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Family & Social Support Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Family & Social Support for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Family & Social Support online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Family & Social Support education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1.5 (details)
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Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant’s Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for “Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military”.

Abstract:

Fathers are an undervalued resource in breastfeeding, often ignored or treated with indifference. This presentation highlights the unique role of fathers as both the Co-Parent of the child and the mother’s primary care giver upon discharge from the hospital. We will discuss the literature regarding the impact that fathers have on breastfeeding and how they can be used more effectively to support breastfeeding. The presenter will also provide an insight into the male mind and how to effectively communicate with fathers. It also covers effective teaching strategies to bring fathers into the breastfeeding relationship. Newly updated for 2020.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Duncan Fisher promotes and develops support for parents to advance child health and development. In the last year he has been working with breastfeeding researchers across the world and with the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action to advance the idea of "breastfeeding as teamwork", following striking findings from research of the high gains from engaging with fathers and other family members. In UK he co-founded the Fatherhood Institute and for three years he served on the Board of the Government’s gender equality body, the Equal Opportunities Commission. He manages the website, FamilyIncluded.com, where all recent research on breastfeeding and fathers/families is reported. He initiated and currently manages a website for Cambridge and Princeton Universities reporting research on child welfare and development, ChildandFamilyBlog.com. He was awarded an OBE by the Queen in 2008 for his “services to children”. Duncan lives in Wales and divides his time between family work and work to support sustainable economic development in his home country.

Abstract:

Breastfeeding programmes that engage fathers are more effective than ones that only involve mothers and professionals. This accords with research that has shown that family is the main influence on breastfeeding. The way that families influence breastfeeding is diverse, depending on the make-up of the family, local culture and location (e.g. urban/rural). The influence of fathers is not necessarily intentional, but what fathers think and do influences the situation in almost every situation. In this presentation I will describe the principles of success that have been learned from programmes with published evaluations. These principles can be summed up in the phrase recently adopted by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, "breastfeeding is teamwork".

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Rue Khosa, ARNP, FNP-BC, IBCLC

Rue Khosa, AKA The Boob Boss, is the owner/founder of The Perfect Push, a lactation and parenting wellness clinic in downtown Redmond. She is a board certified family nurse practitioner, lactation consultant and a THRIVE parenting educator. Rue was born and raised Zimbabwe, where family plays a critical role in supporting expectant and new parents. This type of communal caring, called “kugarira”, helps families prepare for a new baby both emotionally and physically and guides them through the often challenging newborn period. Rue created The Perfect Push to bring that experience to Seattle. Rue began her women’s health career as a labor and delivery nurse over 10 years ago, at Washington Hospital Centre in DC. She received her graduate degree from Georgetown University, and her undergraduate degree from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Prior to opening her private practice, Rue was a Teaching Associate in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington’s School of Medicine and an Adjunct Clinical Faculty at Northwest University Buntain School of Nursing. In July 2019, Rue was commissioned by the Mayor to the City of Redmond’s Human Services Commission. In February 2020, Rue was invited to join Washington State Hospital Association's Safe Delivery Roadmap Commission. She sits on their Birth Equity task force working on program development. She also sits on the board of No More Under, a non profit organization committed to drowning prevention and awareness. Outside of redefining the childbirth and parenting experience, Rue is a mother of two young boys with a third on the way. She lives in Redmond, WA with her husband, mother and boys.

U.S.A. Rue Khosa, ARNP, FNP-BC, IBCLC
Abstract:

American culture values self-sufficiency and celebrates self-sacrifice in the name of success. The idea of community and communal living is fast becoming a thing of the past. Children graduate, go off to college, start careers and families seldom looking back. Moving back home or moving back to one’s old neighborhood is now unheard of. The result has been the rise of the nuclear family and the fall of the generational knowledge that supported breastfeeding and identified new moms at risk of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.

This talk will explore the importance of restoring and improving community and peer breastfeeding support and identifying barriers to success. Lactation providers will learn how to identify importance and the role extended family and how to include them without violating our patients privacy. Attendees will gain insight on health disparities and the historical significance of breastfeeding in communities of colors. Last but not least, the talk will highlight the importance of providing culturally sensitive and appropriate care.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Dr. Muswamba Mwamba, DrPH, MPH, IBCLC

Muswamba Mwamba is a father of five breastfed children. An International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant, a public health practitioner, and a scholar; his research interests focus on immigrant health within the minority group in the context of the US health disparity. Muswamba helps mothers and babies obtain the best health outcomes by teaching and inspiring their partner/ father to fight to remove barriers that prevent successful breastfeeding. As a professor at the University of North Texas at Dallas, Muswamba disseminates clinical and non-clinical information to inform graduate students of significant developments and trends in the field of infant feeding.

Muswamba is a lifelong learner. He trained in Belgium, where he earned a bachelor's degree in agricultural engineering, a master's degree in human nutrition biochemistry, and a second master's degree in food science and technology. Witnessing striking disparity in his maternal and child health practice, he deepened his understanding of public health's complexity in the US and elsewhere. He earned a master's degree in Public Health at the University of North Texas and a doctoral degree in Public Health Executive Leadership from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

U.S.A. Dr. Muswamba Mwamba, DrPH, MPH, IBCLC
Abstract:

Male breastfeeding support is evidenced to influence breastfeeding behaviors. Fathers play a vital role in determining women's choice to breastfeed. Many studies regarding fathers' breastfeeding influence included participants from a variety of ethnic backgrounds. Only a few studies examined African American men's breastfeeding attitudes. Within the U.S. disparity context, Black African immigrant breastfeeding experiences have not been measured.

The social and cultural breastfeeding experiences of Congolese Immigrants compared to those of African Americans were explored, analyzed, and contrasted. In the immigrant study, the breastfeeding cultural practice's visibility enables the breastfeeding perceptions of Congolese fathers. They identify their Congolese origin as a warrant for breastfeeding decisions and practice. Breastfeeding is a natural process that does not require prior deliberations between expectant couples. Breastmilk is valued for its God-given virtues rather than its medical benefits.

In the cultural context of African American, family, and friends enable breastfeeding support perceptions. Personal experiences and knowledge of breastfeeding benefits are predictors of breastfeeding decisions. However, there is not a cultural, existential framework supporting breastfeeding. This study's findings and recommendations guided the development of a dynamic African American men breastfeeding support toolkit designed to utilize existing public health structures.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.