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Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion for PREGNANCY, LABOUR & CHILDBIRTH professional training. These Diversity, Equity & Inclusion online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Diversity, Equity & Inclusion education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Jennie Joseph, a British-trained midwife and women’s health advocate, moved to the United States in 1989 and began a journey which has culminated in the formation of an innovative maternal child healthcare system, The JJWay®

She is the Executive Director of her own non-profit corporation Commonsense Childbirth Inc. which operates two health centers in Orlando, Florida.

Due to the poor birth outcomes experienced by low income and uninsured women she has established outreach clinics for women who are at risk of not receiving prenatal or gynecological care. Her ‘Easy Access’ Prenatal Care Clinics offer quality maternity healthcare for all, regardless of their choice of delivery site or ability to pay and have successfully reduced perinatal disparities

Jennie’s school, Commonsense Childbirth School of Midwifery, trains and certifies midwives, doulas and perinatal paraprofessionals emphasizing culturally competent and community focused care. Her midwifery model of care can be implemented by any willing provider.

Abstract:

The impact of poor perinatal outcomes and racial disparities on women, their families and the community at large. What are the causes and who suffers disproportionately?

The JJ Way ®

How has the JJ Way® model of prenatal care made a difference? The 2007, 2014, 2017 Study –evaluation results What is lacking in ‘Materno-toxic Areas’ and maternity healthcare? What do we need now?


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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Janice Banther, CCCE, CLD, CHBE, CIMI

Janice Banther has been a pioneer leader among birth professionals in advocating for pregnant women who are incarcerated. She is the Founder and Executive Director of Birth Behind Bars (BBB). BBB began providing childbirth and parenting classes and labor support services to inmates in 2001. Prior to 2001 Janice focused her childbirth work primarily with at risk mothers; homeless, addicted and abused. This body of work has earned Janice the highest certifications. She is a certified CAPPA Childbirth Educator, Labor Doula, Happiest Baby on the Block, Infant Massage Instructor, Trainer and Bereavement Counselor with RTS. BBB expanded its training of birth professionals to work with inmates in 2015 with the release of Birth Behind Bars Certification program; an online and manual based program equipping childbirth educators and birth professionals to work in a jail or prison environment in the United States and Internationally.

USA Janice Banther, CCCE, CLD, CHBE, CIMI
Abstract:

This presentation will cover the history and background of how the incarcerated pregnant woman experiences birth. And it will demonstrate the current trends in educating and equipping the inmate for a birth experience that will; reduce the need for medical intervention, increase bonding between new born and mother, prepare the inmate for parenting from jail or prison and reducing the likelihood that the mother will be reincarcerated.

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Presentations: 20  |  Hours / CE Credits: 19.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Began exploring her interests in Natural Healing Arts and Complementary Medicine as a Midwife after the home birth of her first child in 1993. In the state of Florida, she completed her Diploma of Midwifery and graduated in 1997 from the School of Complementary Medicine in Central FL. Tomasina has many credentials in ethno-medicinal sciences, herbology, botanical chemistry, health & mental wellness counseling, education and spiritual facilitation work. Tomasina apprenticed with meta-physical healers, physicians and several other multi-disciplinary specialists to complete an internship as a Complementary Medicine Practitioner, and later became a Holistic Health Practitioner and Master Herbalist. She remains committed to building within communities of African descent to enhance social justice for all concerned. Her skill set is unparalleled in diverse treatment options for the well being of Families, Mothers and Babies as she has delivered double and well over 1000 babies since 2012. ANS(Autonomic Nerve System) Therapy, Iridology, Kinesiology, MT (Muscle Testing) and NLP(Neuro Linguistic Programming) are just a few other healing arts Midwife Tomasina has acquired expert proficiency in serving Clients for over 20 years. Having briefly served on the NARM (North American Registry Midwives) board, she is familiar with the nuances and intricacies of corporate Midwifery work and is excited to serve as Vice President for MANA (Midwives Alliance of North America).



Abstract:

Our live discussion with our experts will touch on the "health state of the mind and its processes for women of childbearing age" (and other definitions of black maternal mental health). Our discussion will further look at stressors, trauma and influences that impact black maternal mental health and in bringing awareness to the masses. We will ask if there are solutions that can yield a more hopeful, positive outcome as we look into these disparities.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks

Cultural Humility in Birth

By Mars Lord, Doula, Birth Activist, Educator
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Mars Lord, Doula, Birth Activist, Educator

Award winning doula and birth activist Mars Lord has been a birth keeper for well over a decade. After attending the Paramana Doula course with Michel Odent and Lilliana Lammers, a spark was lit within her and the passion that she discovered for birth and supporting parents has fired her soul ever since. She has had the privilege of working with hundreds of families. A birth activist, with a desire to see the ‘colouring in of the landscape of birth’ and finding out the reasons for the maternal and neonatal morbidity rates amongst the BAME community, Mars created Abuela Doulas a doula preparation course primarily, but not exclusively, for women of colour. Her desire for reproductive justice led to the creation of the ‘Reproductive Justice Retreat’. Mars was recently recognised in the Mayor of London's Hidden Credits campaign and continues to speak out for cultural safety and reproductive justice.

UK Mars Lord, Doula, Birth Activist, Educator
Abstract:

There is an urgent need for all health care providers to be well versed in cultural humility and cultural safety during pregnancy and birth. This presentation will explore these concepts in the context of providing labour support, and provide a detailed look at what cultural humility is, why we should practice it and the consequences when we don’t, along with practical information about how to practice cultural humility and the beautiful changes that happen when we approach labour support with an open mind and heart and the intention to be aware of our own biases in order to provide culturally safe care.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Monika Mitra is the Nancy Lurie Marks Associate Professor of Disability Policy, and Director of the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Her research focuses on the health and wellbeing of people with disabilities and their families. She co-leads the Community Living Policy Center which is aimed at improving policies and practices that advance community living outcomes for people with disabilities and the National Research Center for Parents with Disabilities which is focused on addressing knowledge gaps regarding the needs of parents with diverse disabilities and their families. Dr. Mitra is co-editor-in-chief of the Disability and Health Journal. Prior to joining Brandeis, she was Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Abstract:

In the last ten years, an emerging body of evidence has documented the disparities in perinatal care, quality, and outcomes of women with disabilities. This presentation will provide an in-depth examination of the unmet needs and barriers to perinatal care among women with different disabilities. It will highlight disparities in pregnancy and birth outcomes among women with and without disabilities. It will also outline recommendations to women with disabilities who are considering pregnancy and examine the experiences and needs of health care practitioners in providing obstetric care to women with disabilities.
The findings for this presentation are informed by analyses of nationally representative surveys, population-based administrative data, and from interviews with disabled women and obstetric care clinicians from the United States. We will include findings on the perinatal health of women with physical disabilities, women who are deaf and hard of hearing, and women with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
This presentation will shed light on the unmet needs and barriers to care of women with disabilities during pregnancy and childbirth and emphasize the urgent need for policy and practice recommendations to improve perinatal care of women with disabilities.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Christine Morton is a medical sociologist at the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC) at Stanford University where she conducts research on maternal mortality and morbidity and helps translate the findings into maternal quality toolkits.

As a sociologist, Dr Morton seeks to explore the social meanings of maternal quality among all stakeholders. Her speaking and writing connects her to nursing, obstetric, midwifery, doula, public and social science audiences.

Her book, Birth Ambassadors: Doulas & the Re-emergence of Woman-Supported Childbirth in America, documents the history and experience of the doula role in US maternity care and is on the required reading list for DONA International.

She is a long time Lamaze board member and currently chairs a Lamaze Work Group, which aims to demonstrate the value of childbirth education. She is married to an internet sociologist and they have a son and daughter, ages 22 and 17, who were born safe and healthy thanks to great teamwork.


Abstract:

Maternal mortality and morbidity are rising, the cesarean rate just crept up and infant mortality rates are still too high in the United States. Black women are more likely to experience these outcomes than non-black women. This session will present U.S. trends and outline recent efforts to improve maternal quality of care. The triple aim of healthcare is quality, safety and satisfaction. As maternity leaders work to improve quality and safety, they still need to address the critical dimension of women’s satisfaction with their birth, whether that experience involved a severe complication or not. Standardizing responses in emergent or routine clinical situations is critical but so is the value of individualizing care. This means examining how emotional, experiential and relational aspects of maternity care affect outcomes, both long and short term. In this session, we will address the important, unasked question in maternity care today: What are the costs of not ‘caring’?

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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 15.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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United States Fayth M. Parks, PhD, Licensed Psychologist

Fayth M. Parks, PhD is an associate professor and licensed psychologist in the Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development at Georgia Southern University. Fayth is a counseling psychologist whose scholarship and research focuses on ways diverse cultures interpret mental health, healing, and illness recovery to prevent misdiagnosing as psychopathology culturally significant beliefs and practices that can facilitate personal strengths, positive emotions, and behavior change. She has published journal articles, essays, and book chapters on this topic as well as given numerous invited lectures, TEDx Talks, and workshops. In 2009, Fayth was appointed the David B. Larson Fellow in Health and Spirituality at The John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress. You can follow her on Twitter @FaythParks. And visit Fayth’s website for more cultural strength-based strategies for healthy wellbeing at www.faythparks.com

United States Fayth M. Parks, PhD, Licensed Psychologist
Abstract:

The complexity of postpartum depression and other pregnancy and postpartum mood disorders, including significant health disparities that have emerged from its disproportionate impact on marginalized communities, necessitates learning innovative ways to think critically about the role healing traditions play in a person's medical belief system. Employment of vernacular knowledge about the cause, prevention, and treatment of physical and mental illness along with conventional medicine is a form of medical pluralism where more than one system is in use. Cultural strengths derived from healing traditions can teach us varied helping and healing strategies. Four elements that form a framework for understanding how diverse cultures construct the healing experience will be highlighted. If we disregard healing traditions, we overlook the expressiveness of human behavior and cognitive styles that promote harmony of mind and body, family and community.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Monnica T. Williams is a board-certified licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor at the University of Connecticut in the Department of Psychological Sciences and Department of Psychiatry. She is also Clinical Director of the Behavioral Wellness Clinic, where she provides supervision and training to clinicians for empirically-supported treatments. Prior to her recent move to Connecticut, Dr. Williams served as the Director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Dr. Williams’ research focuses on African American mental health, culture, and psychopathology, and she has published over 80 scientific articles on these topics. Current projects include the assessment of race-based trauma, unacceptable thoughts in OCD, improving cultural competence in the delivery of mental health care services, and interventions to reduce racism. She also gives diversity trainings nationally for clinical psychology programs, scientific conferences, and community organizations.

Dr. Williams is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), having served as the diversity delegate from Kentucky for the APA State Leadership Conference for two consecutive years. She is also the African American SIG leader for Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), and she serves on the editorial board of The Behavior Therapist, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, and the Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the International OCD Foundation, and also serves as the co-chair of the Diversity Counsel. Her work has been featured in several major media outlets, including NPR and the New York Times.

Abstract:

This presentation will provide an overview of relevant cultural factors for African Americans and other stigmatized minority groups, with an emphasis on understanding race-based trauma and its impact on childbirth experiences. I will discuss various forms of racism that occur in medical settings that contribute to health disparities in people of color, including racial microaggressions. Constructs that cause and perpetuate race-based stress and trauma will be reviewed, including White privilege, stereotypes, and racial discrimination. I will describe the various facets of race-based trauma, including the experience of historical, cultural, community, and individual trauma, and how these may or may not fit into our current psychiatric nomenclature. I will provide examples of patient-provider interactions that are helpful versus harmful in the context of childbirth and women of color’s reproductive issues.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Sharon Storton, MA, MS, Reg. Psych.

Sharon Storton is an Alberta Registered Psychologist, and Canadian Registered Couple/Family Therapist, with a specialty in the support of women and families in the childbearing period. Sharon was one of the founders, a dozen years ago, of the still-active Internet-based peer-support forum, Solace for Mothers. Those years ago, few recognized the experience of trauma as it related to childbirth itself, the impact of abuse on women during the childbearing period, and the prevalence of health protocols that may lead to feelings of oppression and even depression in women and their partners.

Canada Sharon Storton, MA, MS, Reg. Psych.
Abstract:

Pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal year are unique time periods in a woman’s life, that impact her identity, agency, and her ability to transition to a new or expanded role as mother. Socially, childbirth is loaded with expectations of joy, fulfillment, and love. What happens when a woman’s experience is coloured by the overlay of autism spectrum disorder? Perhaps her sensory threshold, her ability to read social cues in unfamiliar environments, or her partner’s ability to support her are all challenged by the settings and protocols of perinatal care. In the postnatal period, attachment, infant needs, and physical healing can be intensified by autism-spectrum differences. This presentation will consider current research on ASD in childbearing women, the roles of her family and care team when ASD is present, and will offer suggestions provided by women themselves who balance ASD and family demands in this unique and critical life phase.

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Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.