needless to say she passionate about helping women reach their breastfeeding goals and loves helping to get the word out about how women can do this! She places a huge emphasis on sharing evidenced based research without the sugary coating.

Objective 1: Identify the most common topics within social media which create the largest negative response from individuals.
Objective 2: Share information and/or experiences in a way to decrease the chance of receiving negative and/or aggressive comments.
Objective 3: Become aware of how our own ego and beliefs can affect how we share information and reply to negative or positive comments.

Australia Meg Nagle, BA Psychology, IBCLC
Abstract:

Now more than ever, people from all parts of the world are engaging in social media. Many IBCLC’s, midwives, nurses and doctors have social media accounts and use these to connect with breastfeeding mums. Along with the positives come some very real challenges. There are many circumstances where information has been shared and a huge backlash will occur from emotionally charged and aggressive mums who feel as though they are being judged and criticized for using artificial breastmilk. This presents a challenge to the health care provider as it can be time consuming to respond, exhausting keeping up with it all and can make some hesitant to share their thoughts and opinions. This presentation will cover examples of questions asked and mum’s responses, how to best handle and reply to negative comments and ways in which we can use social media in a positive and helpful light for breastfeeding mums.

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Durations: 30 mins
Helene M. Johns, Midwife, IBCLC, PhD Candidate
The MILC Study – Exploring the prevalence and outcomes associated with breast milk expressing: a prospective cohort study
Australia Helene M. Johns, Midwife, IBCLC, PhD Candidate

Helene Johns has a clinical midwifery background and a keen interest in women's experience of birth and early parenting. She is a volunteer counsellor with the Australian Breastfeeding Association. Working as a Maternal and Child Health Nurse in Melbourne and as a Midwife in Well Women’s Services at the Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, she is involved in the provision of advocacy, advice, support and referral in both roles, in the latter through the state-wide Women’s Health Information Centre. Helene’s clinical roles involve the provision of Pap tests and sexual health screening for well women and De-Infibulation for women who have experienced female circumcision. Helene has a particular interest in breastfeeding influences and outcomes which has led to her involvement in the Mothers and Infants Lactation Cohort (MILC) study. She is a PhD candidate at The Judith Lumley Centre (formerly Mother and Child Health Research), La Trobe University.

Objective 1: Be familiar with current practices of expressing and use of breast pumps
Objective 2: Recognise the relationship between feeding method in hospital and duration of breastfeeding.
Objective 3: Be able to list the common determinants of breastfeeding in Australia.

Australia Helene M. Johns, Midwife, IBCLC, PhD Candidate
Abstract:

During the MILC study we recruited 1003 postpartum mothers of term healthy infants who intended to breastfeed to explore the prevalence and outcomes of breast milk expression, and whether feeding other than directly from the breast prior to hospital discharge decreased the proportion of these infants receiving any breast milk at six months. Data were collected between June 2009 and November 2011, at recruitment 24-48 hours after birth and by telephone interview at three and six months postpartum. At recruitment, 48% of infants had been fully breastfeeding at the breast, 47% had received at least some expressed breast milk. Only 36% of primiparas had been fully feeding at the breast. At six months, infants who had fed only at the breast at recruitment were more likely fed breast milk (76% vs. 59%; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.27, 2.46; adjusted for parity, type of birth, breastfeeding intention, perceived breastfeeding problems at recruitment and education).

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Durations: 50 mins
Laurie B. Jones, MD, FAAP, IBCLC
Dr. MILK Physician Mother Peer Support Network
U.S.A. Laurie B. Jones, MD, FAAP, IBCLC

I am a board-certified general pediatrician and board certified lactation consultant. I have practiced general pediatrics and newborn medicine for 12 years. I have practiced breastfeeding medicine for 4 years. I teach medical students and residents in my office practice and in the hospital setting for newborn nursery. I am the medical director for the newborn nursery at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, AZ which has about 4000 deliveries per year. I am the chair person for our hospital-wide breastfeeding committee and utilize the American Academy of Pediatrics Residency Curriculum for breastfeeding. I founded and coordinate the Dr. MILK support program for physician mothers that are breastfeeding.

Objective 1:Identify two shared attributes of physician mothers as a high-risk breastfeeding group
Objective 2:Name two unique attributes of physician mothers as a high-risk breastfeeding group
Objective 3:List three features of a locally successful Dr. MILK peer counseling network

U.S.A. Laurie B. Jones, MD, FAAP, IBCLC
Abstract:

Dr. MILK ® (Mothers Interested in Lactation Knowledge) is an online and in-person support network to help physician mothers achieve their personal breastfeeding goals. Physician mothers have been defined as a high-risk breastfeeding group because of their unique barriers to achieving breastfeeding goals in addition to the common barriers shared with all work-outside-the-home mothers. When a physician mother reaches her breastfeeding goals, she is more likely to hold positive knowledge and attitudes towards breastfeeding in her medical practice. Until there is universal physician education in breastfeeding competencies, achieving personal breastfeeding success in physician mothers remains a critical strategy to impact thousands of mother-baby dyads that she will encounter over the course of her career.

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Durations: 38 mins
Jaye Simpson, CLE, IBCLC, RLC
LGBTQ Parents and Lactation – An Exploration in LGBTQ Culture
U.S.A. Jaye Simpson, CLE, IBCLC, RLC

Jaye started her career in lactation in 1995 becoming a Certified Lactation Educator (CLE) through Lactation Institute and then became an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2000. In 2005 Jaye completed her training in infant massage and is a Certified Instructor of Infant Massage tailoring her classes for parents whose babies had special needs and structural issues due to birth trauma. In 2010 Jaye completed training to become a Bowen Therapist. Specializing in working with babies with structural issues, Jaye’s studies and research led her to develop the Structure and Function training program in 2013 teaching professionals in the birth and breastfeeding fields how to evaluate infant structure and function as it relates to breastfeeding. Jaye also specializes in LGBTQ issues as they relate to lactation, parenting and cultural acceptance. As part of the LGBTQ community herself, she has personal and professional experience with LGBTQ Issues which lends her a unique perspective and insight to the LGBTQ world.

Objective 1:List 3 aspects that affect LGBTQ Culture as it relates to lactation
Objective 2:List 2 ways to support LGBTQ parents regarding lactation
Objective 3:List 3 ways LGBTQ parents deal with lactation

U.S.A. Jaye Simpson, CLE, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

This presentation will help practitioners learn about the culture of same-sex couples as it relates to lactation. Just as we know we need to be aware of other cultures within our communities and lactation customs in order to serve them better and be sensitive to their nuances, we need to recognize that the LGBT community has its own culture as well. Understanding that culture will help us be more attentive and supportive of our same-sex couples. Same –sex couples face any number of challenges in society in general and can find it difficult to find supportive and accepting lactation care. Knowing the nature of your own community and the acceptance level of the LGBTQ population can help you be more effective, accessible and supportive as a care-provider.

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Durations: 35 mins

Christine Van Den Broecke-Schneider was born in Salzburg, Austria. She worked there mainly in the graphics and printing industry. During her first pregnancy she moved to Mechelen, Belgium where she still lives with her husband and her two children. Soon she came in contact with La Leche League in Brussels and in 1997 she became the first Dutch speaking La Leche League leader in Belgium-Flanders. Since 2001 she has been a member of the Belgium Federal Breastfeeding Committee. She is active in different national and local breastfeeding projects and the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. She frequently writes articles for La Leche League publications and other publications. She also gives presentations about breastfeeding through various organizations, for midwives and other maternity care workers, and she is still an active La Leche League leader.

Objective 1:Present overview of the complicated structure and introduce the hallenges of having multiple languages in Belgium
Objective 2:Briefly present the Belgium culture in general
Objective 3:Give facts about breastfeeding and the breastfeeding culture in Belgium.
Objective 4: Explain the specific challenges we are facing in Belgium over the next few years

Abstract:

Breastfeeding rates in Belgium are among the lowest in Europe. Mothers usually return to work fulltime when the baby is only 3 month old. Family, daycare and society very often are not supportive to breastfeeding mothers. Over the last decade things are changing for the better. The rate for initiation of breastfeeding does not increase, but mothers nurse their babies much longer than they used to do 10 or 15 years ago. Nevertheless, the complex and changing structure of the federal Belgium state and the three different official languages of the country (Dutch, French and German) create additional challenges. For example, it is impossible to get national breastfeeding rates. The efforts of the Federal Breastfeeding Committee are usually bogged down in the jungle of regulations and laws of this little but very complex country.

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Durations: 30 mins
Vicki Tapia, BS, IBCLC, RLC
Medical Relief Mission to the Dominican Republic “We Don’t Need a Lactation Consultant…Or Do We?"
U.S.A. Vicki Tapia, BS, IBCLC, RLC

Vicki Tapia, BS, IBCLC, RLC, is a lactation consultant with over 30 years experience working with breastfeeding mothers and babies on a daily basis, in both hospital and clinical settings. She has also had numerous articles published in peer-reviewed journals and spoken at breastfeeding conferences nationally and internationally. Serving as an LC on a medical mission had long been a goal of hers, so when an opportunity arose to join a medical brigade to the Dominican Republic in November of 2012, she didn’t hesitate to be part of the team.

Objective 1:Recognize the common barriers to breastfeeding in this developing country
Objective 2:Explain why breastfeeding education is so important and necessary in this developing country
Objective 3:Grasp the importance of dialogue within the medical community

U.S.A. Vicki Tapia, BS, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

The author shares her experiences and observations as part of a medical relief brigade serving in five different bateys (villages) near Monte Cristi in the Dominican Republic in November 2012. She reports many of the common barriers to breastfeeding, along with her reflections on affecting change in this developing island country. She describes her efforts to promote exclusive breastfeeding, focusing on education.

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Durations: 24 mins
Best Beginnings, UK - [no credits awarded for this presentation]
I have been involved in Neonatal care for 25 years and I am a nurse by background with 15 years in senior management the last 7 years I held the position of Clinical Service Manager of Neonatal Services at Cambridge University Hospitals until my retirement last year from the NHS. I was also the Chair of the NNA up until last September when I stepped down after serving two terms in that position. I am delighted to be joining Best Beginnings as the National Facilitator for the Small Wonders Campaign and I am looking forward to working with colleagues who share my commitment to reducing the inequalities that exist within the Child Health arena
Abstract:

Best Beginnings is a charity that was founded in 2006 by our CEO Alison Baum and achieved charitable status in 2007. Best Beginnings Vision and Mission are to be a catalyst for changes by the development of innovative resources for parents and professionals to help reduce the inequalities in child health across the UK from pre conception through to a child’s 3rd Birthday. The way we function is by reaching out to Health Care Professional and families through a media approach and this includes using Facebook, Twitter as well as the more traditional email and WebPages and the use of film telling the “story” from a parents perspective..

There are a number of major projects that have been initiated and are ongoing as well new projects that are in the process of being launched:

  • • From Bump to Breastfeeding 2008
  • • Small Wonders DVD 2012
  • • Baby Express 2014


New projects
  • • Maternal Mental Health Project
  • • Bump Buddy App aimed at the under 25’s and available free of charge on iPhone or Smartphone ( due to be launched in November 2014)

The presentation is an overview of all of the work that is being continued and undertaken by the team at Best Beginnings with background data to support the work that we are performing here in the UK.

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Additional Details

Viewing Time: 6 Weeks

Tags / Categories

Breastfeeding and Lactation

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