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Lactation & Breastfeeding Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Lactation & Breastfeeding for professional training. These Lactation & Breastfeeding online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Lactation & Breastfeeding education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC

Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC, has a Master’s Degree in Community Health Education from the University of Oregon. She began working with breastfeeding families in 1992 and became an IBCLC in 1998. She has worked as a lactation consultant in private practice, for county and state public health programs, and in healthcare settings. She began teaching lactation training courses in 2003, and has taught in hospital, community and academic settings. She currently works in Portland Oregon for Legacy Health in high risk maternal and pediatric hospitals. She also teaches lactation courses at Portland State University School of Community Health. She is an active member of the Oregon Washington Lactation Association, the US Lactation Consultant Association, and the International Lactation Consultant Association. She was a founding Board Member for Northwest Mothers Milk Bank, a HMBANA non-profit donor milk bank.

USA Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC
Abstract:

Antibiotics were first prescribed in the last 1930’s and revolutionized the treatment of infections. Today, antibiotics are commonly used before, during and after birth to treat or prevent infection in mothers and babies. Although antibiotics can be highly effective, they can also cause adverse effects in mother and baby. When given to women around the time of birth, or to infants soon after birth, antibiotics may change the baby’s gut flora, and may interfere with the baby’s developing immune system. Globally, antibiotic resistance is rising, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. This presentation will review the current use of antibiotics for the treatment or prevention of infections in mothers and infants in hospital birth settings. We will discuss the benefits, risks, and alternatives to antibiotic use, and how these practices impact breastfeeding mothers and infants.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Michelle Emanuel, OTR/L, IBCLC, CST, NBCR

Michelle has been a pediatric neurodevelopmental Occupational therapist specializing in precrawling infants for over 26 years. She has specialty certifications and training in lactation, manual therapy, and pre and peri natal psychology. Michelle has specialized in optimal cranial nerve function and oral restrictions, with an emphasis on infant movement, innate biological imperatives and human potential, providing novel curriculums, support and resources for both professionals and parents. She enjoys collaborating and working in teams for babies and families going through the tethered oral tissues release process.

USA Michelle Emanuel, OTR/L, IBCLC, CST, NBCR
Abstract:

Cranial Nerve Dsyfunction, CND, is a term used to describe a disruption, dysregulation or dysfunction in one or more cranial nerves in the precrawling period. Cranial Nerves are twelve, paired nerves, ten of which originate in the brainstem. They mediate all incoming sensory input and also help regulate, move and maintain the health of the muscles of the face, head, neck, jaw, tongue and throat. From sensing mother’s smell, touch, taste to rooting, latching and coordinating suck/swallow/breathe patterns, optimal cranial nerve function is paramount. Lactation consultants need to be able to identify CND, identify a couple of treatment interventions and know when to refer to appropriate health care professional such as OT, PT, Speech, or Manual Therapist/Bodyworker. CND explains how many tongue/lip tied babies who have had a frenotomy continue to struggle significantly with the activities and movements of optimal breastfeeding. Michelle will cover the basics of CND, a simple classification system, and her 4 Principle Functional Movement Protocol, which she states can optimize cranial nerve function in the precrawling baby and improve breastfeeding outcomes.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Romania Mihaela Nita, MD, IBCLC

Mihaela Nita- MD, IBCLC, medical doctor (since 2007), specialized in pediatrics and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (since 2011), worked mainly to develop the profession of IBCLC in Romania. Organizer of the first IBCLC Day in Romania, is the co-founder and president of Romanian Lactation Consultant Association, member of ELACTA. Active in the field of lactation, organizing conferences, events, support groups, 90 hours training courses, CERPs accredited courses, fundraising events. On behalf of the Romanian Lactation Consultant Association, Mihaela Nita started the first volunteer work in the country, in the NICU of Marie Curie Emergency Children Hospital in Bucharest that led to the idea of implementing a human milk bank. Mihaela is passionate about training, advocating for the IBCLCs role and making a change for mothers, society and medical system in the field of lactation.

Romania Mihaela Nita, MD, IBCLC
Abstract:

Romania is one of the European countries with a very low breastfeeding rate. The emergence of IBCLCs in the past 2 decades helped in improving mothers access to lactation professionals. Starting from 2013 with the first celebration of IBCLC Day, conferences and courses, the awareness of a new profession raise.

Although in Europe there are more than 200 human milk banks, Romania does not have one. The limitations in the process of implementing a human milk bank in the NICU, the gap of legislation, the support of the civic society and 2 cases are discussed in the presentation.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 0.5  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter

Zainab Yate BSc, MSc (Medical Ethics & Law, Imperial College London, UK) is a biomedical ethicist, independent researcher and campaigner. She published the first peer-reviewed study looking specifically at breastfeeding/nursing aversion and agitation in 2017. Zainab is the leading international expert in Aversion and has recently published the only book on the topic with specialist publishers Pinter & Martin, London.

Zainab has been a breastfeeding peer supporter with the NHS for a number of years and is the owner of the only resource site for mothers and healthcare practitioners on aversion (www.breastfeedingaversion.com), where she researches and writes about aversion and why it arises. Zainab has helped thousands of women and families when breastfeeding triggers negative emotions, both Aversion and Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex, through her free structured support course and peer-to-peer support group online.

With a working background in public health and commissioning within the National Health Service (NHS), Zainab is currently vice-chair and named qualitative lead of the North London Research Ethics Committee, with the Health Research Authority (HRA) in the UK. Zainab is also a member of the King's College London Research Ethics, Governance Policy & Integrity Committee (KCL). In both roles, Zainab is a breastfeeding advocate and infant feeding research ethics expert for the committees.

United Kingdom Zainab Yate, Author, MSc, BSc, Breastfeeding Peer Supporter
Abstract:

Breastfeeding can trigger particular negative emotions and intrusive thoughts, these can include experiencing the phenomenon of breastfeeding/nursing aversion and agitation, or having the medical condition of Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex. Mothers. These don't preclude having postnatal depression or postnatal mood disorders.

Understanding the nuances and variations in all these conditions and symptoms can lead to better referral, intervention and treatment for those struggling with negative emotions associated with breastfeeding. Being prescribed antidepressants when you have D-MER or Aversion will not always alleviate the symptoms or help the situation.

We cover the literature about when breastfeeding can make someone feel bad, sad or mad, and what we know can help alleviate these negative emotions so as a lactation specialist or health care professional you will become well adept at assessing, referring, signposting, supporting and treating those who struggle. The information and skills you will gain will particularly help in complex cases or cases where there seems to be a missing link.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Nikki Lee, RN, BSN, MS, IBCLC, CCE, CIMI, ANLC, CKC, RYT

Nikki started as an LPN in 1971, got her RN and BSN, and a graduate degree. She is an author, a teacher, a holistic lactation consultant, a craniosacral therapy practitioner, and a baby body worker (teaching Infant Massage and TummyTime! She is mother to 2 wonderful (breastfed for a long time) daughters, wife to 3 interesting men, only one of whom was the right one for the past 37 years, Rafe!

Her publications include the books, Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Breastfeeding Therapy and A Breastfeeding Owner’s Manual; the monographs, “Benefits of Breastfeeding and Their Economic Impact” and “Sexuality and Breastfeeding” and the educational pamphlet “How to help yourself through labor”. She has been the reviews editor for the journal Clinical Lactation, and has worked as the lactation consultant for the division of Maternal, Child, and Family Health at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health since 2006.

U.S.A. Nikki Lee, RN, BSN, MS, IBCLC, CCE, CIMI, ANLC, CKC, RYT
Abstract:

This presentation will describe the 5-year journey to the creation and implementation of the 10 Steps to a Breastfeeding Friendly Shelter, starting with a key person, the prime mover, wondering, as she struggled in her resource-rich home with breastfeeding, "what do mothers experiencing homelessness do when they have trouble breastfeeding?" This question led to the formation of a committee, with the eventual outcome of a published policy paper and the Office of Homeless Services changing its provider contract to include accommodations for breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.