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Breastmilk / Human Milk Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Breastmilk / Human Milk for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Breastmilk / Human Milk online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Breastmilk / Human Milk education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Webinar

Breast Milk and Sleep: Circadian Rhythms in Human Milk

By Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student

Briana Tillman received her undergraduate degree in International Relations from the United States Military Academy at West Point. She has been a La Leche League Leader for 9 years and is a board certified lactation consultant. After spending 10 years as a stay-at-home mom, she is currently attending medical school at Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colorado. She loves spending time with her husband and three elementary-school-aged children—as a family they like to play board games, go camping, and play bluegrass and chamber music.

United States Briana Tillman, IBCLC and LLL Leader, Osteopathic Medical Student
Abstract:

Many of us are aware of human milk’s amazing ability to provide for our infants’ changing nutritional needs with age. Recent research suggests that its composition shifts in synch with mom’s circadian rhythms as well, giving breastfed babies a leg up in neurological development, chrononutrition and sleep patterns. This presentation discusses the diurnal cycles of the following breast milk components: wakefulness vs. sleep-inducing amino acids, hormones (such as melatonin), trace elements, and even some nucleotides. Clinical implications include improving use of pumped breast milk. The presentation concludes with a brief look at other factors related to breastfeeding and infant sleep, including SIDS rates, skin-to-skin, and room sharing.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Webinar

Breast Milk: The Original SuperFood

By Sandy Jamieson, AA, La Leche League Leader, retired, and District Advisor, IBCLC
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Sandy Jamieson, AA, La Leche League Leader, retired, and District Advisor, IBCLC

Sandy LaVonne Jamieson became passionate about nutrition when her first baby suffered a series of painful ear infections which were cured by dietary supplements after allopathic medicines failed. She was an avid breastfeeding mom, La Leche League Leader, and currently works for the United States Women, Infant, Children Nutrition office helping moms and babies to meet their breastfeeding goals. She is the mother of six breast fed children and seven and eight-ninths grandchildren. Sandy is working to help babies regain their birthright.

USA Sandy Jamieson, AA, La Leche League Leader, retired, and District Advisor, IBCLC
Abstract:

An often overlooked component of breastfeeding education is nutrition. Professionals and moms seem to ‘know’ that breastfeeding is ‘best,’ but very few are aware of the critical differences between breast milk and formula. Consequently, they succumb to slick promotions that take advantage of their ignorance and convince them that artificial formula is so close to breast milk that it‘s ok to supplement or wean from breastfeeding completely. Find out what makes breast milk the original super food and learn how to teach parents nutrition basics that will help them make correct infant feeding decisions. A printable handout for parents is included.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Divya Sinha Parikh MD, IBCLC, FAAP is a board certified pediatrician practicing in Columbus, OH. She received her medical training at The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and completed her residency in general pediatrics at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital at Case Western Reserve University. During residency, she created a breastfeeding medicine clinical rotation.

Within her practice, she has extensive experience managing lactation concerns and has taken a special interest in mentoring current and aspiring breastfeeding providers. She has presented her work at local and national meetings.

Rachel Walker received her master’s degree in exercise science and wellness from Old Dominion University and a PhD in nutritional sciences from Penn State University. Her PhD work focused on lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. She has over 3 years of experience teaching both nutrition and exercise science courses.

In 2020, she was selected for a research fellowship from the United States Department of Agriculture for her study, ‘The Role of Metabolic Health and Lipid Metabolism in Human Lactation and Milk Composition’. Her current research is focused on the effects of insulin resistance during pregnancy and lactation, especially with the goal of developing therapies to improve lactation.

She has presented her research at numerous national meetings. Rachel’s proudest achievement is becoming Mommy to her 3 children, Clark, Lee, and Nora.

Abstract:

The fat content of breastmilk is remarkably important for infant health outcomes. Therefore, it is important to understand what factors affect breastmilk fat profile. Total fat is the main determinant of energy in breastmilk, and varies with time of day, length of lactation, and duration of the feed. Maternal factors also influence milk fat, including BMI, parity, and diabetes. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, like docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, are vital to the structure and development of the infant brain, and attaining the correct balance is important for optimal development. Breastmilk fatty acid concentration, especially the polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, are vital to infant brain development. Fatty acid concentrations primarily depend on diet and vary significantly between populations, but other maternal factors can also affect the fatty acid content of breastmilk.

Breastmilk fat content has significant implications for clinical practice. First, it is necessary to optimize clinical methods for human milk fat measurement, such as bedside human milk analyzers. Second, understanding milk fat variation will help optimize breastmilk fortification for infants in neonatal intensive care units. Finally, variability in donor milk also makes estimation of fat and energy in milk banks difficult, with important clinical implications for preterm infants who cannot receive mother’s own milk.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Blanca Aguilar Uscanga is a Biochemical Engineer in Food Science and has a Masters in Food Science. She graduated from the Institute Technologic of Veracruz (ITV) México. She completed her doctoral studies in the specialty of Biotechnology at the National Institute of the Sciences Appliqués of Toulouse in France.

She is currently a full-time research professor (since 2006) at the Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías (CUCEI) de la Universidad de Guadalajara. Dr. Aguilar Uscanga is adjunct professor to the Department of Pharmacobiology, where she teaches courses of Applied Microbiology, Biotechnology and Food Science to undergraduate and PhD students.

She is a member of the National System of Researchers in Mexico recognized by CONACYT, with level 2. The research areas are: Food Biotechnology and Microbiology, which cover different areas of research such as: Obtaining bioactive compounds and metabolites of industrial importance through of microorganisms, production and development of functional foods, fermented beverages, probiotics, prebiotics and food safety.

She has international collaborations with the Institute Armand Frappier, Canada and the Institut sur la nutrition et les aliments fonctionnels (INAF) in Québec. Currently she is member of INRS and has an honorable mention of “Professeure associée” provided by the INRS- the Institute Armand Frappier in Laval, Canada.

Abstract:

Human milk is the first food that the newborn receives and provides all the nutrients necessary for its growth. In order to feed children with breastfeeding problems, Human Milk Banks (BLH) were implemented, which conserve this food through pasteurization and freezing processes. Because human milk is very perishable, this work will present some results obtained on spray drying, high hydrostatic pressures, and UV radiation in human milk, in order to preserve and avoid loss of nutrients in this food, as well as offer a new alternative to the BLH for its conservation.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC

After studying biology at Meredith College in North Carolina, Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC spent the early part of her career sharing her love of science with middle school students. It was not until after the birth of her first child in 2007 and the challenges she faced breastfeeding that she became interested in pursuing a career in breastfeeding support. She enrolled at North Carolina State University to study human nutrition and completed the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative through the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute at UNC Chapel Hill in 2012. In the fall of 2013, she opened Harmony Lactation, LLC with the goal of helping mothers meet their breastfeeding goals. She recently completed her PhD in Nutrition and is a postdoctoral researcher at NCSU; her research focuses on breastfeeding education. She is also co-owner of Next Level Lactation, an educational and consulting company for lactation professionals.

USA Nicola Singletary, PhD, MAT, IBCLC
Abstract:

Some breastfeeding parents find that their stored milk tastes sour or rancid, and sometimes this milk is refused by their baby. These flavors and odors are often described as metallic, fishy, rancid, sweaty or soapy. But what exactly causes these ‘off’ flavors and what can be done about milk that is refused? Is the solution always to scald milk? Milk with high lipase action leads to milk with increased levels of free fatty acids during storage that can produce rancid and sweaty flavors. Enzymes such as lipase can be inactivated by heating prior to milk storage. Milk with high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids is susceptible to fat oxidation during storage leading to fishy and metallic flavors. Storage recommendations to reduce oxidation of fatty acids in milk include using short storage times, thawing at cold temperatures, and avoiding light exposure during storage. Case studies of both oxidized milk and high lipase action will be presented along with possible solutions.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.0  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 2  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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I was born in Detroit Michigan and graduate from M.L. King High School in 2001. I completed a B.S. in Chemistry at Oakland University in Michigan and Ph.D. in Chemistry at Vanderbilt University. After completing postdoctoral research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, I began an independent career at Vanderbilt In 2014.


Abstract:

When antibiotics were first broadly introduced in the 1930s, they were considered the most important advancement in modern medicine. Deaths attributed to communicable diseases were drastically reduced leading to the belief that infectious diseases were conquerable. Bacteria, however, counter antibiotic chemotherapy with resistance mechanisms that result in the emergence of infections untreatable by the current artillery of therapeutics. Efforts to develop new antimicrobial agents with unique structural motifs and novel modes of action to fight multi-drug resistant pathogens are ongoing. During this seminar, I will discuss our groups ongoing efforts to develop human milk oligosaccharides as novel antimicrobial agents.


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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Michal Ann Young, M.D., FAAP, FABM

Michal A. Young, M.D., FAAP, FABM is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at Howard University College of Medicine. She also serves as the Medical Director of the B.L.E.S.S. (Breastfeeding Lactation Education Support Services) Initiative as well as Director of the NICU and Newborn Services, at Howard University Hospital. She is a graduate of Howard University College of Medicine, Class of 1979. Dr. Young completed a rotating internship in Medicine and Pediatrics at Grady Memorial and Emory Hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, followed by a Pediatric residency in the Howard University Hospital/D.C. General Hospital Combined Program, and a fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Georgetown University Hospital.

Dr. Young has several publications and presentations over a range of topics governing infant care. Her research interests are in developmental outcomes of the ELBW, HIV perinatal transmission, the Diabetic Dyad and in breastfeeding education for professionals and parents.

She is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha, a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (sections on Perinatal Medicine and Breastfeeding), a Fellow and member of the Board of Directors of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (Chairman of its Protocol Committee), member of the National Medical Association (a Past Chair of its Pediatric Section), Member of the Board of Directors for the D.C. Breastfeeding Coalition, Member of the Board of Directors for ROSE: Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere, Inc., one of the Chapter Breastfeeding Coordinators for the D.C. Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and Board Member of the Prolacta Bioscience Foundation.

U.S.A. Michal Ann Young, M.D., FAAP, FABM
Abstract:

Human milk provides multiple layers of immune protection to the newborn by providing bioactive components that protect the infant from pathogenic infection, facilitate immune development and establish a healthy gut microbiome. This presentation will review the cellular and humoral components of human milk that help provide this protection. Additionally, the nutritional components of human milk that also contribute to its immune impact will be briefly explored. The long-term protective effect of breast milk on adult illnesses and disease and its presumed role will be discussed. Lastly the impact milk storage, milk banking practices and use of donor milk as mechanisms to provide immune support to the newborn will be considered. An interactive power point presentation will be used to deliver this important topic.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD is a TEDx and international speaker, author, pregnancy and lactation expert, and consultant. She served as the Executive Director of Lactation Programs for CAPPA, the Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association for 16 years and now is on the Senior Advisor Board. She served on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee from 2016-2019. She also is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. She owns MotherJourney, focusing on training perinatal professionals on integrative and holistic information regarding pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. She has her degree in Maternal Child Health: Lactation Consulting and is an internationally board certified lactation consultant. As the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever, original Editor of the CAPPA Lactation Educator Manual, and contributing author to Round the Circle: Doulas Talk About Themselves, she loves to blend today’s recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for nearly three decades and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into parenthood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD
Abstract:

Breastmilk has long been understood to be a pathway towards long-term health for both mother and child. The specific mechanisms for how this communication works has long been studied and today many researchers believe that messenger RNAs and stem cells contribute in many ways to appropriate developmental pathways for the baby and cause gene activation that promotes health for life. mRNA in breastmilk can also be influenced by the time of day and even the timing of the babies delivery, becoming adaptive for the baby’s unique needs. Not only do these messenger RNA communicate important genetic information to the baby via breastmilk, changes in the mothers body via mRNA occur during lactation responding to a new “mothering” focus during the period of lactation. This may impact the mother’s postpartum mental states, adaptation to stress, and changes in fatty acids. This presentation highlights some of the fascinating studies that demonstrate the myriad of ways that stem cells and mRNA during lactation become the ultimate communicators, affecting change for years to come.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1.25  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD is a TEDx and international speaker, author, pregnancy and lactation expert, and consultant. She served as the Executive Director of Lactation Programs for CAPPA, the Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association for 16 years and now is on the Senior Advisor Board. She served on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee from 2016-2019. She also is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. She owns MotherJourney, focusing on training perinatal professionals on integrative and holistic information regarding pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. She has her degree in Maternal Child Health: Lactation Consulting and is an internationally board certified lactation consultant. As the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever, original Editor of the CAPPA Lactation Educator Manual, and contributing author to Round the Circle: Doulas Talk About Themselves, she loves to blend today’s recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for nearly three decades and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into parenthood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD
Abstract:

It is an amazing feat that the female human can grow and nourish another human body. The two main organs that support this incredible venture are the placenta and breastmilk. There are some research theories that suggest that the maternal link between baby and mother created by the placenta is continued beyond pregnancy through the next vital maternal/baby organ, breastmilk. These two unique organs have many similar properties. They take cues from the maternal environment to change nutrition, hormones, and other developmental and immunological properties that are being sent to the baby. The placenta and breastmilk deliver properties to the baby solely based on its needs and changing environment. The role of both organs is to protect, defend, and support the development of the child. Each organ is perceptive and continuously fine tunes the delivery of essential molecules to the baby. They are intelligent organs, deciphering the environment and using that information to the benefit of the child. The placenta detects the mother’s emotions, nutritional state, and state of anxiety and sends messenger molecules and hormones to the baby to aide the baby’s development in a way that allows it to thrive in its future home outside the womb. Breastmilk has similar capabilities, using GALT and MALT and SIgA to help the baby’s brain, body, and immune system function in its unique world. This presentation takes you on a journey inside these organs to give you a profound lesson in the physical ties between mother and baby.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD

Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD is a TEDx and international speaker, author, pregnancy and lactation expert, and consultant. She served as the Executive Director of Lactation Programs for CAPPA, the Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association for 16 years and now is on the Senior Advisor Board. She served on the Board of Directors for the United States Breastfeeding Committee from 2016-2019. She also is on the Advisory Board for InJoy Health. She owns MotherJourney, focusing on training perinatal professionals on integrative and holistic information regarding pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. She has her degree in Maternal Child Health: Lactation Consulting and is an internationally board certified lactation consultant. As the co-author of two books, The Attachment Pregnancy and The Greatest Pregnancy Ever, original Editor of the CAPPA Lactation Educator Manual, and contributing author to Round the Circle: Doulas Talk About Themselves, she loves to blend today’s recent scientific findings with the mind/body/spirit wisdom. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for nearly three decades and has two wonderful grown sons, whose difficult births led her on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She believes that the journey into parenthood is a life-changing rite of passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

U.S.A. Laurel A. Wilson, IBCLC, RLC, BSc, CLE, CCCE, CLD
Abstract:

As humans evolved, the milk specific to nourishing, protecting, and developing their babies went through an incredible transformation. The unique demands of having placentas, growing large brains, and making milk for infants that required rapid maturation post-delivery led to a unique set of neohormones. Neohormones not only facilitate reproduction in the mammal, but they direct the development of mammary tissue and are a significant component of human milk. Neohormones interact with the epigenome and microbiome, targeting certain genes to lead to reproductive success for the mammal. Human milk prepares the infant’s epigenome and microbiome for long-term health and adaptation to the environment. Learn about these fascinating components in human milk and the extraordinary role they play in human development.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.