GOLD Learning Speakers

Australia

Rhea Dempsey, TPTC, CBE, Grad. Dip. Counselling.

  • Speaker Type: GOLD Perinatal 2019
  • Country: Australia
Biography:

Rhea’s Dempsey’s understanding of birth has been gained over four decades working with pregnant and birthing women, their partners, support people, midwives, doulas and medical practitioners in home and hospital settings.

Rhea has presented locally, nationally and internationally She is recognized as an insightful commentator on the difficulties women, who have a yearning for normal birth, face in navigating contemporary birth culture. She is also respected as one of Australia’s foremost thinkers on the topic of working with pain in childbirth and its connection to normal physiological birth. Her book Birth with Confidence: savvy choices for normal birth, explores these issues and maps out a path to powerful birthing experiences and she is presently working on a new book exploring the deeper emotional and psychological dynamics impacting birthing potential.

Rhea's second book is due out in November, titled Beyond the Birth Plan: Getting real about Pain and Power. Amongst other topics it will be addressing this issue of psychological birth trauma.

She is the mother of three adult daughters, and grandmother of four delicious grandchildren – so far.


CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Birth Debriefing: The How and Why at the Bedside
Making meaning through telling stories appears part of our deep human DNA. Sharing birth stories honours this capacity. Birth debriefing however honours a more urgent therapeutic need. When we understand that the reported prevalence of birth trauma ranges from 33 to 45 percent, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects between 1.5 to 6 percent of birthing women, we understand the need for birth debriefing. A 2018 international review on ‘what matters to women during childbirth’ found that most women – wanted a physiological labour and birth; a healthy baby; practical and emotional support from birth companions, and competent, reassuring, kind clinical staff; if intervention was needed or wanted, women wanted to retain a sense of personal achievement and control through active decision-making. 2019 Australian research amplifies these findings, reporting that women repeatedly referred to their preference to avoid intervention, but described being unable to do so in hospital. So before addressing birth debriefing, it’s necessary to understand the context within which birth debriefing becomes necessary. In this presentation I will explore common pathways to birth trauma – necessary interventions and medical emergencies; unmet expectations of care and the impact of any previous vulnerabilities experienced by the birthing woman. Then we will explore the structural changes required to address the issue of birth trauma. Finally, we will explore the ‘how and why of birth debriefing at the bedside’.
Presentations: 15  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 1 (details)  |  Categories: