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Slow Weight Gain Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Slow Weight Gain for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Slow Weight Gain online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Slow Weight Gain education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Trained as an educational Scientist I first became a volunteer for VBN (a Dutch organisation similar to LLL). In 2000 I became an IBCLC and have worked as such in private practice ever since. I work and live in the Amsterdam area in the Netherlands. In my practice I see a wide variety of mothers and babies from different cultural backgrounds (although mainly in relatively good economic circumstances) and age, from ex-preemies at home to 3-4 year olds. Apart from face-to-face breastfeeding help I also teach. This ranges from antenatal breastfeeding workshops for parents to in company trainings for professional organisations. I find joy in assisting parents and babies to find ways to work together. And in showing healthcare professionals that providing good breastfeeding care is an interesting and rewarding aspect of their profession.

Abstract:

An important reason for early weaning is (perceived) insufficient growth and milk production. This worries both parents and healthcare professionals. Therefore monitoring growth is an important aspect of the care around newborn babies and young children. Although weightloss in the first days of live is normal in humans, the consequence is often supplementary feeding. In this presentation I will discuss how tools to closely monitor weightloss ánd -gain can help prevent unnescesary supplementation. And how such a tool, if and when used properly, can also help in education of both healthcare professionals as expecting parent. In this presentation the focus will be on a tool developed by TNO Nederland precisely with the aim to prevent unnescessary supplementation and cessation of breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Micaela Notarangelo, PhD, IBCLC, RLC, obtained her IBCLC certification in 2010. She has a private lactation consultant practice in Lerici, Italy and takes a particular interest in everything that concerns breastfeeding science and medicine. From 1992 to 2001, Micaela lived in Japan, where in 1998 she earned a PhD in Economics at Hokkaido University, Sapporo. She also worked as assistant professor at Hokkaido University and Utrecht University. After returning to Italy, she became a La Leche League Leader in 2005 and was the Area Professional Liaison of LLL Italy from 2010 to 2013. In 2017, together with Chiara Toti, IBCLC, Micaela has developed a new two-day course for health care providers about breastfeeding support for babies with lip and/or palate cleft. The course has been held, with the financial support of Aismel, a parents' association, in several major Italian hospitals.

Abstract:

There is increasing concern for the risk of hypernatremic dehydration (HD) in infants breastfeeding poorly, and weight loss (WL) is often considered a key variable in deciding whether to supplement a newborn. However, WL is the net sum of different forces, and it might be difficult to determine which actions will be the most effective in protecting both the baby and breastfeeding. This presentation will review the newest scientific evidence about WL, and by a comparison of the results of previous quantitative studies will provide a more comprehensive framework to interpret weight changes and feeding behaviors that can be suggestive of an increased risk of HD, in order to facilitate the detection of infants who can benefit from additional breastfeeding support and those who might eventually require supplementation. The data confirm that both birth and breastfeeding perinatal practices have influence on WL and the risk of HD, and are therefore important modifiable factors to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 2  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Diane DiTomasso, IBCLC, PhD, RN

Dr. Diane DiTomasso achieved a Diploma in Nursing from Newport Hospital School of Nursing; a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, a Master of Science in Nursing Education, and a PhD from the University of Rhode Island. She is an Associate Professor at the University of Rhode Island College of Nursing.

Her research focus is human lactation and infant weight. She has multiple publications in journals such as Journal of Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing (JOGNN), Journal of Human Lactation, Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, and Nursing for Women’s Health and has presented her work nationally and internationally.

Dr. DiTomasso has received various honors and awards with the most recent being the 2020 Suzanne Feetham Nurse Scientist Family Research Award by the Eastern Nursing Research Society (ENRS) and the 2020 Best of JOGNN Award as first author of the article, “Systematic Review of Expected Weight Changes After Birth for Full-Term, Breastfed Newborn. She has served as Principal Investigator for a variety of neonatal research studies. Dr. DiTomasso is a member of AWHONN, the International Lactation Consultant Association, the Eastern Nursing Research Society, and Sigma Theta Tau International. She currently serves as a Member on the AWHONN Research Advisory Panel.

U.S.A. Diane DiTomasso, IBCLC, PhD, RN
Abstract:

This presentation will summarize the findings of recent studies on neonatal weight changes that occur in the early weeks of life among full-term, breastfed newborns.

Data Sources: Using the keywords breastfeeding, newborn, infant, weight, weight loss, and growth, we searched PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, and MEDLINE for primary studies and secondary analyses. We also reviewed the reference lists of retrieved articles. Study Selection: Quantitative studies published in the English language from 2015 through 2019 that focused on newborn weight changes. From a total of 827 records initially screened, we included 11 studies in this analysis.

Data Extraction: Two authors independently reviewed the selected articles with the use of the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Synthesis and Recommendations Tool. To determine evidence levels and quality ratings, we evaluated the consistency and generalizability of study results, sample sizes, study designs, adequacy of controls, and definitive nature of the conclusions. This presentation will discuss the finding of this study related to expected weight changes after birth for full-term, breastfed newborns.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Pamela Morrison has worked with breastfeeding mothers and babies for 30 years. She served as a La Leche League Leader in Harare, Zimbabwe from 1987 before certifying as the first IBCLC in the country in 1990. She worked in private practice until 2003, before moving to Australia and then to England. She served for many years on the Zimbabwean National Breastfeeding Committee and on the BFHI Task Force. She has subsequently served as Co-coordinator of the WABA Task Forces on Infants Nutrition Rights and on Breastfeeding and HIV. Pamela continues to write and speak for the preservation and protection of breastfeeding in challenging situations.

Abstract:

In biological terms, successful breastfeeding demands that the baby survives and thrives on his mother’s milk. “Not-enough-milk” (either real or perceived) has long been recognized as the most common reason why mothers abandon breastfeeding. Ways to identify for the mother whether a baby is “getting enough” are discussed. The causes of inadequate breastmilk intake include physiological/anatomical conditions in mother/baby, poor lactation management or other more obscure causes. While planning interventions to enhance breastmilk production and improve infant intake, it is important to protect the baby’s nutritional status. Simultaneously implementing strategies to increase the mothers’ breastmilk supply while caring for a high-need baby can be immensely challenging. Each client will need constant support, reassurance and re-evaluation. Turning such a difficulty around, with the goal of eventually returning to exclusive breastfeeding, can be one of the most fulfilling and rewarding situations that an IBCLC can work with.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Christina Smillie, MD, FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr. Smillie is an American pediatrician who founded in 1996 the first private medical practice in the USA devoted to the specialty of breastfeeding medicine. Board certified by both the American Board of Pediatrics in 1983 and by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners in 1995, she values her continuing education from colleagues, research, and breastfeeding babies and their mothers. She’s been a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine since 1996, and an ABM Fellow since 2002. She serves as an advisor to the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding and on La Leche League International’s Health Advisory Council. Dr. Smillie speaks nationally and internationally about the clinical management of a wide variety of breastfeeding issues, always stressing the role of the motherbaby as a single psychoneurobiological system, and emphasizing the innate instincts underlying both maternal and infant competence.

USA Christina Smillie, MD, FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Breastfed infants who gain weight slowly can present a challenge to both parents and providers. Their quiet, content demeanor can delay diagnosis, and their anorectic behavior can make feeding very difficult. Moreover, as, Powers laments, our evidence base is clouded by confused definitions, contradictory growth standards, inadequate research, and no definitive standard of care. The medical literature has long suggested that, at minimum, infants should be back to birthweight by 2 weeks of age, and thereafter grow at least 20 gm/day, or 5 oz/week. However, data from the 2006 WHO Multicenter Growth Reference Study challenge these minimal standards. WHO data put infants of all percentiles back to birthweight before a week of age, and thereafter even female infants growing along the 1st percentile average 28 gm/day over weeks 2 to 8, while 1st percentile boys average 32 gm/day. At the 50th percentile, girls average 34 gm/day, boys 39 gm/day. Yet we do see exclusively breastfed babies who grow more slowly than the WHO standards. What’s going on? It was over 25 years ago that Dewey et al demonstrated in their classic DARLING studies that healthy infants who breastfeed on demand self-regulate their intake to steadily gain weight appropriately However, as many have observed, the sleepy underweight infant cues subtly and infrequently, thus defeating feeding strategies which rely on the baby’s presumptive good appetite to increase both infant weight and maternal milk production. We submit that once the infant’s appetite is impaired, the infant is NOT the healthy infant Dewey and WHO describe. Instead, apparent anorexia makes the infant incapable of the self-regulation that could break the vicious cycles of slow growth, low energy, and infrequent ineffective feeds.3 Importantly, ineffective milk removal also slows maternal breast milk production, further decreasing infant intake. In our breastfeeding medicine practice we’ve developed an approach to breaking these vicious cycles, using high-flow feeding methods to push infant intake towards rapid catch-up growth, while also offering strategies for increasing the rate of milk production. This requires significant maternal time, effort and energy, and can be hugely frustrating, so it is important to offer strategies that work with the mother’s real life, and permit her needed rest. Thus successful management also includes appropriate and intensive support to the mother, her energy, sleep, and emotional well-being. It’s our observation that, once caught up on weight, these infants become easy to feed, and do indeed achieve appropriate self-regulation to follow WHO growth standards.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.