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Lactation After Perinatal, Neonatal, & Infant Loss Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Lactation After Perinatal, Neonatal, & Infant Loss for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Lactation After Perinatal, Neonatal, & Infant Loss online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Lactation After Perinatal, Neonatal, & Infant Loss education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Webinar

Lactation Choices Following Pre-and-perinatal Loss

By Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Kathy Parkes is a registered nurse, IBCLC, and Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA) with over 30 years of experience in lactation management and education. She has been actively involved with breastfeeding coalitions at the local, state, and international levels. Now a published author, her first book, “Perspectives in Lactation: Is Private Practice for Me?”, sold out the first printing in only 48 hours. Kathy has worked in multiple lactation settings, including the hospital, private practice, education, home health care, and in the US-based Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) program. As a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator, Kathy heads the Perinatal Loss Program at her hospital, and leads a Griefshare program in the community. Happily married for 39 years, she has 2 daughters, and 3 grandchildren, all breastfed.

us Kathy Parkes, MSN-Ed, BSPsy, RN, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Professionals working with new mothers and infants are drawn to the field by compassion. However, when a loss occurs, whether prenatally or following birth, many of us are unprepared to deal with the loss ourselves, or in assisting the family. One of the many decisions that needs to be made in this time of grief is how the mother will deal with lactogenesis II, the surge of breast milk at two to four days. This session will provide an overview of anatomy and physiology of milk production, and discuss various choices the mother can make regarding how she will deal with the milk supply that occurs. To close the session, the speaker will briefly discuss self-care for professionals to aid recovery from such a loss.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Australia Katherine Carroll, PhD, BPhysiotherapy, BA (Hons)

Katherine is a Senior Lecturer at School of Sociology, Australian National University. Katherine’s particular areas of interest include the sociology of reproduction and motherhood, perinatal medicine, lactation sciences, human milk banking and donation. Her current projects include an Australian Research Council funded study on maternal experiences of lactation after infant death, and a Mayo Clinic funded research project on the communication with families regarding periviable infant resuscitation.

Australia Katherine Carroll, PhD, BPhysiotherapy, BA (Hons)
Abstract:

Every day, around the world, many mothers are faced with the complex task of managing the initial onset, or continuation, of their lactation following a late miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal or infant loss. This presentation explores findings from a multi-year, multi-site Australian study conducted with bereaved families and health professionals that confirmed the limited nature and scope of lactation care currently available to bereaved families.

This presentation will provide evidence of the need and benefit of approaching lactation after infant death using a biopsychosocial care framework, so that bereaved families are able to make informed decisions from the full array of lactation management options that may be available including: suppression, sustained expression, breastmilk donation or using milk as memento. The challenges involved in providing bereaved lactation care will be acknowledged and discussed. Health professionals will be advised on what information and support bereaved families need and want, how and when this information may be best provided and who may be best placed to offer lactation care to bereaved families.

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Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 29.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.