Categories


-
  • Affordable Educational Credits
  • Watch At Your Convenience
  • Worldwide Speakers
  • Captivating Topics
  • Peer Interactions

Postpartum Depression Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Postpartum Depression for PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH professional training. These Postpartum Depression online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Postpartum Depression education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Dr. Sheehan Fisher is an Assistant Professor and clinical psychologist at Northwestern University. His research career focuses on the effects of perinatal and subsequent parental mental health on infant/child health outcomes, with a specialization in the emerging field of father mental health. More specifically, he examines: 1) the biopsychosocial risk factors for parental psychopathology, 2) the impact of parental psychopathology on parenting behaviors and the family environment, and 3) the combined effect of the family environment on infant/child medical and emotional health outcomes. His aim is to reconceptualize parental mental health research to integrally involve both mothers and fathers to differentiate the etiology, course, and potential interactivity of paternal and maternal mental health and, in turn, the longitudinal associations with child medical and mental health. Dr. Fisher’s research dovetails with his perinatal clinical practice, including being the clinical director of the Fathers’ Mental Health Specialty Clinic. Ultimately, the goal is for his research plan is to optimize the health and effectiveness of the parental team to positively influence the child health trajectory starting from infancy.

Abstract:

Maternal and paternal depression rates are elevated during the perinatal period compared to the normal population. Historically, fathers were excluded from perinatal mental health research but there is strong evidence that fathers have their own unique experiences that are more recently being considered within research. Mothers and fathers express and report depressive symptoms differently, which may influence detection of depression. Both parents’ mental health has an impact on parenting behaviors and the family functioning, which ultimately have an impact on child health. Perinatal clinical treatment would benefit from a comprehensive examination of the family dynamic to best provide treatment of perinatal depression and improve child health. Fathers can be utilized as an asset to mothers and clinicians to support maternal mental health. Future research is needed to optimize clinical treatment of perinatal mental illness that accounts for the full family dynamic.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE

Dianne Cassidy is a Lactation Consultant in Rochester, New York with Advanced Lactation Certification.  Dianne works in Private Practice, and in a busy Pediatrician office supporting mothers and babies. She also teaches prenatal breastfeeding and childbirth in the hospital setting.  In the fall of 2013, Dianne completed her MA in Health and Wellness/Lactation.  She is dedicated to serving mothers and babies, and has the unique ability to identify with the needs and concerns of new mothers.  Dianne has worked extensively with women who have survived trauma, babies struggling with tongue tie, birth trauma, milk supply issues, attachment, identifying latch problems, returning to work and breastfeeding multiples.

Dianne has 3 biological children, including twins, 3 step children and a wonderful husband.  Dianne is an author and public speaker and enjoys teaching caregivers how to support new families through breastfeeding struggles.

USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Abstract:

It is well known that breastfeeding is beneficial to both mother and baby. What happens if breastfeeding is not well established? Researchers are looking closer to postpartum mood disorders and what influence breastfeeding may have in a new mother's psychological well being.

Postpartum depression has been linked to low breastfeeding rates, as well as lower duration rates. Postpartum depression falls under the diagnosis of "major depressive disorder with peripartum onset during pregnancy or in the weeks following delivery" (Bascom & Napolitano, 2015). It has been estimated that postpartum mood disorders, strike an estimated 10-20% of new mothers (Bascom & Napolitano, 2015). However, it has been argued that this number reflects only those women who have sought help for their symptoms. The probability that more women are affected by postpartum mood disorders is high.

Postpartum mood disorders adversely affect not only the health of the mother, but also the relationship with her partner, interaction with her newborn and infant growth (Yusuff, Tang, Binns, Lee, 2015). There are several predictors that can help determine if a woman is at risk for postpartum mood disorders, including mental health history, social status, and labor and delivery. Researchers have found that when more medical interventions were used during labor, the higher the depressive symptoms for the mother. This presentation will aid personnel working with new families to be aware of the signs and syptoms of postpartum mood disorders and how to preserve the breastfeeding relationship.


View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 26  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
United States Nancy Byatt, DO, MS, MBA, FAPM

Dr. Byatt is a perinatal psychiatrist focused on improving health care systems to promote maternal mental health. She is an Associate Professor at UMass Medical School in the Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Her research focuses on developing innovative ways to improve the implementation and adoption of evidence-based depression treatment for pregnant and postpartum women. She has federal funding to test interventions to help women access and engage in perinatal depression treatment in obstetric settings. Her academic achievements have led to numerous peer-reviewed publications and national awards. She is also the Founding and Statewide Medical Director of MCPAP for Moms, a statewide program that addresses perinatal depression in Massachusetts by providing mental health consultation and care coordination for medical providers serving pregnant and postpartum women.

United States Nancy Byatt, DO, MS, MBA, FAPM
Abstract:

Perinatal depression - depression that occurs during pregnancy or in the year after birth - can have far-reaching, harmful effects for all family members. Fathers and adoptive families can also experience perinatal depression. Birth outcomes can be adversely affected by depression in pregnancy, and postpartum depression can have a long-term impact on child outcomes. This workshop will outline: 1) prevalence of perinatal depression and risk factors; 2) impact on birth and child outcomes; 3) evidence-based practices for detecting, assess and manage perinatal depression; 4) and how the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Program (MCPAP) for Moms can help improve outcomes for babies, children, and families.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Dr. Kimberly Thompson is a licensed psychologist in Texas. She works with people across the life span, but the majority of her clinical work centers around the special concerns of women and children.
Dr. Thompson is a published researcher, author, and teacher. She teaches in the Infant & Early Childhood Development Ph.D. program, Fielding Graduate University, and has recently authored “Perfect Mothers Get Depressed,” a book on the cognitive and relational roots of postpartum depression.
Dr. Thompson has been married to Dr. Charles D. Thompson, an obstetrician-gynecologist, since 1985. The two Drs. Thompson have four children and one grandchild.

Abstract:

We will explore how dysfunctional thought patterns and habitual ways of being in relationships, based on life experiences, contribute to a woman’s approach to motherhood and the development of postpartum depression.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Psychological Trauma and was Founding Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, a position she held for 11 years. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of APA’s Publications and Communications Board.

Abstract:

A number of recent studies have raised questions about the way we understand depression in new mothers. For example, what is the role of depression in breastfeeding cessation and does mothers’ prenatal intention to breastfeed make a difference? Researchers have also found that epidurals lower the risk of depression, but the sample sizes are often small. Finally, a concerning trend has emerged regarding the link between depression, PTSD, and preterm birth. Women with depression or PTSD are at increased risk for preterm birth. The World Health Organization has recently identified preterm birth as the single greatest cause of infant mortality worldwide. These findings also have important implications for racial/ethnic disparities in both preterm birth and infant mortality. This presentation will summarize and synthesize these recent studies and present new findings from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue that address the link between birth interventions and depression in mothers.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.