Categories

-
  • Affordable Educational Credits
  • Watch At Your Convenience
  • Worldwide Speakers
  • Captivating Topics
  • Peer Interactions

Breastfeeding and Lactation

A wide range of presentations providing the latest evidence based information about human lactation, breastfeeding management, and breastfeeding advocacy and promotion.

Hours / Credits: (details)
Learn More
I have been involved in Neonatal care for 25 years and I am a nurse by background with 15 years in senior management the last 7 years I held the position of Clinical Service Manager of Neonatal Services at Cambridge University Hospitals until my retirement last year from the NHS. I was also the Chair of the NNA up until last September when I stepped down after serving two terms in that position. I am delighted to be joining Best Beginnings as the National Facilitator for the Small Wonders Campaign and I am looking forward to working with colleagues who share my commitment to reducing the inequalities that exist within the Child Health arena
Abstract:

Best Beginnings is a charity that was founded in 2006 by our CEO Alison Baum and achieved charitable status in 2007. Best Beginnings Vision and Mission are to be a catalyst for changes by the development of innovative resources for parents and professionals to help reduce the inequalities in child health across the UK from pre conception through to a child’s 3rd Birthday. The way we function is by reaching out to Health Care Professional and families through a media approach and this includes using Facebook, Twitter as well as the more traditional email and WebPages and the use of film telling the “story” from a parents perspective..

There are a number of major projects that have been initiated and are ongoing as well new projects that are in the process of being launched:

  • • From Bump to Breastfeeding 2008
  • • Small Wonders DVD 2012
  • • Baby Express 2014


New projects
  • • Maternal Mental Health Project
  • • Bump Buddy App aimed at the under 25’s and available free of charge on iPhone or Smartphone ( due to be launched in November 2014)

The presentation is an overview of all of the work that is being continued and undertaken by the team at Best Beginnings with background data to support the work that we are performing here in the UK.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 28  |  Hours / CE Credits: 22.25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
webinar

Beyond Baby Friendly, Thinking Outside the Box

By Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jane Morton has had a long, fulfilling career as a general pediatrician, She has also had a long-standing interest in breastfeeding, from understanding its clinical benefits to practical solutions for mothers having difficulty in providing breastmilk to their infants.  Over the years, she has conducted research on human milk and breastfeeding and has designed and implemented systems and policies to help breastfeeding mothers.  She produced award winning videos on this topic, including “Breastfeeding: A Guide to Getting Started”, “A Preemie Needs His Mother: Breastfeeding a Premature Baby” and “Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding”.  These have been translated and widely used in thousands of hospitals to train both staff and new mothers. As an executive board member of both the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding, she enjoyed working to enlarge the footprint of breastfeeding, both nationally and internationally.

For a 5 year period, she joined the neonatology clinical faculty at Stanford to develop the Breastfeeding Medicine Program.  In that position, she had the opportunity to design a nationally recognized educational program, conduct and publish original research on milk production and composition in mothers of very low birth weight infants, and publish a study with the AAP on the efficacy of a breastfeeding curriculum for physician residents in training. She was an advisor to the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, and was a key author of the toolkit “Nutritional Support for the Very Low Birth Weight Infant”. She co-authored the book Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU.  She has published extensively and presented her original research and educational workshops internationally. She continues to teach at Stanford where she is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Emerita.

USA Jane A. Morton, MD; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Abstract:

Complications of insufficient milk production and suboptimal intake account for delayed discharge, readmission, potentially serious medical complications and a sharp drop off in any breastfeeding before 1 month. Reframing lactation support based on prevention, accessibility and sustainability, we could logically reduce these complications, while increasing exclusive breastfeeding rates for both low and at-risk infants. Recent science supports the importance of beginning this support for all mothers in the first post delivery hour, to prevent what might be called, “the lost first hour syndrome”.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC

Melissa Cole, MS, IBCLC, RLC is a board certified lactation consultant, neonatal oral-motor assessment professional, and clinical herbalist in private practice. Melissa has been passionate about providing comprehensive, holistic lactation support and improving the level of clinical lactation skills for health professionals for over a decade. She enjoys teaching, researching and writing about wellness and lactation-related topics. Melissa holds a bachelor of science degree in maternal child health and lactation consulting and her master’s work is in therapeutic, clinical herbalism. Melissa actively conducts research and collaborates with several lactation and health care professional associations.

Before pursuing a path in lactation, Melissa lived and studied in Japan. She was also a language instructor for almost a decade. From this background in culture and education sprung a deep love of supporting and educating families. Melissa also has an extensive background in herbal studies and holistic health. When not helping parents and babies, Melissa can probably be found lecturing, researching, writing, or attending a conference; she is passionate about health and lactation, to say the least!

USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

In a perfect world, every baby would latch beautifully right after delivery and breastfeed happily ever after. In reality what we often see is that most moms and babies need a little help to get breastfeeding off to a good start. Many dyads need a lot of help. And a few mother/baby pairs need a miracle to breastfeed successfully. How can we best help those tough cases? There are many reasons babies struggle to latch and feed well. Some issues may include structural issues, physical discomfort, respiratory concerns, medical issues, digestive issues, poor feeding tool choices, prematurity, etc. Many providers are frustrated when they are unable to help a dyad latch and feed successfully. This presentation will covers some reasons why babies struggle to latch and breastfeed well. We will go over cases that portray challenging situations and the assessment techniques and care plan strategies that helped. This session is designed to help providers implement critical thinking skills in order to think outside the box when it comes to difficult cases.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E

Dr Justine Leach is an advocate for trauma-informed care in the perinatal period and co-founder of Resilient Birth, a company which trains healthcare providers and other perinatal professionals in supporting survivors giving birth. She also helps expectant parents with histories of trauma prepare for childbirth through trauma-informed childbirth education classes and birth support planning. Dr Leach became a B.A.C.E. certified childbirth educator and advocate after the birth of her two children revealed the impact of trauma experiences on childbirth. She has a Ph.D. on representations of sexual consent in narratives of rape and sexual trauma, and facilitates the Trauma-Informed Perinatal Professionals facebook group. Justine speaks about the experience of giving birth as a survivor of rape and the important role healthcare providers and perinatal professionals play in a birth giver’s experience of trauma or healing.

U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E
Abstract:

Survivors of trauma are at an increased risk not only of experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms during their pregnancy, but also birth trauma and postpartum PTSD. Yet too often survivors’ needs are ignored and traditional childbirth preparation is neither trauma-informed nor supportive of survivors’ emotional experiences. This presentation envisions what childbirth preparation looks like from a trauma-informed perspective. It will explore how to create safety in our relationships with birth givers, how to help survivors feel their power, and how to hold space for their emotional journey to parenthood. I discuss the impact of previous trauma on birth givers in pregnancy and birth, and explore what can be done prenatally to prevent birth trauma. Participants will gain practical skills for supporting survivors’ emotional wellbeing and for helping them to plan for a safe birth experience. This involves rethinking the birth plan. Instead of merely articulating a birth givers’ preferences for or against interventions, a birth plan should be rethought as a Birth Support Plan: that is, it should communicate what a birth giver needs to feel safe, understood, and in control of the decisions they make around their care whether their birth goes to plan or not.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

Alia Macrina Heise has worked in the field of lactation since 2004. She is considered the international authority on the topic of dysphoric milk ejection reflex (D-MER). She has been the forerunner in identifying, naming and investigating the anomaly of dysphoria with milk ejection reflex since 2007. She has spoken on the subject at many notable conferences, including GOLD, has given several interviews on the subject for both print and podcasts and has been published through her work on a case study about D-MER for The International Breastfeeding Journal. In 2017 she released the first book on the subject. Alia's passion and enthusiasm for the topic of D-MER are evident in the energy that she demonstrates in her presentations and the novelty of new information on a subject that is not yet well known or understood by many makes for an engaging and interesting presentation. Alia is not only a former sufferer of the lactation anomaly herself, she is also the webmaster of d-mer.org and she works closely with mothers around the world who are suffering with the condition in order to support them and to better understand the variance of the experience. She is also in frequent contact with other professionals in order to spread awareness and to support further research and investigation into the subject. Outside of her work with D-MER, she is also in private practice as an IBCLC in the Finger Lakes region of New York. She lives in a small rural town where she enjoys country living with her three children.

Abstract:

Dysphoric milk ejection reflex (D-MER), is not a new phenomenon. In the past, it was almost like Voldemort, the Problem That Must Not Be Named. But for over 10 years now, it has had a name and been brought into daylight. Though still not widely known or understood by many, the hypothesis of the mechanism and possible sustainable solutions are becoming better documented all the time. D-MER has been the subject of two case studies, one case series, and a qualitative research study. Two other studies as also in process at this time.

Mothers with D-MER feel, as a reflexive response with every single milk release, a wave of negative emotions ranging (depending on severity) from homesickness to hopelessness and despair, perhaps even anger and suicidal ideation. These emotions dissipate shortly after milk release and reoccur with the start of every MER, whether with breastfeeding, expressing or with spontaneous releases. Many sufferers keep the problem to themselves preferring the weaning of their baby to being incorrectly labeled as depressed or victims of abuse. Upon experiencing D-MER mothers are initially convinced the problem is physiological and not psychological, and they are correct.

As both a lactation consultant and a sufferer of D-MER, I first named and identified D-MER over 10 years ago. Now, through the case studies that have been done, collaboration with other medical and breastfeeding care providers, and the collection of information from the anecdotal reports from over 1,000 mothers, there is now a foundation of understanding of D-MER. Though the evidence base for D-MER is still mainly unestablished at this time, there are many professionals always working to bring evidenced-based information to the study of human lactation. This is exactly what the slow work and understanding of D-MER is about; the process of bringing new information into the light for further research and understanding.

In the PowerPoint presentation that I have to present, I discuss how D-MER presents, its tell-tale manifestation, and its spectrum and intensities. The presentation also explains the currently proposed mechanism of the MER anomaly, how health care providers can identify a mother it D-MER and how to help and support mothers with the condition.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More

An advocate for women, Jodi Hall has dedicated herself to understanding the impact of traumatic events on the childbearing years, and toward creating solutions designed to change lives. Jodi shares her knowledge on topics related to trauma in the lives of mothers through workshops and training sessions for healthcare professionals, counsellors and social service workers throughout the world.
Jodi has worked as a doula since 1995, and a woman’s abuse counsellor where Jodi gained experience working directly with women experiencing abuse.  It is through years of sharing spaces with women experiencing abuse, that Jodi’s much sought after way of ‘being with’ women was nurtured.

Jodi Hall holds a PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences from the University of Western Ontario.  Jodi has been instrumental in various research studies on marginalized women’s access to services that promote health. She resides with her family in London, Ontario, where she co-runs a private counseling practice with Amanda Saunders, MSW, RSW and Holly Gibson, MSW, RSW, who are also skilled birth workers, called Sharing Spaces.

Abstract:

Health care professionals supporting women during the transition to mothering play an essential role in creating safer spaces to inquire about potential abuse. However, many health professionals are reluctant to routinely and universally inquire about abuse in pregnancy and the postpartum period, even though there is widespread recognition that abuse has devastating physical and emotional effects on the lives of women and their children with particular vulnerabilities during the transition to mothering. Research and experiential evidence suggests that pregnant women with histories of abuse want caregivers who are sensitive and responsive to their needs, know how to respond to disclosures of abuse, and are knowledgeable about services that could offer support. This workshop will provide a starting place to explore the nuances of creating safer spaces for women survivors of abuse, and some strategies to respond to disclosures.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
United States Marion Rice, Ed.D., IBCLC

Dr. Rice  has been working at the intersection of education and health for social justice and public good.  She is the former Executive Director of the Breastfeeding Coalition of Oregon.  Currently,  Dr. Rice works on organizational development, communication, marketing, public policy and community engagement to advance health equity through access to donor human milk.  A national thought leader, she is deeply engaged in convening conversations about the importance of maintaining women’s biological integrity, advancing feminist approaches to human milk banking and at the same time, encouraging capacity building for human milk derived therapies improving health outcomes for the most vulnerable babies .

 

Most recently Dr. Rice provided consulting as a Policy Associate with Mothers' Milk Bank of San Jose and has provided strategy and policy consulting for the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA). Marion holds a doctorate in Education Leadership and is an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant, IBCLC.

United States Marion Rice, Ed.D., IBCLC
Abstract:

This session will look at how for profit corporations are seeking to aggregate, control and exploit human milk. In the absence of federal health policy and consumer regulation/protection, companies are emerging seeking to build commercial markets for human milk often under the guise of improving the economic status of women and infant health.
We will examine companies currently paying for milk both domestically and internationally and the implications for women and emerging policy both at the federal and state level.
Entities setting a price for human milk in the absence of supportive public policy may in fact undermine women’s biological integrity, infant health and contribute to the vulnerability of women and babies.
I will ask participants to consider the issues and to support models of community engagement and decision making that are women centered and women led that keep this biologically critical substance within the community from where it comes; supporting breastfeeding and benefiting women and babies.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC

Jo Gilpin is a Registered Nurse, Midwife and has worked for many years as a Child Health Nurse with the Child and Family Health Service in South Australia (CaFHS). During this time she completed a Graduate Diploma in Health Counselling. She also studied Infant Mental Health at the University of South Australia. She became an IBCLC in 1996.
Her passion throughout has been educating, encouraging and supporting parents to have successful, enjoyable, breastfeeding relationships with their babies. This has been the main focus of her work.
She has worked privately as a Lactation Consultant since 2005. She has published two books, both on breastfeeding. Her most recent is 'Brilliant Breastfeeding: A Sensible Guide'. This was published in October 2018. This book aims to sensitively guide parents and future parents towards fulfilling breastfeeding relationships with up-to-date, evidence-based information. Attention is paid to the many challenges that parents face.
Jo loves what she does and never considers it 'work'. She lives with her husband on Kangaroo Island, which is just off the southern coast of South Australia. Her children and five grandchildren live in Sydney and Brisbane.

Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC
Abstract:

A baby’s birth can have a significant impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Medical intervention in normal birthing situations is rife, and globally cesarean rates have soared since 2000. Along with this, breastfeeding rates are less than ideal. A mother who feels a sense of grief about the birth of her baby is consequently more likely to face breastfeeding challenges. IBCLC’s, midwives and medical officers will often begin a breastfeeding consultation by listening to a mother’s unhappy perception of her baby’s birth. This aspect needs to be sensitively supported.

It is high time we take stock and pay more attention to what world health authorities are recommending to improve birthing and thus breastfeeding outcomes. These outcomes can affect a mother’s feelings of empowerment, her physical and mental health. Baby’s health and general development are statistically better when breastfed. There are significant financial savings made by reducing costs in various countries health systems when mothers breastfeed successfully.

There are definite changes we can make, following recommended guidelines and recent research. We can do this individually in our work and also in our affiliations with professional bodies by supporting and encouraging government policymakers and advocacy groups. These are our future challenges.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.