GOLD Learning Speakers

Canada

Jillian Vinall, PhD

  • Speaker Type: Pain Management in the NICU Lecture Pack 2019
  • Country: Canada
Biography:

I am currently a Postdoctoral Scholar co-supervised by Dr. Melanie Noel (Psychologist and Assistant Professor in Psychology, University of Calgary) and Dr. Nivez Rasic (Anesthesiologist and Clinical Lead of the Vi Riddell Children’s Pain & Rehabilitation Program, Alberta Children’s Hospital) in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the University of Calgary, Alberta Canada. In 2015, I completed a PhD in Neuroscience at the University of British Columbia under the supervision of Dr. Ruth Grunau (Psychologist and Professor in Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia) and Dr. Steven Miller (Head of Neurology at the Hospital for Sick Children, and Professor in Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario). I have been studying pediatric pain in both healthy and clinical populations for over a decade. I have experience and expertise in both acute and chronic pain, and the transitions in-between, from infancy through to early adulthood.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Long-Term Effects of Neonatal Pain on the Developing Brain
As part of their lifesaving care, infants born very preterm (8 to 16 weeks too early) undergo repeated invasive procedures for what can be weeks to months on end. There is accumulating evidence demonstrating the negative long-term effects of repeated neonatal pain on the developing brain and neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born very preterm. The presentation will outline why infants born ≤32 weeks gestational age, are particularly vulnerable to repeated exposure to invasive procedures. I will highlight the latest literature exploring the long-term effects of neonatal pain on the brain and neurodevelopmental outcomes of both children born very preterm and animal models of prematurity. Furthermore, I will discuss evidence-based pain prevention and intervention strategies applied during neonatal intensive care. It is imperative that we continue to find ways to reduce the negative long-term effects of pain within this vulnerable population of infants born very-preterm.
Accreditation, Main Category
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: