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IBCLC Detailed Content Outline: Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology Focused CERPs - Section V

Access CERPs on Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology for the IBCLC Detailed Content Outline recertification requirements. Enjoy convenient on-demand viewing of the latest Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology focused IBCLC CERPs at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Kimberly is a Sexological Bodyworker, Somatic Experiencing trauma resolution practitioner, postpartum advocate, and single mom. She specializes in helping women heal from birth injuries, gynecological procedures and sexual boundary ruptures. She is the author of the early mothering classic The Fourth Trimester and Call of the Wild: How We Heal Trauma, Awaken Our Own Power and Use It for Good- a feminist nervous system treatise.

Abstract:

Somatic Experiencing is a body-oriented therapeutic model that supports the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Reframe your approach to the fourth trimester by learning how to work with your client’s physiology to promote healing. Learn more about the four domains of health that influence the postpartum experience, the five cross-cultural universal postpartum needs and the five channels of inner and outer experience, as a tool to help clients get out of looping cycles of shame and blame.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 8  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Pound is a Clinical Investigator at the CHEO Research Institute, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa, and the Resident Research Coordinator for the Pediatric Residency Program at the University of Ottawa. She is a specialist in the field of Consulting Pediatrics and has presented at national meetings, and published in the area of breastfeeding, and has authored a position statement on breastfeeding for the Canadian Pediatric Society.

Abstract:

Canadian physicians are ill-equipped to support breastfeeding mothers as their confidence, attitudes and knowledge are known to be suboptimal. We developed, delivered, and evaluated a combination of continuing professional development (CPD) activities targeting specific gaps uncovered in our previous Canadian physicians’ breastfeeding assessment, with the ultimate goal of encouraging participants to integrate new skills and knowledge in their practice. Methods We developed and delivered an interactive workshop to facilitate physicians’ ability to support patients’ breastfeeding practices. We distributed communication tools to improve information retention. We performed phone outreach 4 to 8 weeks post workshop to reinforce take-home messages, gather information on implementation of breastfeeding support practices taught at the workshop, and to gather information on physicians’ current perceptions and practices. Participation, satisfaction with the CPD activities and learning were tracked through questionnaires and follow-up phone outreach. We aimed to recruit 30 to 40 physicians but recruited 7. Results Workshop participation increased participants’ confidence in breastfeeding counseling skills, improved their knowledge, and was associated with a desire to change clinical practice. The workshop was rated as relevant, interesting, effective, and helpful. Conclusion Physician recruitment was much more difficult than anticipated, and a large selection bias was inevitable as only physicians with a keen interest in learning about breastfeeding participated in the study. However, our participants rated the intervention very positively. Given the difficulty in recruitment, a more feasible approach needs to be adapted and evaluated. In future, we will target the intervention at residency level.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Jodine Chase is a public relations and communications consultant specializing in issues and crisis management news analysis. Jodine is a long-time breastfeeding advocate who, as a volunteer, works for many breastfeeding related causes including advocating for the re-establishment of milk banks, amending policies and legislation to protect breastfeeding rights, and appropriate infant and young child feeding during emergencies including the Syrian refugee crisis. Jodine serves on the board of her local breastfeeding advocacy group, the Breastfeeding Action Committee of Edmonton (BACE), which is implementing a human rights education grant project to increase the number of Breastfeeding Friendly public spaces in her city. She also volunteers with the Best for Babes Foundation, ILCA, INFACT Canada, and Friends of the WHO Code. She’s involved in many breastfeeding related events including BfB’s Miracle Milk Stroll and Quintessence’s Breastfeeding Challenge.

Abstract:

Despite advances in human rights legislation in Canada and the US, women still face harassment and discrimination when they breastfeed in public. In the last 15 years in Alberta, Canada, reports of discrimination escalated even as policies were adopted to affirm and support the right of women and children to breastfeed in public. In 2014 the Breastfeeding Action Committee of Edmonton (BACE) received a grant from the Alberta Human Rights Education and Multiculturalism Fund to further development of a tool kit for Breastfeeding Friendly spaces. The project included policy, procedure and training development for stakeholders and a public education campaign. Public attitudes towards breastfeeding in public, including in specific spaces where discrimination had occurred - swimming pools, the public library - were measured prior to the implementation of a Breastfeeding Friendly program that included policy articulation, staff training, and public education. Public attitudes were measured after program implementation. This presentation will explore the impact of the implementation of Edmonton's Breastfeeding Friendly project on the potential for families to feel safe and welcome to breastfeed in Edmonton's public spaces.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE

Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Registered Lactation Consultant. She is the owner of Sound Beginnings, which provides in-home consultations and education on lactation, babywearing, and more. Her background as a birth and postpartum doula, and childbirth, newborn, and parenting educator, inform her compassionate and evidence-based support of new families in the greater Seattle area. Joy holds a Master of Arts in Cultural Studies, graduate certificate in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, and two Bachelors degrees from the University of Washington. She serves as adjunct faculty at the Simkin Center for Allied Birth Vocations at Bastyr University where she created the Breastfeeding for Doulas course. Joy is passionate about her family, social justice, and continuing education.

USA Joy MacTavish, MA, IBCLC, RLC, ICCE
Abstract:

Dental caries are the most common chronic infectious disease of early childhood and new recommendations urge families to seek pediatric dental care at a younger age. For families who are practicing full-term breastfeeding and/or nocturnal breastfeeding (night-nursing), many are also reporting increased pressure to night-wean, wean completely, or otherwise incorporate care that is often not practical or evidence-based. A clear understanding of the research and realities of breastfeeding and the risks of dental caries, along with advocacy skills, are integral for breastfeeding families feeling confident in their breastfeeding relationship and their dental care. This presentation will compare the latest research and recommendations from the dental and lactation fields, as well as outline support strategies for assisting lactation clients as they understand the relevant information, communicate with their dental professionals, and make informed decisions about their breastfeeding relationships.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Ratih Ayu Wulandari, MD, IBCLC is a breastfeeding mother of two. She applied baby led weaning method for her two babies while continue breastfeeding and get many benefits from the method. As lactation consultant she gives breastfeeding counseling and complimentary feeding either with spoon feeding or baby led weaning approach for family who wish to know more and practice it.  Experienced breastfeeding her two tongue-tied babies, helped her understand the pain and support early frenotomy. She is now practicing frenotomy for tongue-tie and lip-tie. She believes attachment parenting is the best way to nurture a child and shares her thoughts on her blog http://www.menjadiibu.com.

Abstract:

Complementary feeding is a process starting when breast milk alone is no longer sufficient to meet the nutritional requirements of infants and therefore other foods and liquids are needed along with breast milk typically covers the period from 6 - 24 months of age. Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) is an alternative method for introducing complementary foods to infants in which the infant feeds themselves hand-held foods instead of being spoon-fed by an adult. The BLW infant also shares family food and mealtimes and is offered milk (ideally breast milk) on demand until they self-wean. In Indonesia, this method of feeding has becoming popular lately and be a controversy in Indonesian traditional spoon feeding culture. This presentation will present 10 cases of BLW in Indonesia with different settings. It shows baby who was breastfed, have a well educated and stayed at home mother will be more successful in this method of feeding.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Elly Taylor, DIP, Arts

With over 25 years’ experience as a relationship counsellor, parents’ group facilitator, mental health educator, partner and mum, Elly Taylor has become an internationally known parenthood preparation and perinatal relationship expert and the award-winning author of Becoming Us. Elly’s passion is preparing parents for a happy and healthy family—at any stage in their parenthood journey, and especially in a challenging world. Her Becoming Us approach includes fathers and partners in all aspects of pregnancy, birth and beyond, harnesses the attachment bond between couples to stabilise them through the life changes and challenges of parenthood and links both parents into community services to support the mental, emotional and relational wellbeing of the whole family.

Elly has served as an advisor for numerous university research projects and her ground-breaking Becoming Us developmental framework has now become a comprehensive multi-disciplinary education and professional training and courses for parents. In a full circle moment, Elly recently trained midwives, allied health and therapy professionals in her local community and now Becoming Us Nest Building Sessions are preparing expectant parents in the hospitals where her children were born. Elly lives in Sydney, Australia with her firefighter husband, their three kidults and an abundance of pets.

Australia Elly Taylor, DIP, Arts
Abstract:

The “transition” into parenthood is culturally a time of great joy, excitement and celebration. But our “Bon Voyage” attitude to parenthood appears to be setting families up to fail. Research tells us new parents are struggling: currently 1 in 3 mothers and 1 in 5 fathers suffer from anxiety or depression during the perinatal period. Added to this, a whopping 92% of couples report increased conflict and 67% a decline in relationship satisfaction in the first few years of family. So, what’s going on here? Is there a better way? And what can perinatal professionals do about it?

In this presentation, we’ll first bust some unhelpful myths of parenthood. Next, participants will learn that while parents may expect having a baby is the destination, it’s just the beginning. Parenthood is like travelling deeper and deeper into foreign territory: every new stage has it’s own surprises, joys, challenges and unexpected rewards. And the journey never ends.

We’ll explore ways to prepare parents for the stages of early parenthood (even long after their baby has joined them) in ways that support the mental, emotional and relationship wellbeing of mothers, fathers and parents, so their whole family can thrive.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 8  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
webinar

Beyond Baby Friendly, Thinking Outside the Box

By Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jane Morton has had a long, fulfilling career as a general pediatrician, She has also had a long-standing interest in breastfeeding, from understanding its clinical benefits to practical solutions for mothers having difficulty in providing breastmilk to their infants.  Over the years, she has conducted research on human milk and breastfeeding and has designed and implemented systems and policies to help breastfeeding mothers.  She produced award winning videos on this topic, including “Breastfeeding: A Guide to Getting Started”, “A Preemie Needs His Mother: Breastfeeding a Premature Baby” and “Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding”.  These have been translated and widely used in thousands of hospitals to train both staff and new mothers. As an executive board member of both the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding, she enjoyed working to enlarge the footprint of breastfeeding, both nationally and internationally.

For a 5 year period, she joined the neonatology clinical faculty at Stanford to develop the Breastfeeding Medicine Program.  In that position, she had the opportunity to design a nationally recognized educational program, conduct and publish original research on milk production and composition in mothers of very low birth weight infants, and publish a study with the AAP on the efficacy of a breastfeeding curriculum for physician residents in training. She was an advisor to the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, and was a key author of the toolkit “Nutritional Support for the Very Low Birth Weight Infant”. She co-authored the book Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU.  She has published extensively and presented her original research and educational workshops internationally. She continues to teach at Stanford where she is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Emerita.

USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Abstract:

Complications of insufficient milk production and suboptimal intake account for delayed discharge, readmission, potentially serious medical complications and a sharp drop off in any breastfeeding before 1 month. Reframing lactation support based on prevention, accessibility and sustainability, we could logically reduce these complications, while increasing exclusive breastfeeding rates for both low and at-risk infants. Recent science supports the importance of beginning this support for all mothers in the first post delivery hour, to prevent what might be called, “the lost first hour syndrome”.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.