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Late Preterm Infants Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Late Preterm Infants for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Late Preterm Infants online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Late Preterm Infants education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Angela Lober, PhD, RNC, IBCLC

Angela Lober has been an educator and clinician for over 19 years. She has been an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant since 2005 providing evidence-based care within an academic medical center and within her community. Angela is the Director of the Arizona State University Lactation Education Programs offering on-line and academic elective on breastfeeding and lactation. She completed her PhD at Arizona State University's College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation focused on the breastfeeding complexities of late preterm infants.

United States Angela Lober, PhD, RNC, IBCLC
Abstract:

Late preterm infants struggle with feeding challenges. Due to the oscillating nature of breastfeeding progress in the late preterm population coupled with the innate issues of prematurity, families need support to navigate waters toward breastfeeding success. A model for evidence-based education and breastfeeding assessment will be presented to support infant development and empower mothers to achieve their breastfeeding goals.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Debbie Fraser, MN, RNC-NIC

Deb Fraser, MN, RNC-NIC is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Nurse Practitioner program in the Faculty of Health Disciplines at Athabasca University. She holds an appointment in the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Manitoba (U of M). Debbie maintains an active practice in the NICU at St Boniface General Hospital and is the Editor-in-Chief of Neonatal Network: The Journal for Neonatal Nursing. She is the author of two nursing textbooks and over 70 book chapters and peer-reviewed articles on topics related to high-risk newborns. Debbie was recently awarded the Canadian Nurses’ Association Order of Merit for nursing education.

Canada Debbie Fraser, MN, RNC-NIC
Abstract:

Late preterm infants (LPI) are sometimes called the great pretenders. They look mature, sometimes evening weighing as much as their term counterparts. Despite that, LPI infants are at increased risk of both short- and long-term complications. This presentation will review the incidence and etiology of late preterm deliveries and will discuss the short and long-term morbidities experienced by this group of infants. Strategies to mitigate these issues will also presented.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Jacek Debiec is a Child & Adolescent and Perinatal Psychiatrist, and a Developmental Neuroscientist. He received his MD/PhD from Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland and completed his Psychiatry Residency, Fellowship in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, as well as Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at New York University, New York. His research interests include early life emotional learning with a special focus on infant attachment and fear learning. Dr. Debiec’s research findings have been published in top scientific journals. He received recognition especially for his work on memory reconsolidation and mother-to-infant transfer of fear and anxiety. Dr. Debiec lectures nationally and internationally and is a recipient of several awards and honors, including Fulbright Fellowship, Herder Fellowship, Neil Miller New Investigator Award from Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, Donald F. Klein Early Career Investigator Award from Anxiety & Depression Association of America and other.

Abstract:

A child learns what is safe and what is threatening from the caregiver. Yet, what is safe and what is dangerous changes during development suggesting that the supporting learning neural circuitry must also change. For instance, young children might perceive separation from the caregiver as a potential threat and proximity to the caregiver as safety. This requires an involvement of a learning system encoding the characteristics of the caregiver and evoking approach responses to a caregiver, while absence of caregiver cues might be perceived as a threat. With maturation, a child acquires an ability to leave the caregiver for brief periods of time and the presence of a more complex system able to identify environmental dangers is required. This lecture will discuss recent studies in developmental neurobiology providing insight into the brain mechanisms of safety and fear learning in infancy and their implications for health and disease.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.