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Birth, Pregnancy & Postpartum Around the World Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Birth, Pregnancy & Postpartum Around the World for PREGNANCY, LABOUR & CHILDBIRTH professional training. These Birth, Pregnancy & Postpartum Around the World online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Birth, Pregnancy & Postpartum Around the World education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Karen Lawford, PhD, RM, AM

Dr. Karen Lawford (Ph.D., R.M., A.M.) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Queen’s University and an Adjunct Research Professor in the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. She is a member of Lac Seul First Nation

She is the first registered midwife and Indigenous midwife in Canada to obtain a doctoral degree and hold a university appointment. She advocates for maternity care that allows community members to give birth in their communities and on the land, and has explored the resiliency and resistance of women evacuated from their communities for birth. She also conducts research that examines the leadership of Indigenous women and Two Spirit people within health. She is a founding member of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives.

Dr. Lawford is a 2020 Indspire Laureate in the category of Health. She also serves as a Senator for Queen’s University.

Canada Karen Lawford, PhD, RM, AM
Abstract:

Since the formation of Canada in 1867, the Canadian government has systematically imposed a Euro-Western biomedical model of maternity care on Indigenous peoples. Colonialism and white supremacy rationalized the development of the Indian Residential School system with Christian organizations in attempts to “kill the Indian in the child.” Government goals were to civilize and assimilate Indigenous Peoples into a generic Canadian identity for the sake of nation building and colonial expansion. Eugenic ideologies underpinned the reduction of Indigenous populations through the forced, coercive, and covert sterilization of Indigenous women and girls. In Canada, two provinces had a Sexual Sterilization Act (Alberta and British Columbia), although it was practiced throughout the country. In the area of maternity care, Canadian healthcare systems have consistently failed Indigenous people and their children as evidenced by having highest IMR in Canada. Despite this, Indigenous midwifery and improved child and maternal health for Indigenous people, families, and communities can be realized. A return of birth to the land, recognition of Indigenous women’s and Two Spirit leadership in the provision of excellent culturally-informed, anti-colonial maternity care will contribute to the improved health and wellbeing of Indigenous Peoples.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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India Priyanka Idicula, CPM, FACCE, LCCE, M.sc

Priyanka Idicula is a Certified professional International midwife (U.S.A) and a Lamaze certified childbirth educator(FACCE,LCCE). She is currently the director of Birthvillage the natural birthing centre one of India’s popular natural birth centres and is the managing trustee for birth for change (NGO) India. She also has extensive experience in working in maternity care with pregnant teenagers as part of the Tejus home project one of its kind in India.

She has presented various papers on holistic maternity care and has been the face of India at various international midwifery conferences. She has also been invited to speak as a guest speaker at various nursing colleges on midwifery education and human rights in childbirth in India. She has been honoured with one world birth hero runner up championship in 2011. She has been awarded the "Lifetime Achievement Award for Service to Mother Baby" by Midwifery Today recognising midwifery leadership and in the promotion of birth as normal life event in 2018 at Germany. She has also been awarded the best midwife of the year 2019 at the International breastfeeding conference, India. She is also one of the early pioneers for water birth in India in 2010. She is also the first Asian to win the dual scholarship from Lamaze International She also carries with her Bachelors and Masters in microbiology.

India Priyanka Idicula, CPM, FACCE, LCCE, M.sc
Abstract:

16 million adolescents give birth in India annually which roughly translates to 100 percent of teenage pregnancies worldwide. The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) predicted “India will retain the biggest national adolescent girl population, with hardly any net change from 2010 to 2030 (93 million to 95 million)”. Birth Village, the natural birthing center, is the only free-standing natural birth center with midwife led care based currently in India.

In 2012 we formalized our second not for profit organization Birth for Change, and in conjunction with another NGO Dil se, have been successfully running Tejus, a home, the only one of its kind in India for young children who enter pregnancy primarily through violence. We provide a safe space where this section of vulnerable population obtain nourishment, childbirth education and exercise classes, facilitating supportive relationships, birth services and postpartum services. We have also expanded to provide an additional foundling space where the mothers can keep their babies. This presentation provides a look some of our research, including birth narratives recorded with consent, and provides a focused look at the midwifery care of adolescent pregnancies.

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Presentations: 16  |  Hours / CE Credits: 16.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Margreet co-Founded the Healthy Mom and Baby Clinic in Jeffrey’s Bay, South Africa (www.hmbc.co.za). This is a non-profit organization committed to delivering professional private care to the most vulnerable and underprivileged women of their community. She also works as a private midwife and is known as ‘The Surfing Midwife’ (www.thesurfingmidwife.com). She is currently the managing director at Sister Lilian Centre (www.sisterlilian.co.za) and Sensitive Midwifery (www.senstivemidwifery.co.za) a national education platform for midwives and parents. She finds herself in a transitioning stage where her local, small scale operations, are developing into a national and international platform to be a voice and champion the midwifery profession as a whole. This is in line with her PhD, which is looking at strategies to scale-up clinical midwifery practices in South Africa. She can call herself a pro-surfer as she has placed herself twice at the WSL World Longboarding Championship and still compete in various surfing competitions in South Africa.

She obtained her Bachelors degree in Midwifery from the Artevelde Hogeschool in Gent, Belgium (2002). She furthered her studies with a BcurHons in Advanced Midwifery and Neonatal Nursing Science (2012), a Master’s Research in Midwifery (2014) and a Doctorate in Philosophy (PhD) in Midwifery, all at the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

Abstract:

Despite a steady drop globally in maternal and newborn deaths since 1990, thousands of women and newborns still die each year during pregnancy and childbirth. South Africa, together with other countries, failed to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing maternal mortality by three quarters by 2015. This is despite the positive efforts made in the country towards achieving these goals. However, much more still needs to be done. For that reason, proper and safe care of labouring women remains the identified major focus to prevent these deaths.

The study was the culmination of an investigation into the problem of poor performance regarding maternal and perinatal outcomes as identified by the researcher. The aim of the study was to understand the experiences and perceptions of the women and the midwives regarding the clinical practices in public maternity units in South Africa in order to facilitate the scaling-up of the midwifery practice.

The study found that midwives were committed to provide quality care but major factors needed to be addressed to facilitate scaling-up of clinical midwifery practices. The midwifery profession needed to be strengthened and an enabling working environment provided. Based on the results of the study as well as the theoretical, conceptual and contextual framework, two strategies were developed:
Strategy 1: Empowering midwives to deliver woman-centred care in public sector maternity units
Strategy 2: Creating an enabling work environment in order to deliver woman-centred care in public sector maternity units

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Presentations: 14  |  Hours / CE Credits: 14.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Kamilla Gerhard Nielsen is as obstetrician and psychotherapist part of the delivery unit in Aabenraa in Southern Denmark. A unit that has worked towards minimizing intervention in a safe environment with good outcome for mother and child. After joint effort from doctors and midwifes the department now has a cesarean section rate of 13 %, which is the lowest in Denmark. The rate of elective cesarean is 3 % and the unit has a high rating of satisfaction in Denmark from women giving birth.

Kamilla teaches with Obstetriwise.dk in several countries on the Upright Breech Birth, Fear of Childbirth and Occiput Posterior workshops. All theoretical and practical workshops with the aim of reducing unnecessary intervention in childbirth.

Abstract:The cesarean delivery rate in America has increased steadily from 5% to 30-32% over the last 50 years, along with an increase in costs as well as short- and long-term maternal, neonatal and childhood complications. In Denmark, extensive teamwork between obstetricians and midwives has succeeded in reducing the cesarean section rate at the Hospital of Southern Jutland (SHS). Ten initiatives were implemented over eight years from 2010 to 2018. The department focused on natural childbirth, teamwork, vaginal breech birth, VBAC and only performing cesarean section (CS) when medically indicated.
After implementation of the initiatives at SHS the rate of elective CS decreased from 8% to 3%, emergency CS stable at 13%, and the overall CS rate decreased from 20% to 16% in 2021. In comparison the national rate went from 21% to 19%.
These reductions were made without any significant increase in birth complications such as instrumentation at vaginal delivery, low pH or low Apgar scores. One of the biggest changes at SHS is the rate of vaginal birth after previous cesarean section. The department has a team working to support women with fear of childbirth by making specific birthing plans. The department shares a belief that a good vaginal birth experience is better than an elective cesarean if the women feels safe.
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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 8  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
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Australia Vicki Chan, RN, RM

Vicki Chan is the mother of four children, and one very happy grandmother. She has been a midwife since 1983, working in hospitals, birth centre, and 25 years in homebirth practice. Presently she is working in a private hospital facilitating normal birth and has private practice rights at the Sunshine Coast University Hospital. She leads (radical) preparation for birth for parents-to-be and, with midwife Lynne Staff, is co-presenter for the Better Birth Workshops for birth-workers. She loves to write poetry, make pottery, and has published her first children’s book.

Australia Vicki Chan, RN, RM
Abstract:

Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced little improvement in maternity outcomes in recent years (World Health Organization[WHO], 2014) and yet, in an informal settlement in Nairobi, where the urban poor suffer the greatest losses of mothers and babies (Ndirangu, 2015; Ziraba, Madise, Mills, Kyobutungi, & Ezeh, 2009), one place stands out.

“An equal chance at life and love”.
This phrase is embedded into the vision of the not-for-profit, privately-run Fremo Birth Centre(FBC).
Although under-staffed and under-resourced, the FreMo Birth Centre provides
o  free/small cost maternity care focusing on normal birth, including breech, twins, VBAC.
o  well baby/well woman/family planning/post abortion care.
o  zero maternal mortality or serious injury (including no 3rddegree tears or beyond)
o  neonatal morbidity/mortality far below national figures.
(Fremo Medical and Birth Centre, 2011-2017; WHO, 2014).
On behalf of those heroes who run the centre on a day-to-day basis, I am honoured to tell their story. Vicki Chan

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.