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Perinatal Mental Health Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Perinatal Mental Health for Postpartum professional training. These Perinatal Mental Health online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Perinatal Mental Health education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Focused Lecture Pack

An Introduction to Listening Visits in Perinatal Mental Health

By Dr. Jane Hanley, FRSPH, PhD, RGN, RMN, Dip Health Visiting, Dip Counselling, FETC
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Dr. Jane Hanley, FRSPH, PhD, RGN, RMN, Dip Health Visiting, Dip Counselling, FETC

Jane has worked in London, Swansea, Bahamas and Oman, as a Mental Health Nurse, Registered Nurse and Health Visitor. She retired from her last post as Senior Lecturer in Public and Mental Health, and now has honorary status. Jane was the first health visitor to be made the President of the United Kingdom Marcé Society and then the International Marcé Society for Perinatal Mental Health. She is currently on the Executive Board of the Marcé Society and is the Director of her training company in Perinatal Mental Health. Many of her courses have been accredited by the Continuing Professional Development Service. Jane is also working closely with the All Wales Perinatal Group and has been involved in many national and international groups.

UK Dr. Jane Hanley, FRSPH, PhD, RGN, RMN, Dip Health Visiting, Dip Counselling, FETC
Abstract:

This session is intended to help the Practitioner understand the process of perinatal mental health and how traditional practices are sometimes an integral part of the perinatal process. It also explores why good perinatal mental health is a prerequisite for a healthy lifestyle for both parent and infant. It examines some of the evidence for the efficacy of the Listening Visit and how the Practitioner can help.

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Presentations: 2  |  Hours / CE Credits: 2  |  Viewing Time: 3 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Melanie Badali, PhD, RPsych

Dr. Melanie Badali is a Registered Psychologist in British Columbia, Canada with over 20 years of experience working as a clinician, researcher, and instructor in the field of clinical psychology.

Dr. Badali currently provides psychological assessment and treatment services at the North Shore Stress and Anxiety Clinic, where she is on the Perinatal Services Team. She is certified in the practice of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) by the Canadian Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies and works with the organization to advance training, knowledge and accreditation in CBT. She has experience working in a variety of clinical settings including inpatient and outpatient, public and private.

She is also an Associate Faculty member at Yorkville University, where she teaches in the Master's of Counselling Psychology Program.

As a Board Director for Anxiety Canada, a non-profit organization that increases awareness, promotes education and provides resources for people dealing with anxiety, her role includes advocacy, research, knowledge translation and speaking to the media.

Dr. Badali is actively involved in research, training and writing. She enjoys creating psychoeducational resources such as the Canadian Psychological Association’s new factsheet on Perinatal Anxiety and is currently working on the third edition of the book, “Match Made on Earth”.


Canada Melanie Badali, PhD, RPsych
Abstract:

The perinatal period is a time of great transition and uncertainty. It is normal for women to experience increased stress and anxiety as they adjust to changes in their body and life. But experiencing anxiety is not the same as having an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders are associated with intense distress and significant impairment in functioning (which can include problems caring for self and baby). Anxiety Disorders are estimated to occur in 9% to 22% of women during pregnancy and 11% to 21% of women postpartum. The good news is that Anxiety Disorders are treatable. Psychotherapies such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) are effective and have no known contraindications for pregnant and breastfeeding women. The goal of this presentation is to help front line health care professionals recognize problematic anxiety during the perinatal period and identify evidence-based interventions.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E

Dr Justine Leach is an advocate for trauma-informed care in the perinatal period and co-founder of Resilient Birth, a company which trains healthcare providers and other perinatal professionals in supporting survivors giving birth. She also helps expectant parents with histories of trauma prepare for childbirth through trauma-informed childbirth education classes and birth support planning. Dr Leach became a B.A.C.E. certified childbirth educator and advocate after the birth of her two children revealed the impact of trauma experiences on childbirth. She has a Ph.D. on representations of sexual consent in narratives of rape and sexual trauma, and facilitates the Trauma-Informed Perinatal Professionals facebook group. Justine speaks about the experience of giving birth as a survivor of rape and the important role healthcare providers and perinatal professionals play in a birth giver’s experience of trauma or healing.

U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E
Abstract:

Survivors of trauma are at an increased risk not only of experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms during their pregnancy, but also birth trauma and postpartum PTSD. Yet too often survivors’ needs are ignored and traditional childbirth preparation is neither trauma-informed nor supportive of survivors’ emotional experiences. This presentation envisions what childbirth preparation looks like from a trauma-informed perspective. It will explore how to create safety in our relationships with birth givers, how to help survivors feel their power, and how to hold space for their emotional journey to parenthood. I discuss the impact of previous trauma on birth givers in pregnancy and birth, and explore what can be done prenatally to prevent birth trauma. Participants will gain practical skills for supporting survivors’ emotional wellbeing and for helping them to plan for a safe birth experience. This involves rethinking the birth plan. Instead of merely articulating a birth givers’ preferences for or against interventions, a birth plan should be rethought as a Birth Support Plan: that is, it should communicate what a birth giver needs to feel safe, understood, and in control of the decisions they make around their care whether their birth goes to plan or not.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Desirée is a perinatal psychotherapist, trained birth doula, Reiki practitioner, and owner of Motherland Community helping women decipher the funk of motherhood through her practice in Baltimore, MD. A mother of 2 boys, Desirée ignited her passion for perinatal mental health after experiencing undiagnosed postpartum depression and OCD. Using her own experience and compassion in hopes to heal others, Desirée completed training as a birth doula in 2014 and the Postpartum Support International’s Components of Care Training on PMADs in 2015. Since then, she has immersed her free time in PMAD (Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder) awareness. Additionally, she serves as a Maryland co-coordinator for PSI (Postpartum Support International), co-founder of the Perinatal Mental Health Alliance for Women of Color and her practice is a Perinatal Safe Spot through the National Perinatal Taskforce. Desirée’s philosophy is ‘every woman should be nurtured and cared for during her transition to motherhood. It is a rite of passage that has no manual, only the virtue of patience, sacrifice and sense of community that is necessary to hold space for a woman on the other side of birth.

Abstract:

African-American mothers experience birth and perinatal complications at a disproportionate rate. Thirty-eight percent of new mothers of color experience perinatal emotional complications like depression and anxiety. Women of color experience these complications at twice the rate of white women. Sixty percent of women of color do not receive treatment or support services for perinatal emotional complications. Reasons for this include lack of insurance coverage, social and cultural stigma, logistical barriers to services and lack of culturally appropriate care. This presentation will give a brief overview of racial trauma and its effects on perinatal outcomes for mothers of color, specifically African-American mothers, a template for a trauma-informed approach and examples of trauma-informed models of care to prevent negative outcomes.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Began exploring her interests in Natural Healing Arts and Complementary Medicine as a Midwife after the home birth of her first child in 1993. In the state of Florida, she completed her Diploma of Midwifery and graduated in 1997 from the School of Complementary Medicine in Central FL. Tomasina has many credentials in ethno-medicinal sciences, herbology, botanical chemistry, health & mental wellness counseling, education and spiritual facilitation work. Tomasina apprenticed with meta-physical healers, physicians and several other multi-disciplinary specialists to complete an internship as a Complementary Medicine Practitioner, and later became a Holistic Health Practitioner and Master Herbalist. She remains committed to building within communities of African descent to enhance social justice for all concerned. Her skill set is unparalleled in diverse treatment options for the well being of Families, Mothers and Babies as she has delivered double and well over 1000 babies since 2012. ANS(Autonomic Nerve System) Therapy, Iridology, Kinesiology, MT (Muscle Testing) and NLP(Neuro Linguistic Programming) are just a few other healing arts Midwife Tomasina has acquired expert proficiency in serving Clients for over 20 years. Having briefly served on the NARM (North American Registry Midwives) board, she is familiar with the nuances and intricacies of corporate Midwifery work and is excited to serve as Vice President for MANA (Midwives Alliance of North America).



Abstract:

Our live discussion with our experts will touch on the "health state of the mind and its processes for women of childbearing age" (and other definitions of black maternal mental health). Our discussion will further look at stressors, trauma and influences that impact black maternal mental health and in bringing awareness to the masses. We will ask if there are solutions that can yield a more hopeful, positive outcome as we look into these disparities.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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USA Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Psychological Trauma and was Founding Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, a position she held for 11 years. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of APA’s Publications and Communications Board.

USA Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA
Abstract:

We do not live in a perfect world. Many new mothers have experienced abuse and adversity as children. They often wonder whether they will perpetuate the cycle of violence that they have experienced. They may also have a history of depression and wonder whether this has harmed their children. Fortunately, we can offer new mothers hope. Recent studies have found that breastfeeding helps mothers mother—even when there is a history of abuse. It not about the milk; it’s the physical act of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding improves maternal sleep, lowers the risk of depression, lessens anger and irritability, and even attenuates the negative effects of past sexual assault. Breastfeeding offers mothers a chance to do things differently—to be a different kind of parent. When it comes to overcoming adversity, breastfeeding makes all the difference.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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South Africa Simone Honikman, MB ChB (UCT) MPhil-MCH (UCT)

Dr Simone Honikman is a medical doctor (UCT) with clinical experience in Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Psychiatry and a Masters degree in Maternal and Child Health (UCT). She is founder and director of the 15-year old Perinatal Mental Health Project (PMHP) based at UCT. The Project has received formal commendation by the World Health Organisation. Simone received the international Ashoka Fellowship for Social Entrepreneurship, has published academic papers, book chapters editorials and training manuals. She designs and conducts training for a wide range of healthcare and social service providers and consults to health policy and programme processes within South Africa. Through her involvement in several research consortia, she has collaborated with clinicians and researchers in high, low and middle income countries.

South Africa Simone Honikman, MB ChB (UCT) MPhil-MCH (UCT)
Abstract:

Perinatal common mental disorders (depression and anxiety) are highly prevalent, particularly in socio-economically adverse settings. These disorders are associated with substantial morbidity for mothers and their offspring, exerting impacts at multiple levels, and across generations. In high income settings, maternal suicide is rated among the leading causes of maternal mortality while contributing smaller, but notable proportions of maternal deaths in Low and Middle Income Countries. There is a growing body of evidence that integrating mental health care in to maternal and child care platforms, may be an effective and efficient way of addressing the unmet need faced by so many women.
The presentation will cover common perinatal mental disorders: epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and adverse impacts for mothers and infants. A practical approach to detection and management will be offered, aimed maternal care providers who are not mental health specialists.
The presentation will be particularly relevant for providers working in resource constrained settings, but will also have relevance for all perinatal care providers.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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USA Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Psychological Trauma and was Founding Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, a position she held for 11 years. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of APA’s Publications and Communications Board.

USA Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC, FAPA
Abstract:

Depression research contains many conclusions that appear to contradict each other regarding the role of breastfeeding. For example, breastfeeding lowers the risk of depression, but depression increases the risk that breastfeeding will fail. Moreover, breastfeeding problems increase women's risk of depression. These findings are not as contradictory as they may seem. By understanding the underlying physiological mechanism, we can understand these seemingly paradoxical findings. This presentation will describe the link between the stress and oxytocin systems, and how they relate to both maternal mental health and breastfeeding. When the stress system is upregulated, depression and breastfeeding difficulties follow. Conversely, when oxytocin is upregulated, maternal mental health and breastfeeding rates improve. This talk also includes the role of birth interventions and mother-infant sleep, as well as practical strategies that increase oxytocin.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 2  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1.25  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.