GOLD Learning Speakers

USA

Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC

  • Speaker Type: ABM Conference 2016
  • Country: USA
Biography:

Laurie Nommsen-Rivers has been a Registered Dietitian since 1990 and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) since 1993. Laurie served as the Associate Editor of the Journal of Human Lactation from 1997- 2006. Laurie received her master’s degree in Nutrition from UC Davis, after which she worked with hundreds of breastfeeding mother-infant dyads during her 18 years as a research associate with Kathryn Dewey. Motivated by a desire to advance the field of human lactation, Laurie returned to the University of California in 2004 to obtain a PhD in epidemiology. Between 2009 and 2016 Laurie was an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Neonatology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Since September of this year she is an Associate Professor of Nutrition, and the Ruth Rosevear Endowed Chair of Maternal and Child Nutrition, at the University of Cincinnati. She has co-authored over 70 research publications related to the breastfeeding dyad with a focus on barriers that impede lactation success.

CE Library Presentation(s) Available Online:
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Milk Production in Mothers with and without Signs of Insulin Resistance
Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD; Sarah Riddle1, MD; Amy Thompson2, MD; Laura Ward1, MD; and Erin Wagner1, MS. 1Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and 2University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio Background: Maternal obesity is associated with shortened breastfeeding duration. Insulin resistance is a physiologic hallmark of obesity and may underlie lactation difficulties. Objective: Our objective is to compare 24-hour milk production in mothers with signs of insulin resistance (IR) versus those without. Methods: We examined baseline data from the MALMS study, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of metformin to augment low milk supply. Baseline eligibility includes: mother 1-8 weeks postpartum, healthy term infant, and currently supplementing, but strong desire to achieve exclusive breastfeeding. At baseline, all women record 24 hour milk production and are evaluated for the following signs of IR: fasting plasma glucose > 95 mg/dL, abdominal obesity, recent gestational diabetes, or polycystic ovary syndrome. We compared baseline 24-hour milk production in IR versus no IR groups, and then in obese versus non-obese groups. Results: 33 (69%) exhibited signs of IR and 15 had no IR signs. Mean age (+SD) of mother (31+5 years) and infant (4+2 weeks) did not differ between groups, but BMI was significantly higher in the IR group (36.9+7.9 versus 25.4+3.6 kg/m2, P
Presentations: 22  |  Hours / CE Credits: 13.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation
Watch Today!
View Lecture
Note: Currently only available through a bundled series of lectures
Milk Production in Mothers with and without Signs of Insulin Resistance
Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD; Sarah Riddle1, MD; Amy Thompson2, MD; Laura Ward1, MD; and Erin Wagner1, MS. 1Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and 2University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio Background: Maternal obesity is associated with shortened breastfeeding duration. Insulin resistance is a physiologic hallmark of obesity and may underlie lactation difficulties. Objective: Our objective is to compare 24-hour milk production in mothers with signs of insulin resistance (IR) versus those without. Methods: We examined baseline data from the MALMS study, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of metformin to augment low milk supply. Baseline eligibility includes: mother 1-8 weeks postpartum, healthy term infant, and currently supplementing, but strong desire to achieve exclusive breastfeeding. At baseline, all women record 24 hour milk production and are evaluated for the following signs of IR: fasting plasma glucose > 95 mg/dL, abdominal obesity, recent gestational diabetes, or polycystic ovary syndrome. We compared baseline 24-hour milk production in IR versus no IR groups, and then in obese versus non-obese groups. Results: 33 (69%) exhibited signs of IR and 15 had no IR signs. Mean age (+SD) of mother (31+5 years) and infant (4+2 weeks) did not differ between groups, but BMI was significantly higher in the IR group (36.9+7.9 versus 25.4+3.6 kg/m2, P
Hours / CE Credits: 0.25 (details)  |  Categories: Breastfeeding and Lactation