GOLD Learning Speakers

USA

Ellen Chetwynd, PhD, MPH, BSN, IBCLC

  • Speaker Type: ABM Conference 2016, Tongue-Tie Symposium 2019
  • Country: USA
Biography:

Ellen Chetwynd PhD MPH RN BSN IBCLC is a breastfeeding researcher, lactation consultant, and advocate. Her goal is to provide excellent care that is innovative and effective. Her clinical care is equally informed by, and leads to, her research and collaborations with fellow scientists. She is an advocate of breastfeeding families of all shapes, as well as the providers who care for them. Through her work as Chair of the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition she has contributed to the statewide work to provide Medicaid reimbursement in North Carolina, successfully funded a project to support clinics seeking to become breastfeeding friendly and increase access to equitable support of breastfeeding, implemented a statewide breastfeeding summit, and created an interactive statewide resource listing for breastfeeding resources at the county level. In her lactation consulting work, she is sought out by parents and clinicians for her work with difficult cases of pain and dysfunctional infant suck. She is a prolific writer, and her research and publications cover topics including breastfeeding and metabolic health, reimbursement for lactation consulting, LGBTQI+ families, and breastfeeding research methodology. She recently created and co-taught a full day workshop on breastfeeding research methods, and gets fired up about the numbers behind what we do to support families. At Next Level Lactation LLC, she and her partners provide advanced lactation educational opportunities.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Cumulative Lactation and Middle Aged Onset of Hypertesnsion in African American women
Hypertension affects nearly one of three women in the United States. Breastfeeding leads to metabolic changes that could reduce risks of hypertension. Hypertension disproportionately affects black women, but rates of breastfeeding lag behind the general population. In the Black Women’s Health Study (N = 59,001), we conducted a nested case control analysis using unconditional logistic regression to estimate the association between breastfeeding and incident hypertension at ages 40-65. Controls were frequency matched 2:1 to 12,513 hypertensive cases by age and questionnaire cycle. Overall, there was little evidence of association between ever-breastfeeding and incident hypertension (Odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.02). However, age modified the relationship (P = 0.02): breastfeeding was associated with reduced risk of hypertension at ages 40-49 (Odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) but not older ages. Our results suggest long-duration breastfeeding may reduce incident hypertension in middle age.
Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Cumulative Lactation and Middle Aged Onset of Hypertesnsion in African American women
Hypertension affects nearly one of three women in the United States. Breastfeeding leads to metabolic changes that could reduce risks of hypertension. Hypertension disproportionately affects black women, but rates of breastfeeding lag behind the general population. In the Black Women’s Health Study (N = 59,001), we conducted a nested case control analysis using unconditional logistic regression to estimate the association between breastfeeding and incident hypertension at ages 40-65. Controls were frequency matched 2:1 to 12,513 hypertensive cases by age and questionnaire cycle. Overall, there was little evidence of association between ever-breastfeeding and incident hypertension (Odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.02). However, age modified the relationship (P = 0.02): breastfeeding was associated with reduced risk of hypertension at ages 40-49 (Odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) but not older ages. Our results suggest long-duration breastfeeding may reduce incident hypertension in middle age.
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
The Compensatory Mechanics of Suck for Babies with Oral Tethering: How to Identify and Treat after Revision
Babies with oral tethering don't have access to the full range of motion needed to create negative pressure at the back of their mouths so they can draw milk out of the effectively and painlessly. We can all assess the latch, but what is happening with the tongue, the breast and nipple, and the other muscles involved in the mechanics of suck after the baby’s mouth closes over the breast? How do we identify compensatory mechanisms convince babies to change them with the broader mobility they have after frenotomy? This presentation will teach participants how to visualize/experience normal infant suck. Compensatory suck mechanisms are the techniques that infants use during feeding when they don’t have access to adequate movement in their tongue and floor of their mouth. Infants are creative, and the strategies they develop are varied. Participants will learn how to identify and categorize compensatory mechanisms and use clinical skills to differentiate and assess muscle tension related to overuse and suck mechanics at the breast. A unique set of clinical techniques that can be used by the lactation consultant and taught to the mother addressing each category of compensatory suck mechanics will be introduced and illustrated through case studies.
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits:  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits:  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: (details)  |  Categories: Tongue-tie & Structure