Ethics for Lactation Professionals

These presentations deal with common ethical issues that health care providers may face, and ways that health care providers can ensure that they are practicing in an ethical manner and staying within their scope of practice.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
CAN Joy Noel-Weiss, RN, IBCLC

Joy Noel-Weiss RN IBCLC is an assistant professor in the School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa. Dr. Noel-Weiss researches breastfeeding and human lactation. Professor Noel-Weiss' doctoral research study was titled Relationship Between Intravenous Fluids Given to Women During Parturition and Their Breastfed Newborns' Weight Loss. Her Masters' research was a randomized controlled trial testing a prenatal breastfeeding workshop designed to increase maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy. For future research, Dr. Noel-Weiss is developing tools to measure infant feeding patterns and to measure clinicians' confidence in their ability (i.e., their self-efficacy) to support individuals who choose to breastfeed.

In addition to these quantitative studies, Dr. Noel-Weiss recently completed qualitative research about ethical dilemmas and lactation consultants and about mothers' experiences using baby scales in their homes. Currently, Dr. Noel-Weiss works with a research team as the principal investigator on a research study titled Transmasculine Individuals' Experiences with Pregnancy, Birthing and Feeding Their Newborns. The study is funded with an operating grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Institute of Gender and Health.

Dr. Noel-Weiss chairs the International Lactation Consultants Association's Ethics and International Code Committee and co-chairs the uOttawa School of Nursing's working group for joint appointees and adjuncts. She has a cross appointment to the Ottawa Hospital and is a member of The Ottawa Hospital Nursing Research Work Group. Recently, Dr. Noel-Weiss became a member of the Champlain Maternal Newborn Regional Program's Breastfeeding Promotion Committee.

CAN Joy Noel-Weiss, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

In this session, Professor Noel-Weiss explains and defines bioethics, principles of bioethics, and ethical dilemmas. She presents results from her research study about IBCLCs and ethical dilemmas and uses case studies to demonstrate how to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 6 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Maya Vasquez, MS, RN, IBCLC

Maya Vasquez is nurse manager of the Birth Center at San Francisco General Hospital in California.  She previously served as lactation consultant and project manager for the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, and led a multidisciplinary task force to achieve Baby Friendly Certification and re-designation.  She works with a diverse patient population, and enjoys learning about the broad variety of human experience through her clients.   Maya is passionate about reducing health disparities by increasing access to quality care, especially through improved maternity care.  She has three adult children and two grandchildren, and lives with her husband near San Francisco.

USA Maya Vasquez, MS, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Cultural humility proposes that health care providers engage in a life-long process of self-reflection and learning in order to better understand the multifaceted identities of their clients. The concept was first described by Tervalon and Murray-Garcia as a reply to the more common concept of cultural competence. Cultural humility suggests that rather than attempting to memorize the myriad practices and beliefs of the many clients, providers to see themselves as students of their patients and allow the patient to guide the provider in creating the best plan of care for each individual. For example, among lactation consultants in the United States there is a commonly held belief that Latino mothers prefer to both breast and bottle feed, leading many lactation consultants to believe that this community will never exclusively breastfeed. This may lead to decreased educational efforts directed at the Latino community, since they may be seen as futile, and may affect the long-term health of vulnerable communities. This presentation will explore the concept of cultural humility, and discuss how lactation consultants may use it to better appreciate the multi-dimensionality of each client’s individual experience.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA

Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA, is a lawyer/litigator (since 1983) and private practice IBCLC lactation consultant (since 1997). Healthcare providers (HCPs) face moral and legal challenges in their clinical care, every day. Liz explains (with plain language and humor) how lactation advocacy, ethics, and the law overlap, in all geographic and work settings. She offers immediate, pragmatic tips so HCPs can practice ethically, legally, and confidently. She is an Adjunct Professor in Drexel University's Human Lactation Consultation Program, recently served as the President of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA), and as a Director of the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC), and is a current Director of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA). She wrote the only textbook focusing on IBCLC ethics and legal issues and authored chapters on similar topics in several other texts. She is a well-received writer and lecturer in her field.


USA Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

It's all about the Internet! Families in 2015 want to be connected to their network of families and friends. They use Internet-accessing devices and social media to share news, gather information and seek opinions. If this is where families are ... can an IBCLC (or other healthcare provider) be there, too, without violating long-standing principles of privacy and professional ethics? Can healthcare providers engage in clinical discussion with someone on Facebook, Twitter, a chat room or a website? What about real-time webinars, or static websites, where mothers type in their clinical questions? Is texting ever permissible? Can a clinician post a picture of a client, or ask colleagues on a private listserv about a tricky case? We'll learn how the Internet is used by new families to seek and share information, and the professional risks of "friendly" clinical care by the IBCLC or HCP who joins the conversation.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 6 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
GB Fiona Woollard, PhD, Associate Professor in Philosophy

Fiona Woollard is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton.  She works in the Philosophy of Pregnancy, Birth and Early Motherhood, with a special interest in infant feeding.  She argues that identifying philosophical mistakes in the way we think about maternal behaviour can help improve conversations about infant feeding decisions.  Her work has been widely published in journals aimed at philosophers, medical professionals and peer supporters, and in venues aimed at a general audience.  To read more about her work on infant feeding, see https://fionawoollard.weebly.com/infant-feeding.html

GB Fiona Woollard, PhD, Associate Professor in Philosophy
Abstract:

Anecdotal evidence of the perception of pressure surrounding infant feeding decisions is easy to acquire simply by talking to new mothers. Several sociological studies report an association between decisions to formula feed and feelings of guilt, blame and failure. I connect perceived pressure regarding infant feeding decisions to a mistaken assumption that if breastfeeding benefits the child, the mother must have a defeasible duty to breastfeed. I call this the Duty Mistake. I show how the Duty Mistake contributes to guilt and shame surrounding the use of formula. It also produces what I call “the Justification Trap”: in a moralized context, requests for information or offers of support are perceived as calls for justification. This makes it much harder to ensure that women are given the support and information they need to meet their feeding goals. This presentation provides an overview of the issues and looks at how they impact the ethical responsibility of lactation professionals to promote and support breastfeeding.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 6 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.