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Birth Practices & Breastfeeding Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Birth Practices & Breastfeeding for PREGNANCY, LABOUR & CHILDBIRTH professional training. These Birth Practices & Breastfeeding online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Birth Practices & Breastfeeding education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC

Jo Gilpin is a Registered Nurse, Midwife and has worked for many years as a Child Health Nurse with the Child and Family Health Service in South Australia (CaFHS). During this time she completed a Graduate Diploma in Health Counselling. She also studied Infant Mental Health at the University of South Australia. She became an IBCLC in 1996.
Her passion throughout has been educating, encouraging and supporting parents to have successful, enjoyable, breastfeeding relationships with their babies. This has been the main focus of her work.
She has worked privately as a Lactation Consultant since 2005. She has published two books, both on breastfeeding. Her most recent is 'Brilliant Breastfeeding: A Sensible Guide'. This was published in October 2018. This book aims to sensitively guide parents and future parents towards fulfilling breastfeeding relationships with up-to-date, evidence-based information. Attention is paid to the many challenges that parents face.
Jo loves what she does and never considers it 'work'. She lives with her husband on Kangaroo Island, which is just off the southern coast of South Australia. Her children and five grandchildren live in Sydney and Brisbane.

Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC
Abstract:

A baby’s birth can have a significant impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Medical intervention in normal birthing situations is rife, and globally cesarean rates have soared since 2000. Along with this, breastfeeding rates are less than ideal. A mother who feels a sense of grief about the birth of her baby is consequently more likely to face breastfeeding challenges. IBCLC’s, midwives and medical officers will often begin a breastfeeding consultation by listening to a mother’s unhappy perception of her baby’s birth. This aspect needs to be sensitively supported.

It is high time we take stock and pay more attention to what world health authorities are recommending to improve birthing and thus breastfeeding outcomes. These outcomes can affect a mother’s feelings of empowerment, her physical and mental health. Baby’s health and general development are statistically better when breastfed. There are significant financial savings made by reducing costs in various countries health systems when mothers breastfeed successfully.

There are definite changes we can make, following recommended guidelines and recent research. We can do this individually in our work and also in our affiliations with professional bodies by supporting and encouraging government policymakers and advocacy groups. These are our future challenges.

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Sarah Reece-Stremtan MD is an associate professor of pediatrics and anesthesiology at the George Washington University in Washington DC. Her clinical practice is centered at Children's National Hospital in DC, where she works as a pediatric anesthesiologist, acute pain physician, and acupuncturist. She has particularly strong interests in perioperative preservation of breastfeeding, with specific expertise in safety of anesthesia and analgesia medications used by breastfeeding mothers. She has spoken at Congressional Briefings on the need for enhanced research into the use of medications by breastfeeding and pregnant women, and sits on working group #4 within a federal task force developed to enhance Research Specific to Pregnant Women and Lactating Women (PRGLAC).

She has long been involved with the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, authoring multiple clinical protocols, chairing various committees, and most recently serving as Treasurer for 2 terms after 5 years as a member of the Board of Directors.

Abstract:

Many women plan to use various pain medications during labour, with epidural analgesia being the most common type of pain relief utilized in many North American hospitals. Medications used for pain relief during labour cross transplacentally to the infant, with varying effects demonstrated on infants and mothers with regards to breastfeeding. Here we will take a closer look at what is involved in pain transmission signals, the medications that help with pain relief during labour, and the effects of these medications on initiation of breastfeeding. We will discuss issues relating to cesarean delivery, and we will also spend a little time at the end reviewing considerations around general anesthesia for breastfeeding mothers.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE

Dianne Cassidy is a Lactation Consultant in Rochester, New York with Advanced Lactation Certification.  Dianne works in Private Practice, and in a busy Pediatrician office supporting mothers and babies. She also teaches prenatal breastfeeding and childbirth in the hospital setting.  In the fall of 2013, Dianne completed her MA in Health and Wellness/Lactation.  She is dedicated to serving mothers and babies, and has the unique ability to identify with the needs and concerns of new mothers.  Dianne has worked extensively with women who have survived trauma, babies struggling with tongue tie, birth trauma, milk supply issues, attachment, identifying latch problems, returning to work and breastfeeding multiples.

Dianne has 3 biological children, including twins, 3 step children and a wonderful husband.  Dianne is an author and public speaker and enjoys teaching caregivers how to support new families through breastfeeding struggles.

USA Dianne Cassidy, MS, IBCLC, ALC, CCE
Abstract:

Epidural use during labor has been increasing over the last several years. Along with the increase in epidural use, we have also seen an increase in cesarean deliveries, breastfeeding issues, and a decrease in breastfeeding duration. Increasing breastfeeding support to women who desire a medicated delivery may help to increase breastfeeding rates overall. This presentation will help the provider to become more aware of the possible negative effects that may prevail when epidural use during labor and delivery is promoted as safe for both mother and baby. Women should have the opportunity to make an informed decision about their medical care. It is the responsibility of providers who are working with new mothers and babies to recognize when breastfeeding is affected by medical intervention and are able to offer proper support.

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Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 23.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Jeni Stevens, RN (Hon Class 1), RM, IBCLC

Jeni Stevens is a PhD candidate from the University of Western Sydney. Jeni is a mum of four boys, a Registered Nurse and Midwife who has worked in Sydney Hospitals since 2007. Two years ago she became a lactation consultant, and has a passion in educating people about breastfeeding. She has previously completed research which focused on midwives and doulas perspectives of the role of a doula.

Australia Jeni Stevens, RN (Hon Class 1), RM, IBCLC
Abstract:

Background:
Skin to Skin Contact (SSC)
The WHO and UNICEF recommend that the mother and newborn should have skin-to-skin contact (SSC) immediately after birth, including after a caesarean section if the woman is alert and responsive (Baby Friendly Health Initiative, 2012, World Health Organization and UNICEF, 2009). Skin-to-skin contact can be defined as placing a naked infant onto the bare chest of the mother (or father) (Crenshaw et al., 2012,Finigan and Davies, 2004, Velandia et al., 2010, Velandia et al., 2012, Hung and Berg, 2011, Nolan and Lawrence, 2009, Gouchon et al., 2010).
Aim:
To provide insight into how to implement SSC in theatre.
Results:
Immediate SSC can be provided safely in the operating theatre with the collaboration and education of staff, mothers and partners. Consent needs to be confirmed and the mother needs to be prepared before her CS. Once the baby is born and determined to be responding normally and if the mother is alert and responsive, the baby is moved immediately to the mothers’ chest and dried. The midwife then makes sure the baby is secure and monitors them. A literature review also provided some evidence, however limited, demonstrating an increase in maternal and newborn emotional wellbeing, an increase in parent/newborn communication, reduction in maternal pain/anxiety, physiological stability for the mother and newborn and improved breastfeeding outcomes (Crenshaw et al., 2012, Finigan and Davies, 2004, Velandia et al., 2010, Velandia et al., 2012, Hung and Berg, 2011, Nolan and Lawrence, 2009, Gouchon et al., 2010, Stevens et al., 2014).
Conclusion:
If maternity services are not able to provide immediate SSC following a caesarean section, many women and their newborns may miss out on the potential benefits conferred by SSC (Li et al., 2012).

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Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Jan Tedder, BSN, FNP, IBCLC

An inspiring international teacher and published author, Jan Tedder is a nurse practitioner and lactation consultant who was honored as the NC Maternal-Child Nurse of the Year and the recipient of the American Nurses Association’s 2020 Innovative Nurse Award. Jan worked in primary care for decades and trained nurses and physician residents in well-child care and lactation support. She developed HUG Your Baby, an international education program to help parents and the professionals who serve them, understand a child’s behavior and help mothers meet their breastfeeding goals. Available in six languages, her work has been accessed by thousands of professionals around the world used in 50 countries and tribal nations.

U.S.A. Jan Tedder, BSN, FNP, IBCLC
Abstract:

Research confirms that misunderstanding a baby’s behavior decreases breastfeeding duration, lowers parent confidence and increases stress and postpartum depression. Literature on “Responsive Parenting” confirms how learning to notice, understand and respond appropriately to a baby’s behavior positively impacts early parenting, breastfeeding duration and the growth and development of a baby. Midwives are uniquely positioned to enhance a family’s ability to meet their parenting and breastfeeding goals. However, other research suggest that information provided patients does not always meet the needs of today’s young families. This presentation reviews efficient, cost-effective tools, tips and techniques that foster “Responsive Parenting”, boost the confidence of new parents and help families meet their breastfeeding goals.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Linda Smith, MPH, IBCLC

Linda J. Smith, MPH, FACCE, IBCLC, FILCA is a lactation consultant, childbirth educator, author, and internationally-known consultant on breastfeeding and birthing issues. Linda is ILCA’s liaison to the World Health Organization’s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative and consultant to INFACT Canada/IBFAN North America. She holds a Master’s in Public Health, is an Adjunct Instructor in the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University in Dayton OH, and is the author of 4 textbooks on birth and breastfeeding and the book Sweet Sleep for parents. She has lectured in at least 15 countries; her presentations have been translated into 10 languages including Inuktitut. She owns the Bright Future Lactation Resource Centre, on the Internet at www.BFLRC.com.

USA Linda Smith, MPH, IBCLC
Abstract:

For breastfeeding to succeed, the baby must be able and willing to feed; the mother must be able and willing to let her baby nurse many hours a day and night; breastfeeding should be comfortable and pleasant for both; and circumstances and surroundings must support the dyad so the mother feels free to continue. Birth medications, procedures, and the attitudes of attendants can create significant barriers for the mother, baby, or both. This presentation focuses on mechanical forces and drugs that affect the baby’s ability to suck, swallow, and breathe during feeding.

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Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.