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Fathers in Perinatal Care Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Fathers in Perinatal Care for PREGNANCY, LABOUR & CHILDBIRTH professional training. These Fathers in Perinatal Care online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Fathers in Perinatal Care education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Yale Nogin is the creator of The Hero Dad™ Program taught at Piedmont and Kennestone Hospitals in Atlanta, GA and is the author of The Hero Dad’s Infant Manual. He has been teaching classes for expecting, new and adopting fathers over the last 15 years and counting.

His program focuses on empowering men with relevant principles, skills, systems and behaviors that earn respect from their partners which enable the couples to co-create a relaxed home environment. Being a new father with an Infant management system, post-partum support skills, and a system for “listening to understand” help new fathers feel confident and willing to participate early on which helps keep them invested in their family.

Dr. Nogin is passionate about preventing the fatherlessness epidemic from getting worse. The time surrounding birth is a crucial time to equip men with skills to help navigate the many changes and responsibilities that come with being a parent and partner so men want to come home at night.


Abstract:

The perinatal period is a pivotal point in lives of both expecting mother and father. This time period can prove to be a perfect opportunity for the birthing community to help men engage with their upcoming role and responsibilities of fatherhood and “husband-hood w/baby”. If we are able to positively influence men to be engaged with their new family from the beginning we can increase the odds of positive birth outcomes. Unfortunately, men report to feel “left out” and “marginalized” during the prenatal visits, education and delivery. To create a change and help create better family outcomes we must work together to bring men more into the fold during this time period. We will discuss ways in which the birth community can help men such as being more conscious of where men are emotionally during the perinatal visits and by using positive reinforcement of what new relevant fatherhood and masculine behavior looks like such as the ability to listen and understand our partners, self-awareness and self-control as well as our openness to grow and learn these modern behaviors and skills that most men today have not been exposed to in order to the respect they are seeking from their partners and children.

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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Trinidad Debrah Lewis, CNM, MSc

Since graduating with a Masters Degree majoring in Maternal-Child Health from Columbia University in 1986, Debrah has worked in public and private practice midwifery in New York, Africa and Trinidad & Tobago.

She is a founder and current Executive Director of Mamatoto Resource & Birth Centre in Trinidad where she remains in active midwifery practice. She is on the Board of the North West Regional Health Authority; works with the Nursing Council; and serves as an independent consultant on midwifery matters. Debrah precepts students from the USA, Canada and Europe, and has presented extensively regionally and internationally, including a TEDx Talk on fathers.

She was the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) Americas Board Member from 2005 – 2011 and Vice-President from 2011 - 2014; a founding member of the Trinidad & Tobago Association of Midwives; and spearheaded the formation of the Caribbean Regional Midwives Association in 2012.

Debrah is the recipient of several awards including the Dorothea M. Lang Pioneer Award and a National Award for The Development of Women – Gold – for her work in Community Service and Midwifery in Trinidad & Tobago.


Trinidad Debrah Lewis, CNM, MSc
Abstract:

Traditionally, health care services target mothers – and engaging fathers has generally been overlooked. As a result fathers feel excluded and unsupported.
However, there has been growing recognition of the importance of parenting partnerships and fathers’ contribution to children’s development. As a result services are becoming more conscious of this. In a recent survey midwives agreed that including fathers is a part of their role but generally did not feel educated or well prepared to do this.
Individual providers and maternity care services must review the care they provide to assess their policies and resources, for example, and how they promote father and family inclusive care.


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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Duncan Fisher promotes and develops support for parents to advance child health and development. In the last year he has been working with breastfeeding researchers across the world and with the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action to advance the idea of "breastfeeding as teamwork", following striking findings from research of the high gains from engaging with fathers and other family members. In UK he co-founded the Fatherhood Institute and for three years he served on the Board of the Government’s gender equality body, the Equal Opportunities Commission. He manages the website, FamilyIncluded.com, where all recent research on breastfeeding and fathers/families is reported. He initiated and currently manages a website for Cambridge and Princeton Universities reporting research on child welfare and development, ChildandFamilyBlog.com. He was awarded an OBE by the Queen in 2008 for his “services to children”. Duncan lives in Wales and divides his time between family work and work to support sustainable economic development in his home country.

Abstract:

I will address seven questions. (1) Why we should engage fathers? (2) What does the World Health Organisation say on this? (3) What are the needs and motivations of fathers? (4) What biological and brain changes take place in men when they cuddle a baby? (5) What difference does engaging fathers make to health outcomes for mother and baby? (6) How to organise engagement with fathers in a health service? (7) Why is it so difficult to maintain strong engagement with fathers?

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Duncan Fisher promotes and develops support for parents to advance child health and development. In the last year he has been working with breastfeeding researchers across the world and with the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action to advance the idea of "breastfeeding as teamwork", following striking findings from research of the high gains from engaging with fathers and other family members. In UK he co-founded the Fatherhood Institute and for three years he served on the Board of the Government’s gender equality body, the Equal Opportunities Commission. He manages the website, FamilyIncluded.com, where all recent research on breastfeeding and fathers/families is reported. He initiated and currently manages a website for Cambridge and Princeton Universities reporting research on child welfare and development, ChildandFamilyBlog.com. He was awarded an OBE by the Queen in 2008 for his “services to children”. Duncan lives in Wales and divides his time between family work and work to support sustainable economic development in his home country.

Abstract:

Breastfeeding programmes that engage fathers are more effective than ones that only involve mothers and professionals. This accords with research that has shown that family is the main influence on breastfeeding. The way that families influence breastfeeding is diverse, depending on the make-up of the family, local culture and location (e.g. urban/rural). The influence of fathers is not necessarily intentional, but what fathers think and do influences the situation in almost every situation. In this presentation I will describe the principles of success that have been learned from programmes with published evaluations. These principles can be summed up in the phrase recently adopted by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, "breastfeeding is teamwork".

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Brian is the Provincial Coordinator for Dad Central Ontario, which is devoted to promoting responsible father involvement in Ontario, Canada and has acted as a catalyst for other provinces and territories within Canada to form their own regional father initiatives. He has taught and trained extensively on understanding fatherhood and ways to engage men as parents. He is also a Marriage and Family Therapist in Toronto. He brings an important perspective to the couple relationship in families, where trust and respect are key elements to building strong families. He is married with three teenage daughters.

Abstract:

Men are becoming more and more involved in the lives of their children and this is clearly beginning from the moment they hear they are going to be a daddy. The role of an involved, purposeful father is an important aspect of healthy development in children and therefore, in order to support this, it is vital that we understand the dynamics of the father-child relationship. The Father Factor will focus on how to encourage men to define their role as a father. We will also discuss the unique pathway of bonding and attachment that occurs between dads and kids. The pathway is one of activation and exploration. Further, we will highlight how this plays out in fathering practice and how this impacts a child’s development.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Mark Harris is registered as a midwife and nurse. He loves being around people, and has for as long as he can remember.  Having five sisters and three brothers has afforded Mark with plenty of practice and now with six children of his own and 6 grandchildren, he has lots of opportunity to indulge his people passion.
The choices he has made in his professional life have been shaped by this gregarious inclination. Mark has  trained and worked as a Nurse, Midwife, Teacher in Further Education, hypnotherapist, NLP trainer, and outreach youth worker. He still works as a Midwife offering  birth education through a program called, Birthing For Blokes. He states that for him, work and play often merge. Mark is the author of the newly released book "Men, Love and Birth", and together with doula Karen Hall, he produces Sprogcast, which is a podcast about pregnancy, birth and early parenthood.

Abstract:

Men and women experience the world differently, has become a little controversial to say that, but own experience of relating to men and women in our day to day lives probably bears it out, not to mention pop songs and our cultural references to relationships between the sexes. If we were to look into the history books we would find multiple examples of different cultures expressing the same phenomena, the Chinese, with ying and yang and the ancient understanding of the Indian sub continent through shakti and shiver. ‘Modern science’, with its emphasis on our evolutionary adaptive history roots; the differences in an understanding of our struggle to survive as a species of mammal. After 20 years of being present for hundreds of births and watching the feminine/masculine dance of birth unfold, I think I have some insights that can support, not only men as they dance the dance of being with the one they love as she births, but also birth professionals as they seek to communicate to men about birth and breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 18  |  Hours / CE Credits: 17.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Webinar

The Importance of Fathers' Mental Health

By Dr. Jane Hanley, Phd, RGN, RMN, Dip HV, Dip Couns FRSPH
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Dr. Jane Hanley, Phd, RGN, RMN, Dip HV, Dip Couns FRSPH

Jane has been interested and concerned with perinatal mental health(PMH) for over 35 years. During this time Jane has researched attitudes, ethnic beliefs and the mental health of fathers around this time. She is an honorary Lecturer on PMH at Swansea University and is a Past President of the International Marcé Society for Perinatal Mental Health. She is a currently on the Executive Board. She is also on several PMH committees, both nationally and internationally. Jane has written 2 books on PMH and is in the process of writing a third. She has written many peer reviewed articles and has been a speaker at national and international conferences. Jane is the Director of the PMH Training Company which, working in partnership with other experts in the field, including Mark Williams, delivers high quality training to health professionals and those practitioners concerned with families affected by perinatal mental disorders and illness.

Mark Williams is a keynote speaker, author and International campaigner. In 2004 he himself experienced depression and suffered in silence for years until a breakdown. He founded International Fathers Mental Health Day and #Howareyoudad campaign to make sure all parents are having support for the whole family.

Mark has spoken on television and radio stations around the world and works with Dr Jane Hanley who has both published articles on Fathers Mental Health together. Mark was awarded Inspirational father of the year and local hero at the Pride of Britain Awards in 2012 and was invited to meet The Royal Family on World Mental Health Day in 2016.


UK Dr. Jane Hanley, Phd, RGN, RMN, Dip HV, Dip Couns FRSPH
Abstract:

The importance of fathers’ mental health is increasingly recognized as a significant factor in family life. As the construct of traditional society changes, it is becoming more commonplace for the father to be the primary carer of the infant. Should the mother suffer from a mental illness or disorder, then often the father is her main carer too. Studies have shown that if the father also suffers from mental ill health, this can have a significant impact on the relationship with the mother and have a detrimental effect on the development of the infant. Historically, men are conscious of their role as the provider and protector. The social expectations of men often preclude them from disclosing their feelings; therefore there is a tendency for them to confide their personal concerns to smaller networks of individuals, as they often fear they risk rejection should they admit to them publically. Studies have shown that if the complexities of their relationship with the partner are too much of an encumbrance, fathers often become distressed, frustrated and either withdraw into an activity or sport with which they feel more in control or resort to negative coping skills and misuse drugs and /or alcohol. They are more likely to ask for help when they experience suicide ideation. There are approximately 6,000 suicides annually in the UK.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.