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History of Trauma Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for History of Trauma for PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH professional training. These History of Trauma online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This History of Trauma education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Desirée is a perinatal psychotherapist, trained birth doula, Reiki practitioner, and owner of Motherland Community helping women decipher the funk of motherhood through her practice in Baltimore, MD. A mother of 2 boys, Desirée ignited her passion for perinatal mental health after experiencing undiagnosed postpartum depression and OCD. Using her own experience and compassion in hopes to heal others, Desirée completed training as a birth doula in 2014 and the Postpartum Support International’s Components of Care Training on PMADs in 2015. Since then, she has immersed her free time in PMAD (Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder) awareness. Additionally, she serves as a Maryland co-coordinator for PSI (Postpartum Support International), co-founder of the Perinatal Mental Health Alliance for Women of Color and her practice is a Perinatal Safe Spot through the National Perinatal Taskforce. Desirée’s philosophy is ‘every woman should be nurtured and cared for during her transition to motherhood. It is a rite of passage that has no manual, only the virtue of patience, sacrifice and sense of community that is necessary to hold space for a woman on the other side of birth.

Abstract:

African-American mothers experience birth and perinatal complications at a disproportionate rate. Thirty-eight percent of new mothers of color experience perinatal emotional complications like depression and anxiety. Women of color experience these complications at twice the rate of white women. Sixty percent of women of color do not receive treatment or support services for perinatal emotional complications. Reasons for this include lack of insurance coverage, social and cultural stigma, logistical barriers to services and lack of culturally appropriate care. This presentation will give a brief overview of racial trauma and its effects on perinatal outcomes for mothers of color, specifically African-American mothers, a template for a trauma-informed approach and examples of trauma-informed models of care to prevent negative outcomes.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Psychological Trauma and was Founding Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, a position she held for 11 years. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of APA’s Publications and Communications Board.

Abstract:

We do not live in a perfect world. Many new mothers have experienced abuse and adversity as children. They often wonder whether they will perpetuate the cycle of violence that they have experienced. They may also have a history of depression and wonder whether this has harmed their children. Fortunately, we can offer new mothers hope. Recent studies have found that breastfeeding helps mothers mother—even when there is a history of abuse. It not about the milk; it’s the physical act of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding improves maternal sleep, lowers the risk of depression, lessens anger and irritability, and even attenuates the negative effects of past sexual assault. Breastfeeding offers mothers a chance to do things differently—to be a different kind of parent. When it comes to overcoming adversity, breastfeeding makes all the difference.

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Natashia Conner is a graduate in Health and a Lactation Consultant at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. She is a member of Black Breastfeeding Research, Education, Awareness, & Support Team, Southwest Ohio Breastfeeding Coalition, and Trinity Mother & Baby Outreach. She became an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in 2015 and has worked with numerous mothers and infants supporting them on their breastfeeding journeys. As a graduate, she is heavily involved in research. Her research interests are: Investigations to improve infant mortality among minority and vulnerable population; Attest racial disparities to eliminate health care biases that systematically oppress breastfeeding equity. In the local community, she has volunteered and served as content expert for the Annual Black Family Reunion, NAACP Annual Conference, First Ladies Health Day. She is a breastfeeding advocate, peer, and a breastfeeding mother

Abstract:

During slavery, Black women were used as wet nurses. Black infants were often denied the benefits of breastfeeding. Forced care in the form of Mammy- Black nannies took the place of wet nurses. After the Civil War, infant formula became the norm. Following the Post-Civil War Act more attention has been given to Post-Traumatic Slave Syndrome and its implication on poor health outcomes.

In the U.S. SIDS is the leading contributing factors of infant mortality which is now 5.8 infant deaths per 1000 live births. Ohio is at 6.8/1000, and within Hamilton County 9.3/1000. Nationally Black babies are more likely to die before their first birthday. In Hamilton county Blacks represent 16.3% of infant death, while Whites represent 5.9%. The lack of breastfeeding is one of the leading risk factors associated with SIDS.
Strategies for prevention include increasing culturally appropriate support, access to breastfeeding education, and addressing racism and inequity in health care.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.