GOLD Learning Speakers

U.S.A.

Sarah McNamee, LCSW, MBA, IMH-E® Mentor (Clinical)

  • Speaker Type: Preventing and Healing Trauma in the Perinatal Period Lecture Pack
  • Country: U.S.A.
Biography:

Sarah McNamee is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and endorsed as an Infant Mental Health Mentor (Clinical). She is the Director/Owner of McNamee & Associates, LLC, a company that specializes in infant and early childhood mental health and supports families, communities, and providers through direct service, consultation, supervision/mentoring, and training. Sarah’s specialties include infant/early childhood mental health (with a focus on supporting families with baby/young child born premature, babies and young children with special health care needs, and highly sensitive babies/young children/parents), supporting infant regulation, reflective practice, and the provision of reflective supervision/consultation. Sarah is passionate about co-creating spaces that welcome the inherent wisdom and strength of individuals and communities in a trauma-informed and culturally responsive way. It is in these spaces that we discover the best tools we have for supporting individuals and communities, as well as changing our systems of care for babies, young children, and families. Sarah is the parent to three beautifully amazing and challenging human beings who continue to teach her the true meaning of intentional, attuned, and responsive caregiving.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
“How You Are Is as Important as What You Do”: The Importance of Reflective Practice in Providing Trauma-Informed Care
"Grounded in the concept that “how you are is as important in what you do"" (Pawl & St. John, 1998), this presentation will allow participants the chance to learn about and engage in reflective practice. Reflective practice is the discipline of regularly “stepping back” to consider the meaning of what has transpired in relationships, and to examine one’s professional and personal responses to these interactions for the purpose of determining further action. (Emde, et al., 2001) Best practice suggests that by consistently engaging in reflective practice, we are better equipped to do our work in a relationship-based, trauma-informed, culturally responsive way. Our time together will begin with the exploration of the possible ways in which stress and dysregulation (as well as regulation) show up in our bodies, our work, and in our lives. Through the use of didactic instruction and experiential exercises, we will then spend time learning about and utilizing reflective practice to better understand how to best support our regulation and strengthen the connections we build with others including the parents and babies we serve. "