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Supplementation & Artificial Breast Milk Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Supplementation & Artificial Breast Milk for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Supplementation & Artificial Breast Milk online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Supplementation & Artificial Breast Milk education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Switzerland Johanna Sargeant, BEd, BA, IBCLC

Johanna Sargeant is an IBCLC based in Zurich, Switzerland. She is passionate about utilising her varied background in biological science, occupational therapy, education, communication and language to empower parents with empathetic support and evidence-based information through her private practice, Milk and Motherhood. Originally from Australia, Johanna has been living in Switzerland for over a decade, providing support to many thousands of families throughout the country and internationally. She has spoken as a panelist for the WHO’s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative congress in Geneva, has presented for the Gold Lactation Conference, iLactation Breastfeeding Conference and the International Breastfeeding and Feminism Conference in the US, as well as been both a presenter and an onsite breastfeeding advisor for workplaces such as Google. She has additionally worked with universities, hospitals, other medical practices and workplaces, teaching seminars, running workshops and creating valuable content that allows for better overall support for breastfeeding and new families. Her personal feeding experiences after having her two boys in Switzerland have led her to the establishment of the sole peer-to-peer milk-sharing network in Switzerland, and fuels her passion for providing knowledgeable, guilt-free infant feeding support globally.

Switzerland Johanna Sargeant, BEd, BA, IBCLC
Abstract:

Using an at-breast supplementer is often thought to be annoying, complicated and unsustainable -- but it doesn't have to be! While many lactation consultants are aware of the benefits of supplementing directly at the breast, many admit to feeling overwhelmed, and few actually use it with their clients. With this presentation, you will learn the specific benefits and barriers to this form of supplementation, view demonstrations of a variety of these devices, and learn some tips and tricks to make this at-breast supplementation feasible and sustainable for families. We all need to feel comfortable recommending and teaching the use of these tools, enabling us to foster the best overall health for the families we support.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Miranda Buck, RN, MPhil, IBCLC

Miranda Buck, (RN(Paeds), BA(Hons), MPhil, IBCLC), has been a paediatric nurse since 1995 and has a background in neonatal and paediatric intensive care nursing. She is currently a PhD candidate at the Judith Lumley Centre and a lactation consultant at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. She also enjoys teaching into the undergraduate and postgraduate nursing programs as a visiting lecturer. Miranda is noted for her enthusiasm for evidence based care and an approach which draws on anthropological and developmental theories. Her particular research interests are breastfeeding difficulties, online peer support and breastfeeding in the neonatal intensive care unit. She lives in Melbourne with her daughters, Esme, seven and Sylvie, four.

Australia Miranda Buck, RN, MPhil, IBCLC
Abstract:As many as half of well term infants leave hospital not fully breastfeeding. How these infants are supplemented matters, just as much as what they are supplemented with. In this presentation I will explain why it matters and review a range of techniques for feeding infants not at the breast including:
• cup feeding
• finger feeding
• supply lines
Using the evidence for the risks and benefits of different approaches I will describe how to assess which system is most appropriate. Hospital policies and guidelines that support the use of alternative methods of supplementary feeding are an important tool to help midwives and nurses keep infants breastfeeding. In this presentation I will describe how one hospital has created a series of policies, guidelines and parental information leaflets to reduce the use of bottles and the barriers we faced in implementing them.
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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.