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Hand Expression & Breast Massage Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Hand Expression & Breast Massage for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Hand Expression & Breast Massage online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Hand Expression & Breast Massage education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jane Morton has had a long, fulfilling career as a general pediatrician, She has also had a long-standing interest in breastfeeding, from understanding its clinical benefits to practical solutions for mothers having difficulty in providing breastmilk to their infants.  Over the years, she has conducted research on human milk and breastfeeding and has designed and implemented systems and policies to help breastfeeding mothers.  She produced award winning videos on this topic, including “Breastfeeding: A Guide to Getting Started”, “A Preemie Needs His Mother: Breastfeeding a Premature Baby” and “Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding”.  These have been translated and widely used in thousands of hospitals to train both staff and new mothers. As an executive board member of both the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding, she enjoyed working to enlarge the footprint of breastfeeding, both nationally and internationally.

For a 5 year period, she joined the neonatology clinical faculty at Stanford to develop the Breastfeeding Medicine Program.  In that position, she had the opportunity to design a nationally recognized educational program, conduct and publish original research on milk production and composition in mothers of very low birth weight infants, and publish a study with the AAP on the efficacy of a breastfeeding curriculum for physician residents in training. She was an advisor to the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, and was a key author of the toolkit “Nutritional Support for the Very Low Birth Weight Infant”. She co-authored the book Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU.  She has published extensively and presented her original research and educational workshops internationally. She continues to teach at Stanford where she is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Emerita.

USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Abstract:

The risk of early termination of breastfeeding typically relate to complications with a) attachment, b) breastmilk production, or c) the caloric intake of the infant. Simply put, A, B and C. Could hand expression taught in Labor and Delivery to every mother reduce early termination and the health, financial and emotional morbidity associated with breastfeeding complications in both low and high risk infants? This presentation will examine this question, focusing on the purpose of teaching early hand expression, the available science and the practice of integrating this technique into first hour care.

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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Maya Bolman, RN, BA, BSN, IBCLC

Maya Bolman was born and raised in Minsk, Belarus. She was certified as IBCLC in 2001 and currently works as a lactation consultant at Senders Pediatrics and Breastfeeding Medicine of Northeast Ohio.

Maya is well known internationally for her work promoting hand expression and breast massage to health professionals and parents. She recognizes that teaching these basic tools helps empower them to work through breastfeeding challenges including engorgement, plugged ducts, separation from the infant, and milk supply concerns. She has worked with Dr. Ann Witt to create an instructional video “The Basics of Breast Massage and Hand Expression” and conducts research on the effectiveness of Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation (TBML) both in the office and as a treatment at home for mothers.

USA Maya Bolman, RN, BA, BSN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Milk expression is common in the United States, but in the modern era it focuses on mechanical expression. In Russia, there has been a long tradition of hands-on techniques which encourages mothers to turn to specialists trained in hand expression and breast massage techniques to resolve breastfeeding complications including engorgement, plugged ducts and mastitis.. Two main principles of therapeutic breast massage in lactation include mobilization of fluid with massage toward the axillae to facilitate lymph circulation and alternating gentle massage and hand expression to facilitate milk removal. These techniques provide a simple, readily accessible method that can be easily taught to mothers and lactation consultants. The purpose of this presentation is to enhance knowledge of techniques for relieving discomfort caused by engorgement, plugged ducts, and mastitis in lactating women. The latest research findings on the role of therapeutic breast massage for breastfeeding mothers will be presented.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Barbara Wilson-Clay became a La Leche League Leader in 1982. She certified as an IBCLC and entered private practice in Austin, Texas in 1987. Barbara was named a Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association in 2008. She recently retired from her practice, which specialized in difficult breastfeeding situations. With a client load of 400-450 visits yearly, Barbara garnered a wealth of clinical and counseling experience and a trove of clinical teaching photos. In partnership with Kay Hoover, she created The Breastfeeding Atlas, which was translated into Chinese in 2019 by Fudan University Press. A Korean translation will be published in September 2020.

Barbara has been a citizen advocate for breastfeeding in the Texas legislature and helped pass a landmark law protecting breastfeeding rights. She is one of the co-founders of the non-profit Mothers Milk Bank at Austin, and retired as Vice President of the Board of Directors in 2010. She continues to serve on the Advisory Board. Barbara's research and commentaries have appeared in the Journal of Human Lactation, Archives of Disease in Childhood, the International Breastfeeding Journal, and others. She has served on various editorial review boards and contributed chapters to several lactation textbooks.

Abstract:

Pioneer researchers, clinicians, and breastfeeding advocates laid the foundations for modern lactation science. Many of their names are now forgotten, although they sounded the alarm about the risks of bottle feeding early in the last century and deplored the trend away from breastfeeding. Their dedication contributed to the development of the WHO Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in 1981, and their research contributed to the scientific basis for today's clinical practices. Thanks to advances in both science and technology we are now able to help many more mothers nurse their babies. However, enormous economic disparities exist between communities, and access to care and equipment varies widely. Technologies that we depend upon to support breastfeeding are unavailable in many areas. Even in normally secure communities, large footprint natural disasters, wars, refugee crises and unforeseen events can disrupt lives. However, no matter the circumstances mothers continue to give birth and newborns must receive adequate early immunological protection, warmth, and nutrition if they are to survive. Therefore, it is important to look back at some of the low tech solutions of the past and preserve this knowledge in our tool kits so that we know how to protect breastfeeding when the lights go off.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Maya Bolman, RN, BA, BSN, IBCLC

Maya Bolman was born and raised in Minsk, Belarus. She was certified as IBCLC in 2001 and currently works as a lactation consultant at Senders Pediatrics and Breastfeeding Medicine of Northeast Ohio.

Maya is well known internationally for her work promoting hand expression and breast massage to health professionals and parents. She recognizes that teaching these basic tools helps empower them to work through breastfeeding challenges including engorgement, plugged ducts, separation from the infant, and milk supply concerns. She has worked with Dr. Ann Witt to create an instructional video “The Basics of Breast Massage and Hand Expression” and conducts research on the effectiveness of Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation (TBML) both in the office and as a treatment at home for mothers.

USA Maya Bolman, RN, BA, BSN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Breast pain is one of the major causes of weaning. The likelihood of weaning increases the longer pain persists. Engorgement, plugged ducts, and mastitis are commonly associated with acute breast pain. Description of desired/achievable state: Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation (TBML) is one of the important measures to resolve pain quickly.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Almereau Prollius, MBChB, MMED (O&G), FCOG (SA), FRCSC

Naida Hawkins is a Registered Nurse and Lactation consultant in North Battleford, Saskatchewan. She is a passionate registered nurse who has cared for breastfeeding families for 14 years.

Almereau Prollius is an Obstetrician and Gynecologist in Saskatoon, SK. Together with Naida they have a special interest in strategies to promote successful breast feeding and are advocates of prenatal hand expression. They work as part of an interdisciplinary team supporting families to have an easier time starting and continuing breastfeeding.

More Milk Sooner is their program which supports and promotes hand expression in the antenatal and early postpartum period. Based out of Saskatoon and North Battleford in Saskatchewan, they hope to empower patients and care providers to increase successful breastfeeding. They are delighted to be sharing their journey with you. They are actively involved in research reviewing the outcomes of the implementation of the prenatal hand expression education strategy.

Canada Almereau Prollius, MBChB, MMED (O&G), FCOG (SA), FRCSC
Abstract:

Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life is currently recommended by numerous health authorities including the World Health Organization and UNICEF, and should be encouraged and supported prenatally, perinatally and postpartum. Despite these recommendations, the rate of sustained breastfeeding to six months of life remain low. Prenatal hand expression (PHE) is a method used to assist with colostrum collection beginning near term pregnancy. This technique is low-cost and easy to teach and learn. It has been shown to reduce problems with milk stasis, mastitis and breast engorgement by mobilizing colostrum and breastmilk. Learn more about how this technique can improve breastfeeding exclusivity and duration and how to implement it in your practice.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.