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Family-Centered Care Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Family-Centered Care for NEONATOLOGY professional training. These Family-Centered Care online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Family-Centered Care education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, MSW

Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, ACSW, has been working in maternal and child health for over 30 years as an educator, researcher, advocate, and writer. She is the immediate past president of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) and the founding director of Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, which provides safe donor milk to hospitals and families throughout the northeastern US. An expert on access to perinatal health care and policies that support breastfeeding, she has been a consultant to the Centers for Disease Control (on a panel that created “The CDC Guide to Breastfeeding Interventions”), to the United States Breastfeeding Committee (developing an issue paper addressed to CEOs and legislators on breastfeeding and the workplace), and to the March of Dimes (developing educational material for women and families who are medically and socially vulnerable to high-risk pregnancy). She also developed a curriculum for hospital personnel about combining breastfeeding with their work. She reviews articles submitted to the Journal of Human Lactation, Breastfeeding Medicine, and other publications related to breastfeeding, milk banking, and access to perinatal child care. As Executive Director of Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, she is thoroughly versed in the technical, procedural, and ethical aspects of milk banking. She often speaks at professional conferences, hospital staff trainings, and grand rounds about milk banking and breastfeeding policies.

United States Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, MSW
Abstract:

This talk uses research literature and hospital policies and programs to explore ways for families of babies in the NICU to be meaningful and active members of the NICU care team. We will look at a global snapshot of prematurity; define what a team is and who is on the NICU care team; and discuss the short- and long-term goals of the NICU care team, as well as many tools and strategies that team members and the team as a whole have at their disposal to reach those goals. Can be adapted for US or global audiences.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Kara Wahlin is a licensed marriage and family therapist and art therapist who resides in the Coachella Valley of southern California. After going through the preterm birth of her twin sons William and Elliott, and the subsequent loss of William, Kara made the promise to dedicate her clinical work to helping other families coping with the trauma and loss often wrought by the NICU experience. She developed the website NICU Healing in order to provide free information, couples and individual therapy, and online support to NICU families. Kara uses strengths-based, neuroloscientifically-informed and creative practices to empower her clients to picking up the pieces of their lives and moving forward with their new life stories. She speaks frequently at conferences discussing best clinical practices, and writes for her own as well as other blogs about new ways of coping with mental health issues that come up after traumatic experiences. In her free time, Kara and her son Elliott are art machines and expert hikers, and also spend their time at home with their menagerie of small animals.

Abstract:

Evidence has shown that attachment between a primary caregiver and their preterm infant can change the neurodevelopmental outcomes for the infant later in life. Attachment can be seen as a living organism between parent/caregiver and child, and with encouraged development and growth, the attachment relationship can have profound effects, even in the context of the most difficult of circumstances and medical diagnoses. The more NICU caregivers know how to encourage attachment, the likelier a family system will need less medical/psychological intervention after discharge from the hospital.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Finland Anna Axelin, RN, PhD, Associate Professor

Anna Axelin’s academic career has included conducting quantitative and qualitative research on maternity and neonatal care in multidisciplinary and international research groups. In the Academic year 2011-2012, she joined the faculty of Department of Family Health Care Nursing in University of California San Francisco for her post-doctoral research. Since 2018, she was appointed as an associated researcher in the Department of International Maternal and Child Health at University of Uppsala in Sweden. In addition to the academic career, she has ten-year working experience as a NICU nurse.
She is leading the Health in Early Life and Parenthood (HELP) research group which aims to promote health and welfare in the early stages of life. Her special research interest is how to keep parents and sick newborns together throughout the infant hospital stay and strengthen their relationship already during pregnancy. Anna Axelin’s other research interests include pain and sleep in neonates, and the implementation of evidence-based practice in maternity and neonatal care with the help information technology.

Finland Anna Axelin, RN, PhD, Associate Professor
Abstract:

Infants should not be separated from their parents. Parent-infant closeness is vital for the development of parent-infant relationship and consequently for parental well-being and optimal infant development. However, every year, due to medical care or hospital routines detrimental separation affects millions of infants. This presentation explores parents’ and staff’s perceptions of infant-parent closeness and separation in maternity care, delivery ward and neonatal intensive care environment. Based on these experiences, barriers (e.g. care routines and resources) and facilitators (e.g. patient centered communication skills, parent autonomy, single family rooms and couplet care) for closeness will be examined and potential strategies to facilitate parent-infant closeness in neonatal care are discussed.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Jacqueline McGrath, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

Dr. Jacqueline McGrath is a Professor and Vice Dean for Faculty Excellence at the UTH San Antonio, School of Nursing. Research foci include integration of family-centered and developmentally supportive caregiving with premature infants and their families in the NICU. More specifically, her work has focused on the biobehavioral outcomes of increasing parent engagement on both parents and the infant. Increasing parent engagement is believed to be a mechanism for increasing parent self-management skills after infant discharge and ultimately enhancing infant long-term development. She has also conducted studies related to preterm infants’ oral feeding readiness and preterm infant touch and massage (parent provided). Based on her research, she developed the NICU-PLAY program for parents and their hospitalized preterm infants. She has published more than 150 peer-reviewed articles. Dr. McGrath is the Co-Editor for Advances in Neonatal Care the journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. In 2007, Dr. McGrath became a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. She received her BSN from the University of Akron; MSN from Kent State University in parent-child nursing; both a post-master’s certificate as a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.

United States Jacqueline McGrath, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN
Abstract:

Parents are essential to infant brain development; high risk birth with admission to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) only increases their vital role. Current evidence increasingly provides direction for how best to fully engage parents through increased opportunities for both physical and emotional closeness enhancing parent-infant interactions and participation in NICU caregiving activities. Early brain development is highly affected by early experiences particularly those with parents. Parent engagement is defined as a dynamic process focused on enhancing and supporting the parent-infant experience; specifically enhancing the acquisition of skills for problem-solving and provision of appropriate infant care based on the unique infant needs. Enhancing parent engagement is one means of decreasing what has been recently documented as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often experienced by parents who must traverse the chaotic NICU environment while supporting their high-risk infant. Concurrently, the unique needs of the infant’s developing brain demands that caregiving by parent and health providers be neuroprotective matching the “expectations” for experiences that “nurture” their development.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Jill Bergman qualified from University of Cape Town, South Africa in 1983 with a degree and post graduate teachers diploma. She has taught in Zimbabwe and South Africa and lectured at a teachers training college.

She has supported her husband Dr Nils Bergman in Kangaroo Mother Care since he started in 1988, and in a full-time capacity since 2000. She has made 4 films and written a book- Hold Your Prem- for parents of premature babies, all making the neuroscience that Nils teaches applicable in practice and translating care into non-technical language.. She has a passion for supporting mothers in labour as a doula and as a kangaroula speaking for the needs of newborns, empowering mums and babies with early bonding and breastfeeding. She trains nursing staff and hospitals in the practicalities of skin to skin contact, and developmental care. She and Nils have three super youngsters,two just finished university.

Abstract:

New neuroscience evidence shows how vital it is to put the preterm baby onto mother’s chest. This talk empowers the NICU staff to empower the parents with information and practical skills to best support their sensitive preterm baby’s development.

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Presentations: 4  |  Hours / CE Credits: 4  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Available in: Preterm Lecture Pack
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Minesh Khashu, M.B.B.S, MD, FRCPCH, FRSA

Prof. (Dr.) Minesh Khashu M.B.B.S, MD, FRCPCH, FRSA, Q Fellow ( Health Foundation & NHS Improvement), Fellow England Centre for Practice Development Consultant Neonatologist, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust & Prof. of Perinatal Health, Bournemouth University. Clinical Director, Maternity & Neonatal Care, Regional Strategic Clinical Network, NHS England, Wessex Dr. Khashu has received national and international recognition for his work especially in Quality Improvement, Necrotizing Enterocolitis and improving fathers experiences of neonatal care. Dr. Khashu is a clinical leader reimagining healthcare with a focus on system wide transformation, continuous Quality Improvement and Patient Centred Care. He has experience of clinical management and leadership at hospital, regional and national level including strategic change, system redesign, large scale quality improvement and development of national guidance and multi stakeholder collaboration. He has developed the DadPad Neonatal, a resource to support dads whose babies have been admitted to neonatal units. This has been very well received by parents, families, healthcare professionals and charities and nominated for multiple national awards. https://thedadpad.co.uk/neonatal/ He has also set up SIGNEC (special interest group for NEC) in the U.K. and developed a website for parents/families and health professiaonals which has been much appreciated. https://signec.org/ He convenes International Conferences on NEC in London regularly.

UK Minesh Khashu, M.B.B.S, MD, FRCPCH, FRSA
Abstract:

The presentation will cover current evidence of suboptimal practice in terms of fathers expereinces within maternity and neonatal services, our specific recommendations to improve practice and my development of DadPad Neonatal as a specific resource to improve experiences of fathers.
We have reviewed the literature on engaging fathers in neonatal units, with the aim of making recommendations for improving experience of fathers as well as health outcomes in neonatal practice. Fathers typically describe the opportunity to bond with their babies in glowing terms of gratitude, happiness and love. These experiences are underpinned by hormonal and neurobiological changes. We find that engagement with fathers remains sub-optimal. Fathers, also, are subject to different social expectations from mothers, which shapes how they respond to the situation and how neonatal staff treats them.
We have put forth 3 core principles and 12 practical recommendations for neonatal teams to focus on.


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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Dr. Raylene Philips, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

After raising three children as a stay-at-home mother, Dr. Phillips received a Masters degree in Developmental Psychology, became NIDCAP certified as an Infant Developmental Specialist, and then attended medical school at University of California, Davis, graduating in 2004. She completed her pediatric residency and neonatology fellowship at Loma Linda University Children's Hospital in Loma Linda, CA and is currently an attending neonatologist in the NICU at the same hospital as well as Co-Medical Director of Newborn Nursery at Loma Linda University Medical Center-Murrieta. Dr. Phillips is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and is a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. She is the immediate past president of the National Perinatal Association. Her primary areas of interest are mother-infant attachment, breastfeeding education and support, and Family-Centered Neuroprotective Care of premature infants in the NICU.

USA Dr. Raylene Philips, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP
Abstract:

There is ample evidence that Family-Centered Developmental Care in the NICU results in improved neonatal and neurodevelopmental outcomes, increased family satisfaction and even enhanced employee satisfaction once the culture change has been accomplished. However, implementing the known principles of Family-Centered Developmental Care in the NICU to create those culture changes has long been a challenge. Several models of implementing developmental care have been tried and met with varying challenges and degrees of success. The Seven Neuroprotective Core Measures of Family-Centered Developmental Care in the Neonatal Integrative Developmental Care Model has been trialed in our NICU for the past three years and has proven to be effective as a tool to bring about staff buy-in and engagement in the process of implementing Family-Centered Developmental Care principles into the culture of our NICU.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Natalia Varela is a professor at the Externado University of Colombia. She directs the family and children research department. Dr. Natalia´s research experience on child development involved an interdisciplinary approach that enabled her to acquire tools working on an array of projects involving at-risk children and families around the world (Colombia, Canada, India, Vietnam, Indonesia, Burundi). Having worked with United Nations agencies and international NGOs, Dr. Natalia has gained expertise in academic research, as well as international development. Dr. Natalia works closely with the Kangaroo Foundation in Colombia on interesting research about premature birth and fatherhood. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from Laval University in Canada.

Abstract:

Over the past decades, researchers have established the importance of the father on child development. Research shows that when fathers are involved, child development is affected. Children show better cognitive skills, fewer aggressive interactions, and better performance in school. Research shows that the earlier the involvement, the better. Nonetheless, when the baby is born premature, this interaction is usually delayed as life is in danger and, the baby is placed in the NICU. Premature birth (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) is a sudden and overwhelming event for the whole family. Parents of premature babies experience high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. Most studies and interventions are focused on babies and mothers, neglecting fathers. The Kangaroo mother care method in which the baby must be placed in skin-to-skin position as long and much as possible has transformed not only the NICU practices but also the involvement of family members (especially fathers) in the care of premature babies. We will explore the experiences and impact of skin to skin contact on fathers in different countries and cultures.

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Presentations: 12  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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USA Jodi Dolezel, BSN, RNC-NICU

Jodi is registered nurse with a strong passion for preemies, developmental care in the NICU, parent teaching, and education. When not at the bedside, Jodi is hard at work offering support and lending a virtual hand to parents of NICU babies through her organization Peekaboo ICU. Jodi is the president/CEO as well as a Family Support Specialist that heads up the organization’s Journey Bead Program- offering a tangible way to track, document, and celebrate milestones in the NICU. Jodi attended college in Ontario Canada where she completed her nursing degree. After college, Jodi earned a number of certification in neonatal nursing including her RNC-NIC, Developmental Care Specialist certification, and an Advanced Certification in Neonatal nursing while attending BCIT’s Bachelor of Science in Neonatal Nursing degree program. Jodi is currently working towards her Masters of Science in Nursing-Care Coordination degree through Capella University.

USA Jodi Dolezel, BSN, RNC-NICU
Abstract:

Storytelling is the foundation of the human experience and can be an extraordinarily powerful tool used to connect families and healthcare providers in the neonatal intensive care. The NICU is a fast-paced, high stress environment so it’s easy to lose site of the story, but it is the story that can make a difference, not only to the families you serve, but to you as well. It is through storytelling that a compassionate, real approach to care and medicine will bring change to the NICU experience, increase patient satisfaction, and decrease burnout and compassion fatigue. In this presentation you will learn how to develop more empathetic relationships with families on the basis of a deeper understanding of their human experience. Follow Jodi as she explores the principles of storytelling, evaluates the use of narrative medicine in NICU education, and teaches ground breaking strategies to recreate a positive and profound NICU experience through the power of human connections.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1.25  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.