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Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Amber Valentine Forston, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, IBCLC, CNT

Amber Valentine Forston is a Speech-Language Pathologist who graduated from the University of Kentucky with her MS in Communication Disorders. She is a Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She recently received her credentials to become a Certified Neonatal Therapist (CNT). She worked for Baptist Health Systems, Inc for 8 years before moving to Florida where she worked for Wolfsons Children’s Hospital and Mayo Florida. She is now back in Kentucky working for Baptist Health Lexington. She has experience in adults and pediatrics with feeding and swallowing difficulties including: bedside swallow evaluations, Modified Barium Swallow studies, FEES, and pediatric feeding evaluations including NICU. She has experience with head and neck cancer patient including evaluation and treatment of swallowing difficulties, PMV use, and voice after total laryngectomy including TEP. She has provided guest lectures for the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville on feeding and swallowing topics. She has presented at the hospital level, local, state, national, and international levels on pediatric feeding/swallowing and breastfeeding.

USA Amber Valentine Forston, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, IBCLC, CNT
Abstract:

This presentation is designed to discuss the role of feeding therapy, breastfeeding, and family dynamics with infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome. These baby/family dynamics can be complex situations and feeding difficulties are extremely common. Breastfeeding education/information can be implemented prior to birth along with other education for families to promote more infant/family bonding and reduce stress of being born in substance exposure. Breastfeeding dramatically reduces stress signs in infants exposed to substances neonatally. Working together as an interdisciplinary team, we can set these families up for more successful feeding opportunities and decreased stress in developmental care.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 6 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Karen D’Apolito, PhD, NNP-BC, FAAN

Dr. Karen D’Apolito is a Professor and Program Director of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Program at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing. She has made national and international contributions to the care of drug-exposed infants through both education and research. Dr. D’Apolito received her PhD from the University of Washington, Seattle and her Post Masters Certificate as an NNP from the University of Tennessee, Memphis. In 2011 Dr. Apolito became a Fellow in American Academy of Nursing for her work with substance exposed infants. She developed a unique inter-observer reliability program to train healthcare professionals in assessing infants for signs of withdrawal. She has published numerous articles related to the effects of intra-uterine drug exposure on neonatal abstinence and has been an invited speaker to many local, national and international conferences to speak on this topic. Dr. D’Apolito has participated in two large multi-site clinical trials associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome and she recently completed a grant received from the TN Department of Health to identify the common treatment practices of infants with NAS within the state of TN.

USA Karen D’Apolito, PhD, NNP-BC, FAAN
Abstract:

Illicit and prescription drug abuse has reached epidemic proportions in our country. As a result, we are seeing many more infants being born with signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome. This presentation will address the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome among infants whose mothers consumed opioids and other drugs during pregnancy. Typical screening methods, assessment of the signs of withdrawal and management strategies will be discussed. The presentation will also discuss ways in which staff nurses can increase their inter-observer reliability when assessing infants for signs of neonatal abstinence. It is essential that adequate assessments be made by all who care for these infants so pharmacologic management can be instituted when needed. When the assessment of withdrawal is accurate and appropriate pharmacologic management is implemented infants will be able to better interact with their parents, tolerate their feedings and sleep for longer periods of time.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Kelly McGlothen-Bell, PhD, RN, IBCLC

Dr. Kelly McGlothen-Bell is an Assistant Professor at UT Health San Antonio, School of Nursing. As a nurse scientist, Dr. McGlothen-Bell is dedicated to understanding and resolving perinatal-infant health disparities in underrepresented groups, particularly among mother-infant dyads impacted by substance use disorders and preterm births. Dr. McGlothen-Bell uses interdisciplinary research, bio-behavioral methodologies, and community-engaged strategies to define and explore health priorities that can be remedied through culturally appropriate and sustainable health solutions. Her program of science focuses on understanding the relationship between infant feeding behaviors and readiness in high-risk infants and attunement between the primary caregiver and child during infancy and toddlerhood. The culmination of these findings contributes to the development of evidence-based interventions geared toward improving parental engagement and pediatric feeding success in marginalized populations. Dr. McGlothen-Bell has published numerous peer-reviewed articles related to developmental strategies for high-risk infants. She has also presented her work at conferences nationally and internationally. Dr. McGlothen-Bell has received numerous awards to include the 2019 National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) Mentee/Mentor Grant Award. She was also selected as a 2019-2020 Academy Jonas Nurse Policy Scholar.

USA Kelly McGlothen-Bell, PhD, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

As national rates of opioid use disorder continue to rise, the resulting impact on pregnant and parenting women and their children is immense. Severity of the central nervous system and gastrointestinal irritability in infants following prenatal opioid exposure, can affect their feeding behaviors and subsequently the caregiver-infant relationship. Feeding is a regulatory process that is difficult to characterize in prenatally opioid-exposed infants. As a result, caregivers, most often the mother, may struggle with feeding their infants. The complexity of an opioid use disorder for the mother and the subsequent opioid withdrawal of the infant may impede a mother’s ability to engage her irritable or sleepy baby.

Despite the known importance of feeding as a growth-fostering process, the evidence is lacking to guide recommendations for feeding management in this at-risk population. Evidence-based observational tools specific to the target population are warranted. Furthermore, feeding interactions between opioid- exposed infants and their caregivers need appropriate assessment and intervention to not only assist with the infant’s regulation and development of feeding skills, but also to support a nurturing feeding relationship. This presentation will shed new light on this important issue in infant feeding and highlight emerging research in the area.

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Presentations: 12  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Amber Valentine, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, IBCLC, CNT

Amber Valentine is a Speech-Language Pathologist who graduated from the University of Kentucky with her MS in Communication Disorders. She is a Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She worked for Baptist Health Systems, Inc for 8 years before moving to Florida where she worked for Wolfsons Children’s Hospital and Mayo Florida. She is now back in Kentucky working for Baptist Health Lexington. She has experience in adults and pediatrics with feeding and swallowing difficulties including: bedside swallow evaluations, Modified Barium Swallow studies, FEES, and pediatric feeding evaluations including NICU. She has provided guest lectures for the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville on feeding and swallowing topics. She has presented at the hospital level, local, state, national, and international levels on pediatric feeding/swallowing and breastfeeding.

Lillian Scott is a speech-language pathologist and certified lactation counselor employed by Baptist Health Lexington in Lexington, Kentucky. She received master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Gallaudet University. She received dual bachelor degrees in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Special Education from the University of Kentucky. She has worked with pediatrics and adults in the areas of speech, language, and swallowing. She has NICU, Mother/baby, and outpatient clinical experience working with feeding dyads of breast and bottle feeding infants. In the area of adults and pediatrics, she has experience with clinical swallowing evaluations and Modified Barium Swallow Studies. She has experience with adult Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluations of swallowing (FEES). Her interest is in successful feeding by mouth for infants with complex medical histories and promoting breastfeeding in cultures that are not likely to receive the supports for feeding difficulties due to knowledge, costs, and/or access.

USA Amber Valentine, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, IBCLC, CNT
Abstract:

Feeding is the most complex task of infancy, even in term babies with no complications. There are many diagnoses, conditions, syndromes, and co-morbidities that can impact feeding in neonates and infants. This talk will briefly highlight many of those, but we will focus on three specific populations of interest –Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Infants of Diabetic Mothers, and Downs Syndrome. We will discuss the specific implications these conditions can have on feeding, why these infants may have difficulty, and the classic symptoms one could expect to see. The differences between delayed and disordered feeding will also be addressed. Strategies and adaptions for breast feeding will be discussed. Positioning and external strategies will be explained. Case studies will be shared at the end of the presentation.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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I received my Neonatal Nurse Practitioner from Georgetown University and worked full time as NNP in a level IV NICU for 23 years. Subsequently I received a Family Nurse Practitioner Degree from State University of New York Health Science Center Syracuse and then a Post Master’s Degree as a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner from University of Buffalo specializing in Reproductive Psychiatry. For me, this brought my NICU practice full circle treating the entire family. In 2013 I transitioned to academia and am currently on faculty at the Pomeroy College of Nursing at Crouse Hospital. I also spearhead programs at Crouse Hospital for maternal mental health. I have been a lecturer/educator for NANN, AWHONN, New York State Nurse Practitioner Association and a variety of other venues.

Abstract:

Over the past decade NICU’s census has grown due drug dependent neonates. Some of the maternal drug use is necessary for medical conditions however the vast majority are mothers in a treatment program receiving either methadone or suboxone. NICU’s continue to strive for consistency in screening and treating infants. This presentation will describe a best practice in both screening and treatment. Also, because it is best practice to treat the entire NICU family the presentation will offer strategies in working with this sometimes challenging population.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 20.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Carol Wallman, DNP, APRN NNP-BC

Dr. Wallman is an Assistant Professor at the Loretto Heights School of Nursing and the Coordinator of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Program. She has over 30 years’ experience as an NNP with clinical experience ranging from low to high risk neonates including air transport. She has had a particular interest in perinatal substance use disorders and the impact on the neonate and family. She has been the co-chair of the Perinatal Substance Abuse Advisory Panel for UCHealth North and on the Colorado Substance Exposed Newborn Steering Committee since 2008. In 2015 she was the recipient of the Colorado Nightingale Award and in in 2006 the Distinguished Service in Neonatal Nursing Award from the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. She also served as the only nurse in the nation on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Fetus and Newborn where best practice standards for the care of neonates are developed and she currently serves on the Editorial Board of NeoReviews for the American Academy of Pediatrics.

United States Carol Wallman, DNP, APRN NNP-BC
Abstract:

States with legalized marijuana have faced increased use of marijuana by women during the perinatal period and complexities in decision making regarding management of infants exposed to marijuana through pregnancy and breastfeeding. Staff and family often report inconsistent messaging and practice management patterns among staff and providers in response to these patients. Results of a comprehensive literature search will be utilized to discuss the development and implementation of best practice strategies to address the unintended consequences of increased use of THC during pregnancy and breastfeeding correlating with the legalization of THC. This presentation will provide a review of current scientific evidence available to support the development of guidelines for consistent messaging and management of these newborns and their families during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Lisa Cleveland, PhD, RN, CPNP, IBCLC, FAAN

Dr. Lisa Cleveland is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and a tenured Associate Professor at UT Health San Antonio, School of Nursing. Her innovative research with mother-infant dyads impacted by opioid use has contributed to changes in clinical practice and improved outcomes. Her recovery residence, Casa Mia, is a collaborative partnership between the School of Nursing and the nonprofit, Crosspoint, Inc. Casa Mia provides safe and supportive housing for pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder where they can recover with their children.
In addition, the findings of Dr. Cleveland’s Maternal Opioid Morbidity Study are providing insight into the contextual factors surrounding maternal opioid use relapse and overdose deaths; the leading cause of maternal mortality in TX and a growing cause nationwide. Dr. Cleveland is now developing and psychometrically analyzing a brief screening instrument to help identify women at-risk for overdose death so they may be referred to life-saving resources. Further, Dr. Cleveland is leading the Texas Targeted Opioid Response to ensure access to Narcan: https://www.morenarcanplease.com/, and opioid overdose identification and reversal education. She is also leading a community paramedicine project to prevent overdose, increase the use of peer recovery services, and improve access to treatment.


USA Lisa Cleveland, PhD, RN, CPNP, IBCLC, FAAN
Abstract:

Between the 2000 and 2009, the use of opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain relievers, during pregnancy increased fivefold. Prenatal opioid exposure can result in newborn withdrawal symptoms often called Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS can include inconsolable crying, sleeplessness, and poor feeding. National rates of NAS have tripled since 2000. Opioid detoxification during pregnancy is not recommended and is linked to preterm labor and fetal distress. Therefore, it is recommended that pregnant women with opioid use disorder be stabilized on medication assisted treatment (MAT). However, these medications may still result in newborn withdrawal.
Treatment of NAS is typically focused on symptom management using soothing techniques and medications. Soothing techniques are non-pharmacological comfort measures and are considered the first line of care for infants with NAS. However, these techniques can be difficult to implement in a busy nursery environment. Medications may alleviate some NAS symptoms but, the use of medication is linked to a longer and more costly hospital stay and prolonged separation of mother and infant. As such, the purpose of this presentation is to explore best practices in the care of the opioid impacted mother-infant dyad with an emphasis on the important role of the biological mother.


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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.