GOLD Learning Speakers

USA

Ellen Chetwynd, PHD, MPH, RN, BSN, IBCLC

  • Speaker Type: ABM Conference 2016
  • Country: USA
Biography:

Ellen is a breastfeeding researcher and lactation consultant working on postdoctoral research at North Carolina State University after completing her doctoral work at UNC in Maternal/Child Health and Epidemiology. Her career in perinatal health has included work as a Program Director, Lactation Consultant, and Perinatal Nurse. She founded two lactation consultant practices, one in a Family Medicine service, and the second in an out of hospital birth center, where she maintains an active practice. Her specialty is working with maternal pain through assessment and treatment of infant physiology. Her goal is to bring her model to communities with limited existing lactation support. She co-directs her professional organization, and works with a legislative committee on reimbursement of lactation services by Medicaid. Her breastfeeding research includes pain with breastfeeding, breast milk induction, the profession of lactation consulting, and metabolic health and breastfeeding. Today’s presentation is from her dissertation.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Cumulative Lactation and Middle Aged Onset of Hypertesnsion in African American women
Hypertension affects nearly one of three women in the United States. Breastfeeding leads to metabolic changes that could reduce risks of hypertension. Hypertension disproportionately affects black women, but rates of breastfeeding lag behind the general population. In the Black Women’s Health Study (N = 59,001), we conducted a nested case control analysis using unconditional logistic regression to estimate the association between breastfeeding and incident hypertension at ages 40-65. Controls were frequency matched 2:1 to 12,513 hypertensive cases by age and questionnaire cycle. Overall, there was little evidence of association between ever-breastfeeding and incident hypertension (Odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.02). However, age modified the relationship (P = 0.02): breastfeeding was associated with reduced risk of hypertension at ages 40-49 (Odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) but not older ages. Our results suggest long-duration breastfeeding may reduce incident hypertension in middle age.
Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Cumulative Lactation and Middle Aged Onset of Hypertesnsion in African American women
Hypertension affects nearly one of three women in the United States. Breastfeeding leads to metabolic changes that could reduce risks of hypertension. Hypertension disproportionately affects black women, but rates of breastfeeding lag behind the general population. In the Black Women’s Health Study (N = 59,001), we conducted a nested case control analysis using unconditional logistic regression to estimate the association between breastfeeding and incident hypertension at ages 40-65. Controls were frequency matched 2:1 to 12,513 hypertensive cases by age and questionnaire cycle. Overall, there was little evidence of association between ever-breastfeeding and incident hypertension (Odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.02). However, age modified the relationship (P = 0.02): breastfeeding was associated with reduced risk of hypertension at ages 40-49 (Odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) but not older ages. Our results suggest long-duration breastfeeding may reduce incident hypertension in middle age.
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation