Infant Sleep

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United Kingdom Helen Ball, BSc, MA, PhD

Helen Ball trained in Human Biology and Biological Anthropology, obtaining her PhD at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1992. She established the Parent-Infant Sleep Lab at Durham University in 2000, was promoted to Professor in 2007 and served as Head of the Anthropology Department 2013-2016.

Her research examines the sleep ecology of infants and their parents including attitudes and practices regarding infant sleep, behavioral and physiological monitoring of infants and their parents during sleep, infant sleep development, and the discordance between cultural sleep preferences and biological sleep needs. She conducts research in hospitals and the community and contributes to national and international policy and practice guidelines on infant care.

In 2016 she was appointed as Chair of the Scientific Committee for the Lullaby Trust, and in 2018 Durham University received the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Further and Higher Education for Helen’s research and outreach work. She is a Board Member of ISPID (the International Society for the Study and Prevention of Infant Deaths) and directs the Durham Infancy & Sleep Centre (DISC) and Baby Sleep Information Source (Basis).

United Kingdom Helen Ball, BSc, MA, PhD
Abstract:

Many assumptions exist about the origins and purpose of baby-boxes and their use as a safe infant sleep space; this misinformation needs correcting, especially as it relates to SIDS-reduction. Baby-box schemes take multiple forms from those motivated by social welfare to those motivated by commercial profit. Programmes offering carboard baby boxes to parents in England began in some NHS Trusts in 2016. We examined the pros and cons of English baby-box schemes via an independent evaluation conducted using telephone interviews and online surveys with healthcare providers and parents in all 7/9 NHS regions of England where baby-box schemes were established 2017-2019. The objectives were to produce recommendations for organisations considering involvement in future schemes. We found baby-box schemes changed over time, and were complex to run and monitor. Both parents and practitioners were misinformed about their purpose and origins. The English experience of partnership schemes between healthcare facilities and commercial box-providers reveals some success stories, along with multiple points of ambiguity, unanticipated difficulty, and concerns for infant safety. Sixteen recommendations are proposed for healthcare providers and organisations considering commercial - health-provider baby-box partnerships in future.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Melissa Bartick, MD, MSc, FABM

Melissa Bartick, MD, MSc, FABM works as a hospitalist at Mt. Auburn Hospital in Cambridge MA, is an internist and is an Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She has numerous breastfeeding publications in peer-reviewed journals. She served as the chair of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition from 2002 to 2014, where she was also a founder of Ban the Bags. She served on the Board of Directors of the United States Breastfeeding Committee from 2009-2015. She has served on the Board of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine since 2019, where she has coauthored clinical protocols, including the 2020 Bedsharing and Breastfeeding protocol. She was founder of the Breastfeeding Forum of the American Public Health Association, where she served two terms as chair. She is founder and co-chair of her state’s Baby-Friendly Hospital Collaborative. She has blog contributions to the Huffington Post, the WBUR CommonHealth Blog, among others. Dr. Bartick received her BA from the University of Virginia and holds an MSc in Health and Medical Sciences from University of California, Berkeley and an MD from University of California, San Francisco. She works as a hospitalist at Mount Auburn Hospital and is the mother of two grown sons. As of June 2020, she is pursuing an MPH at Harvard School of Public Health.

United States Melissa Bartick, MD, MSc, FABM
Abstract:

Bedsharing promotes breastfeeding, but many authorities recommend against bedsharing for all mothers, citing safety concerns, particularly risk of sudden infant death syndrome or suffocation risks. Here we will review the normal physiology of mother-infant sleep, and the historical context in which such recommendations evolved. In addition, many populations have high rates of bedsharing with low rates of death. In this context, we will review the evidence around bedsharing and the most current evidence-based recommendations. Some risk factors for SIDS are more powerful than others, and we will review the best ways to minimize such risks, including a social-determinants of health approach. In some circumstances, bedsharing may carry particular risks and it is important to be able to discuss these issues with parents without stigma. We will discuss counseling of all parents in the “risk-minimization” approach, which would also allow for promotion of breastfeeding.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Erin Shaheen, BsocSc, R.S.S.W

Erin is a Parent Educator in Ottawa, Canada and the mother of four young adults, including twins. After working in the area of community mental health as a Registered Social Service Worker, she jumped into Prenatal and Parenting education with the Ottawa Childbirth Education Association where she has been designing and providing classes for expectant parents, grandparents, and families expecting multiples for the last 20 years. She divides her time between teaching a class called Bringing Baby home to expectant parents, Normal Infant Sleep classes and working as a Postpartum Doula. In 2018 she returned to school to complete her M.ed for Healthcare Professionals.

Canada Erin Shaheen, BsocSc, R.S.S.W
Abstract:

Parents experience a lack of formal and informal education on normal newborn sleep patterns. This absence of information through group prenatal classes or perinatal appointments with healthcare providers results in unrealistic expectations of life with their newborn. Coupled with geographic isolation from extended family support systems or extended family members who have different recollections of newborn sleep patterns, parents turn to crowdsourcing information on social media. The prolific advertising of sleep training on social media platforms increases parental fear, leaving parents overwhelmed with the increasingly contradictory information on sleep and strategies for coping.

This presentation will address the situations that lead to unsafe bed sharing and social pressure to sleep train. Participants will have an understanding of the concerns that parents bring to sleep classes for both infants and toddlers. Collaborative strategies for responsive nighttime parenting that respects brain development; attachment theory, nighttime feeds, and balanced with parents need for sleep and self-care will be the focus. Opportunities for education that include online, individual and group opportunities will be offered including a collaborative effort between parents, family, community and healthcare providers.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United Kingdom Helen Ball, BSc, MA, PhD

Helen Ball trained in Human Biology and Biological Anthropology, obtaining her PhD at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1992. She established the Parent-Infant Sleep Lab at Durham University in 2000, was promoted to Professor in 2007 and served as Head of the Anthropology Department 2013-2016.

Her research examines the sleep ecology of infants and their parents including attitudes and practices regarding infant sleep, behavioral and physiological monitoring of infants and their parents during sleep, infant sleep development, and the discordance between cultural sleep preferences and biological sleep needs. She conducts research in hospitals and the community and contributes to national and international policy and practice guidelines on infant care.

In 2016 she was appointed as Chair of the Scientific Committee for the Lullaby Trust, and in 2018 Durham University received the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Further and Higher Education for Helen’s research and outreach work. She is a Board Member of ISPID (the International Society for the Study and Prevention of Infant Deaths) and directs the Durham Infancy & Sleep Centre (DISC) and Baby Sleep Information Source (Basis).

United Kingdom Helen Ball, BSc, MA, PhD
Abstract:

The sleep of young babies is biologically driven, firstly by feeding patterns and the limitations of brain development, and over time by an emerging circadian clock. The sleep patterns of parents are environmentally driven, by work and social schedules, 24-hour culture and use of digital technology. How do parents ‘manage’ night-time infant care and the sleep conflicts inherent in contemporary life? How are digital media influencing parental knowledge, expectations, and behaviour? Our research finds an emerging dichotomy in maternal ‘sleep narratives’ that are reinforced by the use of phone apps to monitor and manage infant sleep, online discussions where mothers share their experiences and techniques, and websites promoting infant sleep products. The potential for using digital media to inform parents about babies’ biological needs at night will be explored using examples from our experiences of developing and implementing website, phone app, social media and video podcast information sources for infant sleep.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Elly Taylor is a perinatal relationship expert, award winning author, creator and founder of Becoming Us. As a relationship counsellor and a new mother at the same time, Elly personally and professionally experienced the gap in preparation and support for the life changes and relationship challenges that come with early parenthood. Fast forward 20 years and Elly's passion is helping parenthood professionals to support the mental, emotional and relationship wellbeing of expecting and new parents. Her Becoming Us approach provides parents with a research and evidence-based pathway through the parenthood territory so families can know how to thrive as they grow. Elly has presented Becoming Us at national and international conferences, served on the advisory panel for various university research projects and trains professionals worldwide to be Parenthood Tour Guides.

Abstract:

"The “transition” into parenthood is supposed to be a time of joy, love and wonder, and yet research paints a very different picture: currently 1 in 3 mothers and 1 in 5 fathers suffer from anxiety or depression during the perinatal period. You might also be shocked to know that 92% of couples report increased conflict and 67% a decline in relationship satisfaction in the first few years of family.
And referring to parenthood as a “transition” is misleading – there are, in fact, multiple transitions for couples to navigate.
Including fathers or partners in pregnancy, birth and the multiple transitions of early parenthood helps to reduce both mothers' and fathers' risks for anxiety, depression and relationship problems and supports both parents' mental, emotional and relationship health, so the whole family can thrive. In this presentation, practitioners will learn simple and easy ways to include fathers and partners, even if they’re not in the room, and discover how small things can make a big difference to a family’s future.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Karen Kerkhoff Gromada, MSN, RN, IBCLC, FILCA

Karen Kerkhoff Gromada, MSN, RN, IBCLC, FILCA has been an IBCLC since 1991 and has worked as an IBCLC in both private practice and hospital settings. She also has experience as an adjunct clinical instructor for the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing and as a staff nurse in labor and delivery, childbirth education and postpartum discharge nursing care. Gromada was accredited as a La Leche League (LLL) Leader in 1975 and formed the first LLL group for mothers of multiples after the birth of her twin sons. The experiences of the group’s mothers provided the basis for her book Mothering Multiples: Breastfeeding and Caring for Twins or More. Her numerous articles and chapters about breastfeeding multiples have been published in professional and lay publications. A former International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) president (1994-96), she was designated Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association (FILCA) in 2008.

USA Karen Kerkhoff Gromada, MSN, RN, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

Sleep deprivation and disruption of an individual’s circadian patterns in the postnatal period are frequently cited as contributing factors in the development of postpartum depression, anxiety (PPD&A) or postpartum post-traumatic stress symptoms (P-PTSS). These factors are increased for the birthing parent of twins, triplets or more, who is more likely to bring two or more newborns home after experiencing perinatal complications and related interventions, and infants’ preterm birth, low birth weight and other complications, often resulting in neonatal intensive care unit stays. Even for a relatively ideal multiple pregnancy and birth, caring for two or more newborns – each having as many needs as any single-birth newborn – round-the-clock parenting generally leads to profound and often long-term sleep deprivation. When significant sleep deprivation affects a parent’s daytime behavior, all family members are affected. Yet current “safe sleep” recommendations or nighttime strategies promoting better sleep for parents and a single infant, including safer bedsharing techniques, are more difficult logistically to implement. These recommendations and strategies may also be less safe to implement with multiple infants. This session will examine the factors contributing to disruptive sleep for parents of multiples and develop strategies that meet both infants and parents needs for adequate sleep.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Kendall-Tackett is a health psychologist, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women's health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is Editor-in-Chief of two peer-reviewed journals: Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is Fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, Past President of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of the APA’s Publications and Communications Board and Journal Advisory Committee. Dr. Kendall-Tackett specializes in women's-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology, and has won many awards for her work including the 2019 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division of Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 460 articles or chapters and is author or editor of 39 books. Her most recent books include: Depression in New Mothers, 3rd Edition (2017, Routledge UK), Women’s Mental Health Across the Lifespan (2017, Routledge US, with Lesia Ruglass), and The Phantom of the Opera: A Social History of the World’s Most Popular Musical (2018, Praeclarus).

Abstract:

Policy makers often describe mother-infant sleep in fairly black-and-white terms, and try to condense their message into a single declarative statement: don’t sleep with your baby. Recent research, however, shows that mother-infant sleep is considerably more complex than it is usually portrayed. This presentation discusses new findings from the U.S. sample of the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue (n=4789). These findings describe the groups most likely to bedshare including differences by ethnic-group, income, employment status, partner status, maternal age, income, and education. There are substantial ethnic-group differences on the percentage of mothers who feed in chairs and recliners (e.g., African American mothers have very low rates of these dangerous behaviors). There are also large ethnic-group differences in where mothers and their partners think babies should sleep, and this will govern behavior. Using the full sample of the Survey (N=6410), this presentation also examines sleep location by feeding status. Breastfeeding/bedsharing mothers do the best of all groups on measures of sleep, depression, and anxiety. In contrast, formula-feeding/bedsharing mothers do worse on every measure, suggesting that bedsharing while breastfeeding is a very different physiological condition to bedsharing while formula-feeding. In summary, the findings of both analyses suggest that a single message for all groups will not be effective. It is important to take into account the many different ways that mothers and babies sleep in order to promote safe mother-infant sleep.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Kimberly Bepler, IBCLC, CPD, CNPE, CLE

Kimberly Bepler has been serving families professionally since 2001, and teaching expectant couples and new doulas since 2004. She began first as a postpartum doula, and soon after found a passion to educate so she added breastfeeding and new parent education at her local medical system teaching at 3 different hospitals. She started Pathway 3 back in 2006, and became an IBCLC in 2011. She owns ABC Doula & Newborn Care, a postpartum doula agency in Portland, OR that has served over 2000 families and employs 20 doulas and educators. She is also the mother of 2 almost grown children (a frequently humbling experience) and her family resides in Phoenix near her snowbird parents. Kimberly has taught and served thousands of expectant and new parents, including over 700 families with twins. Building on her experience teaching for 17 years within two hospital systems, she now trains for the New Parent Educator program for those seeking to teach new parent classes in a hospital, community, or private setting. She is the Senior Advisor to the CAPPA Lactation Educator program, and is focused on providing fun and interactive education, not just with great information, but also providing judgement-free classes empowering new parents with skills and confidence. You can find out more about everything she teaches at www.abcdoula.com

U.S.A. Kimberly Bepler, IBCLC, CPD, CNPE, CLE
Abstract:

The Crying Curve is an evidence-based pattern of crying that begins at about 42 weeks of gestation (2 weeks of extrauterine life), peaks at 6-8 weeks of age, and sharply declines by 12-15 weeks. As many as 15 different studies have concluded that this pattern is common across infants of all cultures, gestational ages (based on a 40-week gestation), and parenting styles—and the applications are many in the early parenting world. How can parents use this pattern to help them navigate breastfeeding? How can they gather their support people, family or village to maximize positive relationships and get the support they crave? How can they utilize it to help assess their newborn and understand what is needed for their specific situation? How much crying is too much crying? Lactation consultants, postpartum doulas, and other postpartum professionals who possess this information are well positioned to help to educate parents on how to best approach their postpartum recovery period, as well as navigate the ups and downs of breastfeeding and early newborn sleep. This session will aim to explain and apply the Crying Curve in multiple ways to support and guide the newborn family.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Darcia Narvaez, Professor Emerita of Psychology, University of Notre Dame researches moral development and flourishing from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating anthropology, neuroscience, clinical, developmental and educational sciences. Her earlier careers include professional musician, business owner, classroom music teacher, classroom Spanish teacher and seminarian, among other things. She grew up bilingual/bicultural but calls the earth her home. Dr. Narvaez’s current research explores how early life experience influences wellbeing and moral character in children and adults. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Educational Research Association and former editor of the Journal of Moral Education. She is on the advisory boards of Attachment Parenting International, Kindred, Your Whole Baby, and the Self Reg Institute. She has numerous publications, including more than 20 books such as Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom: First Nation Know-how for Global Flourishing; Basic Needs, Wellbeing and Morality: Fulfilling Human Potential and Embodied Morality: Protectionism, Engagement and Imagination. A recent book, Neurobiology and the Development of Human Morality: Evolution, Culture and Wisdom won the 2015 William James Book Award from the American Psychological Association and the 2017 Expanded Reason Award. She blogs for Psychology Today (“Moral Landscapes”) and hosts the webpage EvolvedNest.org.

Abstract:

Every animal has a developmental system or nest for its young that matches up with the maturational schedule of offspring. Humans have a nest too although many people don’t realize it. The human nest refers to the experiences and care that a child receives after birth and in the years that follow. Modern child raising has changed significantly from the nest of our ancestors with concerning results. Learn more about the epigenetic impact of the early nest and how early life experience influences wellbeing and sociomoral character in children and adults as well as societal culture. Delegates will gain an understanding of the essential components of the early nest (including touch, responsivity, breastfeeding, alloparents, positive social support, play, and soothing perinatal experiences) along with ways to empower parents to incorporate them into their infant’s care to create a foundation for lifelong health and well being.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC, La Leche League Leader

Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC, is a co-author, with Diana West, Linda Smith, and Teresa Pitman, of La Leche League International’s Sweet Sleep Nighttime and Naptime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family. She is also a co-author, with Diana West and Teresa Pitman, of the 8th edition of LLLl's Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. Other publications include chapters in Genna's Supporting Sucking Skills in Breastfeeding Infants and Smith's The ABC's of Private Practice, and journal articles and essays on latching, lip ties, D-MER, motherhood in other mammals, and breastfeeding language. Diane self-publishes more than 75 breastfeeding handouts for mothers. She has spoken in over 40 states and provinces and in Europe, Asia, and Oceania.

USA Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC, La Leche League Leader
Abstract:

Many health care workers advocate a no-bedsharing policy, no exceptions. Others recognize that most breastfeeding mothers will share sleep with their babies at times, safely or unsafely; may even have bedshared themselves; and feel they lack the tools to help prevent unsafe shared sleep. Still others recommend safe bedsharing as the normal and easiest way to meet a baby’s needs and facilitate breastfeeding. The Safe Sleep Seven offers a middle ground: Seven research-supported criteria which, if met, offer a level of bedsharing safety equivalent to crib safety. For those mothers who don’t meet the criteria, it provides a simple way for them to make educated decisions about their family’s nighttime parenting. And it helps every non-bedsharing breastfeeding mother “child-proof” her bed so that it is as safe as possible if there’s a night when she just can’t stay awake to nurse.

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Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.