GOLD Learning Speakers

USA

Sherry LeBlanc, NNP

  • Speaker Type: ABM Conference 2016
  • Country: USA
Biography:

Sherry LeBlanc has been a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in the Newborn Critical Care Center at UNC Children’s Hospital, a 58 bed, level IV unit, since 2008. She earned her Bachelors of Science in Nursing at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Masters of Science in Nursing at Duke University. Sherry is the Morbidity Coordinator for the Newborn Critical Care Center, and her interest in hypoglycemia grew from an M&M topic. She created and is currently the Chair of the Hypoglycemia Taskforce, an interdisciplinary team that provides guidelines for newborns at risk for hypoglycemia at UNC Hospitals. Sherry also developed and serves as Co-Chair of the Prenatal Diabetes Education Committee, which strives to educate mothers with diabetes, and empowers them to help their newborn. Currently, she is the PI of Eliminating Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia NCCC Admissions and in planning phase for a multicenter RCT regarding hypoglycemia.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
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Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Reducing Intensive Care Admissions for Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia
Neonatal hypoglycemia often requires intensive care, resulting in mother infant separation, decreased breastfeeding and associated consequences. Frequent hypoglycemia admissions to the Newborn Critical Care Center at the University of North Carolina Children's Hospital often did not require IV dextrose, and therefore unnecessarily separated the mother/infant dyad. A hypoglycemia bundle that placed greater emphasis on early feeding and universal skin to skin care for infants at risk for hypoglycemia was implemented as these measures may prevent hypoglycemia. The bundle also included protocol revision. The aim was to decrease intensive care admission for asymptomatic hypoglycemia. NICU admissions for asymptomatic hypoglycemia decreased by 10%, process measures of skin to skin care and early breastfeeding improved. Infants admitted to intensive care that did not receive IV dextrose decreased from 10 infants to 1 between the control group and post-intervention groups. There were no negative outcomes.
Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Reducing Intensive Care Admissions for Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia
Neonatal hypoglycemia often requires intensive care, resulting in mother infant separation, decreased breastfeeding and associated consequences. Frequent hypoglycemia admissions to the Newborn Critical Care Center at the University of North Carolina Children's Hospital often did not require IV dextrose, and therefore unnecessarily separated the mother/infant dyad. A hypoglycemia bundle that placed greater emphasis on early feeding and universal skin to skin care for infants at risk for hypoglycemia was implemented as these measures may prevent hypoglycemia. The bundle also included protocol revision. The aim was to decrease intensive care admission for asymptomatic hypoglycemia. NICU admissions for asymptomatic hypoglycemia decreased by 10%, process measures of skin to skin care and early breastfeeding improved. Infants admitted to intensive care that did not receive IV dextrose decreased from 10 infants to 1 between the control group and post-intervention groups. There were no negative outcomes.
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation