GOLD Learning Speakers

UK

Dr. Jane Hanley, Phd, RGN, RMN, Dip HV, Dip Couns FRSPH

Mark Williams

  • Speaker Type: Mental Health in the Perinatal Period Lecture Pack
  • Country: UK
Biography:

Jane has been interested and concerned with perinatal mental health(PMH) for over 35 years. During this time Jane has researched attitudes, ethnic beliefs and the mental health of fathers around this time. She is an honorary Lecturer on PMH at Swansea University and is a Past President of the International Marcé Society for Perinatal Mental Health. She is a currently on the Executive Board. She is also on several PMH committees, both nationally and internationally. Jane has written 2 books on PMH and is in the process of writing a third. She has written many peer reviewed articles and has been a speaker at national and international conferences. Jane is the Director of the PMH Training Company which, working in partnership with other experts in the field, including Mark Williams, delivers high quality training to health professionals and those practitioners concerned with families affected by perinatal mental disorders and illness.

Mark Williams is a keynote speaker, author and International campaigner. In 2004 he himself experienced depression and suffered in silence for years until a breakdown. He founded International Fathers Mental Health Day and #Howareyoudad campaign to make sure all parents are having support for the whole family.

Mark has spoken on television and radio stations around the world and works with Dr Jane Hanley who has both published articles on Fathers Mental Health together. Mark was awarded Inspirational father of the year and local hero at the Pride of Britain Awards in 2012 and was invited to meet The Royal Family on World Mental Health Day in 2016.


CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
The Importance of Fathers' Mental Health
The importance of fathers’ mental health is increasingly recognized as a significant factor in family life. As the construct of traditional society changes, it is becoming more commonplace for the father to be the primary carer of the infant. Should the mother suffer from a mental illness or disorder, then often the father is her main carer too. Studies have shown that if the father also suffers from mental ill health, this can have a significant impact on the relationship with the mother and have a detrimental effect on the development of the infant. Historically, men are conscious of their role as the provider and protector. The social expectations of men often preclude them from disclosing their feelings; therefore there is a tendency for them to confide their personal concerns to smaller networks of individuals, as they often fear they risk rejection should they admit to them publically. Studies have shown that if the complexities of their relationship with the partner are too much of an encumbrance, fathers often become distressed, frustrated and either withdraw into an activity or sport with which they feel more in control or resort to negative coping skills and misuse drugs and /or alcohol. They are more likely to ask for help when they experience suicide ideation. There are approximately 6,000 suicides annually in the UK.
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: