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Equity and Safer Infant Feeding in Times of Disaster and Civil Unrest

by Lourdes M. Santaballa Mora, IBCLC, IYCFS, BA
  • Duration: 60 Mins
  • Credits: 1 CERP, 1 L-CERP, 1 CNE, 1 CME, 0.1 Midwifery CEU, 1 Dietetic CEU
  • Handout: No
Abstract:

In times of civil instability and changing global climate, we risk natural disasters, infrastructure failure, terrorist situation, police brutality, mass migration, chemical accident, war or other type of emergencies. Infants and young children under the age of 2 are the most vulnerable due to their dependence on adults for survival and their delicate physiology. We know that lactation in emergencies saves lives, yet the unrest that occurs in the days immediately after the disaster may contribute to premature weaning. At the same time, many babies are not breast or chestfed at all or only partially. This session will explore the methods to preserve breastfeeding, decrease the use of formula and other human milk substitutes, promote relactation, and teach appropriate complementary feeding in a disaster appropriate, low tech and resource limited environment. We will also discuss the colonial and patriarchal of humanitarian relief and how to make equity our focal point.

Learning Objectives:

Objective 1: Identify the unique feeding needs and risks of infants and young children and their parents following a disaster situation;

Objective 2: Incorporate low technology interventions and feeding techniques, focusing on preserving or augmenting lactation or reducing risk with substitute feeding for families affected by the lack of resources including utilities and equipment; and

Objective 3: Develop intervention techniques that emphasize equity, linguistically and culturally appropriate services, local community identified initiatives and resources, and the rejection colonial models of humanitarian intervention.


Categories:
Presentations: 29  |  Hours / CE Credits: 27.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks