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Neonatal Substance Exposure Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Neonatal Substance Exposure for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Neonatal Substance Exposure online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Neonatal Substance Exposure education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Kelly McGlothen-Bell, PhD, RN, IBCLC

Dr. Kelly McGlothen-Bell is an Assistant Professor at UT Health San Antonio, School of Nursing. As a nurse scientist, Dr. McGlothen-Bell is dedicated to understanding and resolving perinatal-infant health disparities in underrepresented groups, particularly among mother-infant dyads impacted by substance use disorders and preterm births. Dr. McGlothen-Bell uses interdisciplinary research, bio-behavioral methodologies, and community-engaged strategies to define and explore health priorities that can be remedied through culturally appropriate and sustainable health solutions. Her program of science focuses on understanding the relationship between infant feeding behaviors and readiness in high-risk infants and attunement between the primary caregiver and child during infancy and toddlerhood. The culmination of these findings contributes to the development of evidence-based interventions geared toward improving parental engagement and pediatric feeding success in marginalized populations. Dr. McGlothen-Bell has published numerous peer-reviewed articles related to developmental strategies for high-risk infants. She has also presented her work at conferences nationally and internationally. Dr. McGlothen-Bell has received numerous awards to include the 2019 National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) Mentee/Mentor Grant Award. She was also selected as a 2019-2020 Academy Jonas Nurse Policy Scholar.

USA Kelly McGlothen-Bell, PhD, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

As national rates of opioid use disorder continue to rise, the resulting impact on pregnant and parenting women and their children is immense. Severity of the central nervous system and gastrointestinal irritability in infants following prenatal opioid exposure, can affect their feeding behaviors and subsequently the caregiver-infant relationship. Feeding is a regulatory process that is difficult to characterize in prenatally opioid-exposed infants. As a result, caregivers, most often the mother, may struggle with feeding their infants. The complexity of an opioid use disorder for the mother and the subsequent opioid withdrawal of the infant may impede a mother’s ability to engage her irritable or sleepy baby.

Despite the known importance of feeding as a growth-fostering process, the evidence is lacking to guide recommendations for feeding management in this at-risk population. Evidence-based observational tools specific to the target population are warranted. Furthermore, feeding interactions between opioid- exposed infants and their caregivers need appropriate assessment and intervention to not only assist with the infant’s regulation and development of feeding skills, but also to support a nurturing feeding relationship. This presentation will shed new light on this important issue in infant feeding and highlight emerging research in the area.

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Presentations: 12  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Lisa Cleveland, PhD, RN, CPNP, IBCLC, FAAN

Dr. Lisa Cleveland is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and a tenured Associate Professor at UT Health San Antonio, School of Nursing. Her innovative research with mother-infant dyads impacted by opioid use has contributed to changes in clinical practice and improved outcomes. Her recovery residence, Casa Mia, is a collaborative partnership between the School of Nursing and the nonprofit, Crosspoint, Inc. Casa Mia provides safe and supportive housing for pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder where they can recover with their children.
In addition, the findings of Dr. Cleveland’s Maternal Opioid Morbidity Study are providing insight into the contextual factors surrounding maternal opioid use relapse and overdose deaths; the leading cause of maternal mortality in TX and a growing cause nationwide. Dr. Cleveland is now developing and psychometrically analyzing a brief screening instrument to help identify women at-risk for overdose death so they may be referred to life-saving resources. Further, Dr. Cleveland is leading the Texas Targeted Opioid Response to ensure access to Narcan: https://www.morenarcanplease.com/, and opioid overdose identification and reversal education. She is also leading a community paramedicine project to prevent overdose, increase the use of peer recovery services, and improve access to treatment.


USA Lisa Cleveland, PhD, RN, CPNP, IBCLC, FAAN
Abstract:

Between the 2000 and 2009, the use of opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain relievers, during pregnancy increased fivefold. Prenatal opioid exposure can result in newborn withdrawal symptoms often called Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS can include inconsolable crying, sleeplessness, and poor feeding. National rates of NAS have tripled since 2000. Opioid detoxification during pregnancy is not recommended and is linked to preterm labor and fetal distress. Therefore, it is recommended that pregnant women with opioid use disorder be stabilized on medication assisted treatment (MAT). However, these medications may still result in newborn withdrawal.
Treatment of NAS is typically focused on symptom management using soothing techniques and medications. Soothing techniques are non-pharmacological comfort measures and are considered the first line of care for infants with NAS. However, these techniques can be difficult to implement in a busy nursery environment. Medications may alleviate some NAS symptoms but, the use of medication is linked to a longer and more costly hospital stay and prolonged separation of mother and infant. As such, the purpose of this presentation is to explore best practices in the care of the opioid impacted mother-infant dyad with an emphasis on the important role of the biological mother.


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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.