GOLD Lactation Online Conference 2020

The GOLD Lactation Online Conference is the largest Annual Breastfeeding Conference in the world. Packed full of fascinating topics such as supporting families who are exclusively pumping, oxidation vs high lipase action in human milk, supporting the weaning process, persistent pain during breastfeeding, marijuana and breastfeeding, risk based language, normal infant feeding patterns and so much more!

Join speakers such as Annie Frisbie, Bryna Sampey, Carlos González, Chauntel Norris, Divya S. Parikh, Dixie Whetsell, Lisa Gonzales, Duncan Fisher, Jessie Young, Jo Gilpin, Juanita Jauer Steichen, Katrien Irena Nauwelaerts, Lucy Ruddle, Mariana Colmenares Castaño, Mona Liza Hamlin, Nikki Hunter Greenaway, Paulina Erices, Philip Anderson, Paulina Erices, Vanessa Simmons, Lucy Ruddle, Melissa Cole, Christy Jo Hendricks, Michelle Branco, Rebecca LR Powell, Robinson Reed, Sejal Fichadia, Sharon L Unger, Sonia Semenic, Ted Greiner, Tomoko Seo, Wilaiporn Rojjanasrirat and so many other amazing minds with thought-provoking topics to expand your knowledge and skills with the 2020 GOLD Lactation Conference!

It is an excellent resource suitable for all skill levels and is a perfect fit for IBCLCs, Lactation Consultants, Nurses, Lactation Educators, Breastfeeding Counselors, Mother to Mother (Peer to Peer) Support Workers, Midwives, Physicians, Dietitians, Doulas, Childbirth Educators and anyone else working or studying within the maternal-child health industry. Explore the latest research, trends, new ideas and hot topics in the world of human lactation.

$265.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 32.50   Access Time: 8 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (32):
Durations: 60 mins
Breastfeeding with Insufficient Glandular Tissue

Mariana Colmenares Castaño was born in Mexico City, and from an early age she was fascinated by animals and nature. She studied medicine at the National University of Mexico (UNAM), and found her passion as a pediatrician doing her residency at the National Pediatric Institute. With the birth of her first child, Mariana witnessed the lack of knowledge and commitment with breastfeeding and nutrition within the medical profession. This was her impetus to specialize in breastfeeding medicine. Certified as a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2011 by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE), she is currently a member of the International Lactation Consultant Association, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and a proud founding member of the National Lactation Consultant Association of Mexico (ACCLAM), where she served on the Board of Directors as Education Coordinator (2014-2019). Regional coordinator for the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine for the Región of LATAM (2018 to date) and an in coming board member 2019-2022. As part of her continuing professional training she studied at the International Breastfeeding Clinic, in Toronto CA.

Mariana is a member of the team for Breastfeeding Country Index BFCI, a project from Yale University and Universidad Iberoamericana whose goal is to develop an evidence base metric that can help decision-makers to understand the current status to elevate breastfeeding programs and increase breastfeeding rates. A frequent speaker at national and international conferences (plenary speaker at ILCA 2018), she has published numerous articles and co-authored a chapter for the National Academy of Medicine. To contribute to a medical profession better prepared to support breastfeeding, she teaches medical students at the National University of México and serves as a consultant for the National Health Institute and UNICEF.

Objective 1: Describe the theoretical framework that can give us useful information for a timely and appropriate diagnosis of Insufficient Glandular Tissue;

Objective 2: Demonstrate and support the best way possible for the dyad to achieve a healthful breastfeeding experience;

Objective 3: Apply useful tools that can help achieve the personal goals

Abstract:

Breastfeeding is the normative way to feed babies all over the world. We have access to a large amount of scientific evidence that supports it. Advocates of breastfeeding such as health care professionals that protect, promote and support the breast/chest feeding dyad can struggle sometimes with women or babies who cannot breastfeed as the World Health Organization suggests. Mothers with low milk supply are often supported by family, friends and health care with well meaning advice and remedies to help them do their best. Women who have insufficient glandular tissue (IGT) struggle with their milk supply, despite good breastfeeding management. It is common to see families with this issue during their second or third lactation failure without really understanding what might be going wrong. These babies can have dehydration in the neonatal period, hypernatremia or even death without anybody that could help with a correct diagnosis or help with achievable goals that can benefit both mother and baby. It is of great importance to help with accurate diagnosis that can also benefit psychologically and can help parents choose to continue breastfeeding with breast/ chest supplementation.

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Durations: 60 mins
Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC
The Ethics of Digital Privacy and Lactation Practice
United States Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC

Annie Frisbie has been an IBCLC in private practice since 2011. Her background is in media, where she worked very closely with producers, content developers, and tech thought leaders on business strategy, content development, contracts, legal clearances, and more. She has also produced training for professional media software solutions as well as created and managed print and video content for media professionals.
In 2018 she was honored with the US Lactation Consultant Association's President's Award, "awarding those that demonstrate extraordinary service to the association and profession."
She is a produced screenwriter and proud member of the Writers Guild of America, East. She have a BA from Franklin and Marshall College, and an MA in Cinema Studies from New York University. In a previous life I was a film critic. I live with my husband and our two children in Queens, New York.

Objective 1: Define privacy as a general concept and as it applies to access and handling of digital information and describe the most common threats to privacy in the digital space. Includes comparison of large-scale global approaches to digital privacy, including HIPAA, GDPR, PIPEDA, and other national and regional legislative efforts.;

Objective 2: Explain why protecting digital privacy is both an ethical obligation and a key element of improving equity in the healthcare space and demonstrate the common ways in which health care providers may put patient/client privacy at risk, along with the consequences to both patient and health care provider.;

Objective 3: List specific action items that can be implemented immediately to protect the digital privacy of patients/clients.

United States Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC
Abstract:

As healthcare providers incorporate technological solutions into their practices, they also face the increasingly complex task of protecting the privacy of their patients/clients. Some countries have laws in place that healthcare providers need to understand and follow, but all healthcare providers regardless of practice setting have an ethical responsibility to maintain rigorous standards when it comes to digital privacy.

Because technology changes so rapidly, keeping up-to-date with privacy regulations proves challenging for both large institutions and solo practitioners. Lactation must also be concerned with the privacy of more than one entity while serving a patient base that may have already faced numerous privacy and consent violations during pregnancy and childbirth. By valuing the privacy of lactating persons and their children, legal, ethical, and moral obligations can be met, enhancing client/patient autonomy and improving self-efficacy.

This session provides a framework for understanding digital privacy and privacy threats, and offers resources for implementing policies and procedures that protect patient/client privacy.

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Durations: 60 mins
Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA
Breastfeeding and The Use Of Herbs
Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA

Katrien Nauwelaerts works as a history-teacher since 2000 and graduated as a prehistoric archaeologist in 2005. She's the mother of three breastfed children and the administrator of the Dutch breastfeeding-website Borstvoeding Aardig, http://borstvoeding.aardig.be.

Katrien worked as a volunteer breastfeeding-counsellor, provincial coordinator and training manager for the Belgian breastfeeding-organisation Borstvoeding vzw between 2010-2014. In 2013 she became an IBCLC. Since than she's working as a lactation consultant and a nutritionist in private practice at the non-profit organisation Aardig Levenvzw.

Katrien often works with natural parents who choose for attachment parenting. She's doing research on full-term breastfeeding and is the administrator of a Dutch mothergroup for full-term breastfeeding-mothers on Facebook. Working with teenage mothers it's often on internet forums or in collaboration with the Public Centre for Social Welfare and municipality Herenthout, with the aim of supporting
disadvantaged families.

Objective 1: Compare the difference between the regular medical approach of breastfeeding problems and the more holistic solutions used in fytotherapy;

Objective 2: Explain how the use of herbs can support and sometimes even replace the more traditional clinical treatment of breastfeeding problems;

Objective 3: Describe the holistic approach of traditional breastfeeding problems.

Belgium Katrien Nauwelaerts, IBCLC, BA, MA
Abstract:

The medical use of herbs is as old as mankind. In this lecture IBCLC and herborist Katrien Nauwelaerts explains the difference between the regular medical approach of breastfeeding problems and the more holistic solutions used in phytotherapy. Katrien Nauwelaerts explains how the use of herbs can support and sometimes even replace the more traditional clinical treatment of breastfeeding problems such as postpartum depression, low milk supply, oversupply, engorgement, breast infection, plugged ducts, mastitis, candidiasis, thrush, and Raynaud Syndrome etc.

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Durations: 60 mins
Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)
Nursing A Preemie, Perspectives For Lactation Supporters and Professionals
United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)

Paulina Erices is a bilingual (Spanish) International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in private practice and a Maternal Child Health Specialist for Jefferson County Public Health in Colorado. She holds a BS in Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University and a MS in Organizational Leadership from the University of Denver. Paulina is the coordinator for Adelante, the Latino Network for Health and Education and participates in several workgroups focused on child and family health, including the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership, the NICU Consortium, and the Community Leaders in Health Equity. Her areas of current work include providing direct service to families with babies who have been in the NICU and/or have other medical conditions; promoting maternal and infant mental health along the continuum of care; building community capacity to navigate health and education systems as well as influence program development/delivery; and establishing community-based participatory lactation programs to meet the needs of diverse communities. Paulina 's goal is to elevate the voices and influence of community members to effectively improve systems of care.

Objective 1: Identify opportunities and challenges to establish lactation in the NICU; ;

Objective 2: Analyze the role of feedings in the context of infant development and parental role attainment;;

Objective 3: Identify strategies to support lactation for families with children with special needs and in a variety of contexts.

United States Paulina Erices, MS, IBCLC, IMH-E (r)
Abstract:

In this presentation participants will learn about parents’ experiences with feedings in the NICU and continuation of lactation after going home, the importance of parent-child mutual-regulation and its implication in feeding success, strategies for lactation professionals to support the nursing relationship, and infant mental health concepts in relationship to feeding.

This presentation will include qualitative and quantitative data to broaden participants understanding of the context of lactation with a premature baby or a baby with special medical conditions. The participants will also receive information about multidisciplinary approaches and initiatives to support families with preemie babies.

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Durations: 60 mins
Medication Use During Breastfeeding

Philip O. Anderson, Pharm.D., FCSHP, FASHP is a Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at the UCSD Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences where he heads the course on drug information.
Dr. Anderson has lectured and published extensively on drug use during breastfeeding including in professional journals and textbooks, including original research on drug excretion into breastmilk. Dr. Anderson founded the LactMed® database, which is part of the National Library of Medicine’s Bookshelf. He continues to write LactMed® records and to expand the database. He has authored the medication appendix to the popular handbook, The Nursing Mothers' Companion. Dr. Anderson is the Pharmacology Editor of the professional journal, Breastfeeding Medicine, and writes a monthly column on medication use during breastfeeding for the journal. He has also been a consultant to the US Food and Drug Administration on the topic of drug labeling with respect to use during lactation.

Objective 1: List 3 factors that increase infant impact of a drug in milk;

Objective 2: List 3 strategies to minimize infant intake of drugs in milk;

Objective 3: List the infant age range of greatest risk for drug ingestion while nursing.

Abstract:

Many mothers do not breastfeed their infants, discontinue breastfeeding or fail to take medications while they are breastfeeding. The principles of drug passage into breast milk are well established, although not well known by many health professionals. This presentation will review the principles of drug passage into breast milk, medications and factors that can cause a risk for adverse reactions in breastfed infants and discuss how to choose the most appropriate medications for mothers who are breastfeeding their infants.

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Durations: 60 mins
Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC
Birth and Breastfeeding Outcomes
Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC

Jo Gilpin is a Registered Nurse, Midwife and has worked for many years as a Child Health Nurse with the Child and Family Health Service in South Australia (CaFHS). During this time she completed a Graduate Diploma in Health Counselling. She also studied Infant Mental Health at the University of South Australia. She became an IBCLC in 1996.
Her passion throughout has been educating, encouraging and supporting parents to have successful, enjoyable, breastfeeding relationships with their babies. This has been the main focus of her work.
She has worked privately as a Lactation Consultant since 2005. She has published two books, both on breastfeeding. Her most recent is 'Brilliant Breastfeeding: A Sensible Guide'. This was published in October 2018. This book aims to sensitively guide parents and future parents towards fulfilling breastfeeding relationships with up-to-date, evidence-based information. Attention is paid to the many challenges that parents face.
Jo loves what she does and never considers it 'work'. She lives with her husband on Kangaroo Island, which is just off the southern coast of South Australia. Her children and five grandchildren live in Sydney and Brisbane.

Objective 1: Describe ways women can get the very best information about their labor and birth options, particularly the advantages and of natural birth where possible;

Objective 2: Demonstrate awareness of the outcomes for mother and baby when medical interventions during labor and delivery are used unnecessarily;

Objective 3: Explain the relevance to breastfeeding longevity and success by mother and baby having skin-to-skin contact as soon as possible after baby's birth.

Australia Jo Gilpin, RM CHN IBCLC
Abstract:

A baby’s birth can have a significant impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Medical intervention in normal birthing situations is rife, and globally cesarean rates have soared since 2000. Along with this, breastfeeding rates are less than ideal. A mother who feels a sense of grief about the birth of her baby is consequently more likely to face breastfeeding challenges. IBCLC’s, midwives and medical officers will often begin a breastfeeding consultation by listening to a mother’s unhappy perception of her baby’s birth. This aspect needs to be sensitively supported.

It is high time we take stock and pay more attention to what world health authorities are recommending to improve birthing and thus breastfeeding outcomes. These outcomes can affect a mother’s feelings of empowerment, her physical and mental health. Baby’s health and general development are statistically better when breastfed. There are significant financial savings made by reducing costs in various countries health systems when mothers breastfeed successfully.

There are definite changes we can make, following recommended guidelines and recent research. We can do this individually in our work and also in our affiliations with professional bodies by supporting and encouraging government policymakers and advocacy groups. These are our future challenges.

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Durations: 60 mins
When Supply is Greater than Demand: Maternal Hyperlactation Syndrome

Divya Sinha Parikh MD, IBCLC, FAAP is a board certified pediatrician practicing in Columbus, OH. She received her medical training at The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and completed her residency in general pediatrics at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital at Case Western Reserve University. She formerly served on the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Committee at MetroHealth Hospital Systems in Cleveland, OH and created a breastfeeding medicine clinical rotation during residency. Within her practice, she has extensive experience managing lactation concerns and has taken a special interest in mentoring current and aspiring breastfeeding providers. She has presented her work at local and national meetings.

Objective 1: Define and explain the pathophysiology behind hyperlactation;

Objective 2: List the negative consequences of hyperlactation;

Objective 3: Demonstrate basic management of hyperlactation and indications for referral for medical evaluation.

Abstract:

The objectives of this lecture are to understand the definition, pathophysiology, and basic management of hyperlactation. Topics discussed will include proposed mechanisms leading to hyperlactation, health effects on mother and baby, and approach to diagnosis and management. Participants will learn key history and physical findings for hyperlactation, behavioral interventions to reduce milk supply, herbal and medical interventions to reduce milk supply, and will learn how to determine which dyads would benefit from medical intervention.

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Durations: 60 mins
Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC
Lisa Gonzales, BSN, RN, IBCLC
Lactation Anaphylaxis: A Case Study
United States Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC
       Lisa Gonzales, BSN, RN, IBCLC

Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC, has a Master’s Degree in Community Health Education from the University of Oregon. She began working with breastfeeding families in 1992 and became an IBCLC in 1998. She has worked as a lactation consultant in a variety of settings including private practice, county and state public health programs and high risk maternal and pediatric hospitals. She began teaching lactation training courses in 2003 and is currently an adjunct faculty member teaching in the Pathway 2 Lactation Training Program in the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health at Portland State University. She is a past presenter for the GOLD Perinatal Conference. She is an active member of the Oregon Washington Lactation Association, the US Lactation Consultant Association and the International Lactation Consultant Association. She was a founding Board Member for Northwest Mothers Milk Bank, a HMBANA non-profit donor milk bank.

Lisa Gonzales, BSN, RN, IBCLC earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Linfield College. She started her nursing career as a Labor and Delivery nurse at a Level III OB hospital in 2006. After having her first baby, Lisa pursued lactation education and became an IBCLC in 2013. She made full career change in 2015 to become a lactation nurse in a high risk maternity and pediatric hospital, providing inpatient and outpatient consults to growing families. She is an active member of the Oregon Washington Lactation Association, the US Lactation Consultant Association and the International Lactation Consultant Association. Lisa currently helps families during in-home visits with her private practice.

Objective 1: Define what lactation anaphylaxis is, what the common symptoms are and when it is most likely to occur;

Objective 2: Describe common treatments for this condition and options for long-term medical management of this condition;

Objective 3: Discuss how this condition can impact the breastfeeding relationship and how an IBCLC can best support a breastfeeding parent that experiences this condition.

United States Dixie Whetsell, MS, IBCLC
       Lisa Gonzales, BSN, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

This case describes a 32-year-old primiparous woman who experienced an anaphylactic reaction associated with breastfeeding and milk expression on postpartum day four. With each episode her symptoms worsened and she developed hives, edema and difficulty breathing and swallowing. She had to be treated for her anaphylactic reaction in a hospital ER and ICU and she was released on postpartum day five on antihistamines.

Lactation anaphylaxis is a very rare condition that was first reported in the scientific literature in 1991. Since then there have been 11 other reported cases. Lactation anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and symptoms can include a rash, hives, edema resulting in difficulty breathing or swallowing, a dangerous decrease in blood pressure and a loss of consciousness. We will review this case and do a brief review of the previous case reports. We will discuss the possible causes for lactation anaphylaxis, the related risk factors, common treatments and possible breastfeeding outcomes. In most cases with proper treatment and management breastfeeding and milk expression can continue. Enhanced awareness of and knowledge about this rare condition will allow lactation consultants and other members of the health care team to better support breastfeeding parents who experience lactation anaphylaxis.

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Durations: 60 mins
Ted Greiner, PhD (International Nutrition)
Alcohol Consumption During Lactation
Brazil Ted Greiner, PhD (International Nutrition)

Ted Greiner received a PhD in nutrition for developing countries from Cornell University. For 19 years he worked as nutrition advisor for the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, based at Uppsala University where he was Associate Professor of International Child Health, helping to ensure their long-term support for IBFAN and WABA. Dr. Greiner was Professor of Nutrition at Hanyang University in South Korea for seven years. He has consulted for UNICEF, World Bank, FAO and others. He is now retired and edits the journal World Nutrition. He has lived in 8 countries and worked in 10 more. His areas of research expertise include infant feeding and programs to combat vitamin A, iron and iodine deficiency. In the 1970s, he did the first scientific work on the impact of baby food advertising on breastfeeding patterns. His PhD dissertation was on the planning and evaluation of a 1978-81 project to protect, support and promote breastfeeding in Yemen (terminology quickly adopted by UN agencies). Over the next decades, the duration of breastfeeding there doubled. During the planning the Innocenti meeting, he represented Sida, one of the 4 agencies involved. He was active in changing how WHO viewed HIV and infant feeding. He has over 100 breastfeeding-related publications.

Delegates will be able to:

1: Discuss the scientific literature on alcohol's effects on breastfeeding and ways in which alcohol exposure may affect infants
2: Rate the quality of advice on alcohol consumption during breastfeeding by health professionals and organizations
3: Interpret the scientific literature on this and other issues


Brazil Ted Greiner, PhD (International Nutrition)
Abstract:

Moderate alcohol use by breastfeeding women appears to be relatively common. Alcohol concentrates in breast milk at levels similar to maternal blood, peaking at 30-60. Most studies find no link with the duration of breastfeeding. However, seven studies have found a link with a shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Alcohol affects oxytocin release, leading to reductions in breast milk consumption in the following hours and reduces infant sleep, both temporary if the mother does not continue to drink. These effects on the infant and the breastfeeding process could be interpreted by mothers as signs of infant dissatisfaction with their breast milk, “insufficient milk,” or other causes for premature supplementation. Chronic alcohol consumption may have a number of more serious effects, including on infant development, but research is limited. Younger infants tolerate alcohol worse, so abstention or avoidance of infant exposure for the first months of breastfeeding may be wise. Messages to mothers on this issue are conflicting, confusing and often outdated. Too little is done to teach mothers how to reduce infant exposure. Research is needed in different cultures into whether various forms of cautionary messages are likely to discourage breastfeeding.

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Durations: 60 mins
Facilitating Breastfeeding Among Incarcerated Women

Chauntel Norris is a native of Birmingham, AL. She attended the University of Alabama at Birmingham where she earned her B.A. in African American Studies & her B.S. in Psychology.
Chauntel is a DONA trained Birth & Post-Partum Doula, a Lamaze trained Childbirth Educator and a Certified Lactation Counselor. She is the Co-founder of Baobab Birth Collective and currently serves as the Mother's Milk Initiative Coordinator for the Alabama Prison Birth Project.
Chauntel is the mother of two brilliant children Amaiya and Ozell.

Objective 1: Discuss female incarceration;

Objective 2: Describe program development ;

Objective 3: Explain the impact of incarceration on breastfeeding.

Abstract:

During this presentation the barriers of incarceration as it relates to lactating parents will be discussed. An overview of Program development, Partnerships development and working with corrections will also be considered. I will also show how our Alabama initiative combats those barriers and allows incarcerated women to be able to provide their milk to their infants.

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Durations: 60 mins
Understanding Lactation-Related Research

Dr. Rojjanasrirat is a Professor and Director of Research and Scholarship at Graceland University School of Nursing, Independence, Missouri. She is currently teaching graduate level, on-line nursing research courses. Her area of research focuses on promoting and supporting breastfeeding mothers.
She is a current president of the Sigma Pi Eta Chapter and a former president of the Greater Kansas City Lactation Consultant association, and a current Chair of the finance committee of Board of Director for the Maternal and Child Health Coalition of the Greater Kansas City, Missouri, USA.

Objective 1: Describe basic research and its application to clinical practice;

Objective 2: Differentiate major characteristics between quantitative and qualitative research;

Objective 3: Identify basic steps in quantitative research studies.

Abstract:

Evidence-based practice directly influences and drives day-to-day clinical practice in the current healthcare environments. Lactation consultants need to keep up to date with research evidence for best practice. Although the primary goal of lactation providers is to provide optimal lactation care to breastfeeding mothers, it is necessary to know how to apply appropriate evidence to use on a regular basis by understanding research process and how to read research articles. The purposes of this presentation are to present basic concepts related to conducting and understanding lactation related research including quantitative and qualitative research methods. In addition, the presentation also will cover the guides to reading scientific research articles. The participants do not require extensive or advanced medical or research methodological knowledge to attend this workshop. Some breastfeeding research papers including case studies, clinical trials, and qualitative research will be used as examples.

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Durations: 60 mins

Carlos González was born in Zaragoza, Spain, in 1960. He is married and is the father of three children. In 1983 he graduated in medicine at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and between 1984 and 1987 he studied pediatrics at the Hospital of Sant Joan de Déu in that city.
He is founder and president of ACPAM (Catalan Association for Breastfeeding) since 1991. Since this association he has directed and taught in more than 100 courses on breastfeeding for health professionals. He is the author of several books, including My child won’t eat, Kiss me!, and Breastfeeding made easy. He has lectured for professionals or general public in Germany, Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Spain, United States, France, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, United Kingdom, Dominican Republic, Russia, Uruguay and Venezuela.
Since 1994, he has been a regular contributor to Ser Padres magazine , where he attends a nursing and child feeding office. He has also collaborated with other publications, such as the magazine Tu Baby, Mente Sana, Lecturas, the disappeared Solaica and the newspaper in Catalan Ara.

Objective 1: Discuss the variability of child growth;

Objective 2: Explain the use of the less used charts: growth velocity, weight for height, BMI;

Objective 3: Describe the usual pitfalls in growth assessment.

Abstract:

Inappropriate use of growth charts can cause familiar anxiety, unnecessary supplementation, early weaning, unnecessary testing and force-feeding. With half of the population below the mean, at least a 3% of the average weight of people are (and have to be) under the third percentile. Percentile lines are mathematical constructions, and do not represent the actual growth patterns of individual babies.

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Durations: 60 mins
Sharon L. Unger, MD, FRCP(C)
The Use of Human Donor Milk in the High Risk Neonate
Canada Sharon L. Unger, MD, FRCP(C)

Dr. Sharon Unger comes from the East Coast of Canada and is a neonatologist at Sinai Health System in Toronto, Canada. She is a co-primary investigator for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded OptiMoM and MaxiMoM programs of research as well as the medical director for the Rogers Hixon Ontario Human Milk Bank. Her research interests are primarily in the use of human milk for the high risk neonate and its long term impact.

Delegates will be able to:

1: Discuss the differences between mother's milk and human donor milk
2. Discuss the scientific evidence behind current human donor milk usage guidelines
3. Discuss some of the ethical considerations in human donor milk use


Canada Sharon L. Unger, MD, FRCP(C)
Abstract:

Mother’s milk is the unequalled nutritional source for the preterm or medically fragile neonate. Beyond its nutritional impact, it contains a myriad of bioactive molecules that are of particular health importance for the sick neonate. A majority of mothers who are pump dependent with an infant in a neonatal intensive care unit have an incomplete supply of their own milk. In this instance, human donor milk is an important supplement to have available while the mother is supported to increase her own milk supply. This lecture will focus on various aspects of the use of human donor milk including a review of the differences between mother’s milk and donor milk and the current methodologies used for processing donor milk. Recommended clinical guidelines will be discussed that are based on the evidence for short and long term health outcomes following the use of donor milk in the neonatal period. Future considerations will be explored including ethical issues with respect to donor milk use.

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Durations: 60 mins
Virus Killing by White Blood Cells in Breast Milk: How Breastfeeding Is Protective Against HIV

Rebecca LR Powell, PhD, CLC is an Assistant Professor in the department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. Currently Dr. Powell is analyzing the phagocytosis responses of various cell types to better understand the effects of phagocytosis receptor profiles and the impact of antibody specificity on the elicitation of biologic function. Additionally, Dr. Powell is studying the contribution of breast milk leukocytes to the relatively low rate of HIV transmission in infants exclusively breastfed by their HIV-infected mothers. She received her PhD in Microbiology from the Sackler Institute, New York University School of Medicine, and her CLC from the Healthy Children Project.

Objective 1: Explain how breast milk is both a vehicle for mother-to-child transmission of HIV and also protects against transmission;

Objective 2: List the cellular components of human breast milk;

Objective 3: Describe how maternal cells can be isolated from breast milk and used for analysis of their anti-viral functions.

Abstract:

Unless access to clean water and appropriate infant formula is reliable, the World Health Organization does not recommend HIV-infected mothers stop breastfeeding. Remarkably, only about 15% of babies exclusively breastfed by their HIV-infected mothers become infected with HIV. This suggests that although breast milk is a vehicle for HIV transmission, the milk itself exhibits a strong protective effect against infection. Breastfed babies ingest 100,000 - 100,000,000 maternal cells every day via breast milk; what remains largely unclear is the contribution of these cells to the milk’s anti-viral qualities. A large study has been undertaken to isolate cells from human milk in order to measure the ability of these cells to engulf and destroy HIV by a mechanism known as phagocytosis. Over 50 samples of breast milk obtained from healthy women have been analyzed. Phagocytosis of HIV was detected in all samples. Activity did not appear to correlate with stage of lactation. Various cell types known for phagocytic capacity were identified and measured, including granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. All samples exhibited strong granulocyte activity.These data further demonstrate that phagocytosis of HIV by immune cells from breast milk can be measured. This information will be critical for design of therapeutic vaccines capable of reducing the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in areas where breastfeeding is essential.

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Durations: 60 mins
What’s New With the International Code on the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes: It’s Not Just About Formula!

A Canadian living in France for more than 25 years, Juanita discovered breastfeeding with her three children and has never looked back.
She became a La Leche League Leader in 1997, and served on the boards of LLL France 2004-2008 and LLL Europe 2011-2018. She has been the regional representative of LLL Europe to WABA since 2007. Juanita became a lactation consultant in 2003 (IBCLC), recertifying in 2008 and 2013.
Juanita was the coordinator for the Journée Internationale de l’Allaitement (‘JIA’ – International Breastfeeding Conference for health professionals organized by LLL France) in 2003 and 2008. She helped create and implement the Peer Counsellor Programme in France (Programme relais allaitement- Prall).
The WHO Code is one of her passions! She has spoken on the Code at conferences around the world. Member of the Coordination française pour l’allaitement maternel (CoFam) since 2007, she was head of the Task Force on the Code and ethical questions. As a member of IBFAN *and GIFA, she was given the opportunity to participate in international meetings of the Codex Alimentarius and the OECD in Paris, as well as in week-long IBFAN conferences in Montecatini, Italy in 2007, and in Geneva in 2008. She also attended the Committee on the Convention on Rights of the Child in Geneva for IBFAN and helped prepare a country report on France underlining the importance of breastfeeding and the need to apply the Code (2009). She is an active member of IBFAN’s Global Working Group on Contaminants in Breastmilk. In 2018, she represented LLLI at the second NetCode meeting in Geneva.

Objective 1: Cite three key international documents directly referring to the International Code;

Objective 2: Define the products now considered to be breastmilk substitutes according to the Guidance on the inappropriate promotion of foods for infants and young children.;

Objective 3: Describe conflict of interest with industry as defined by the Code and cite three specific types of conflict of interest.

Abstract:

The International Code on the Marketing of breast milk substitutes is the very cornerstone of breastfeeding protection, promotion and support, and an integral part of infant and young feeding policies around the world; yet it is often misunderstood or considered to be an out of date document with little relevance to breastfeeding issues today. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Code is updated regularly with additional resolutions voted at World Health Assemblies every two years, and covers far more than the marketing of breast milk substitutes in the first six months of life, but promotes optimal nutrition practices up to 36 months, and addresses conflict of interest with infant food companies. Indeed, the rapidly growing global market of breast milk substitutes, estimated at more than $70 billion in 2019, continues to undermine breastfeeding through its evermore aggressive and omnipresent marketing techniques, focused on parents, health professionals and health systems. The stakes are high – understanding and implementing the Code is an essential step towards ensuring optimal nutrition for infants and young children, whether breastfed or formula-fed.

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Durations: 60 mins
Rhythmic Movement for Breastfeeding Function

Bryna is a lactation consultant, educator, and birth doula. She began her education in marine chemistry, but pivoted to birth work after the birth of her daughter, Maia. After a rigorous 4500hr internship before sitting for the IBCLC exam, she discovered she never wants to stop learning about the things that impact pregnancy, birth, and lactation (which is pretty much everything). Enamored will all things continuing education, Bryna has undertaken many various courses and offerings, as well as research on her own. She has a particular heart for reflex integration in lactation care, as well as advocacy for equitable treatment for LGBTQ+ families in birth and lactation. Bryna has four children, and lives with her family, dog, ducks, and chickens near Portland, Oregon, in the American Pacific Northwest. When not teaching, attending births, seeing clients, or child wrangling, Bryna likes to knit and attend Renaissance Faires, sometimes at the same time!

Objective 1: Identify the impacts of movement on development and learning ;

Objective 2: Describe the reflexes that are present in the infant feeding response and explain their normal expression and expected function;

Objective 3: Discuss the impacts of trauma and modern barriers to reflex integration and address opportunities to help mitigate them;

Abstract:

Disorganized or absent infant reflexes can create challenges for breastfeeding/chestfeeding. This presentation takes a close look at the role of movement in the integration of disorganized infant reflexes and the use of rhythmic movement as a method for overcoming infant feeding challenges. This talk also covers socio-cultural impacts of trauma, lack of opportunity for movement, and modern care system barriers to reflex integration.

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Durations: 60 mins
How To Enhance Breastfeeding A Lot: Engage Fathers

Duncan Fisher promotes and develops support for parents to advance child health and development. In the last year he has been working with breastfeeding researchers across the world and with the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action to advance the idea of "breastfeeding as teamwork", following striking findings from research of the high gains from engaging with fathers and other family members. In UK he co-founded the Fatherhood Institute and for three years he served on the Board of the Government’s gender equality body, the Equal Opportunities Commission. He manages the website, FamilyIncluded.com, where all recent research on breastfeeding and fathers/families is reported. He initiated and currently manages a website for Cambridge and Princeton Universities reporting research on child welfare and development, ChildandFamilyBlog.com. He was awarded an OBE by the Queen in 2008 for his “services to children”. Duncan lives in Wales and divides his time between family work and work to support sustainable economic development in his home country.

Objective 1: Describe the evidence about the influence of fathers on breastfeeding;

Objective 2: Discuss evidence-based principles for engaging fathers to support breastfeeding;

Objective 3: Explain how the support of fathers and the autonomy of mothers can be combined through teamwork;

Abstract:

Breastfeeding programmes that engage fathers are more effective than ones that only involve mothers and professionals. This accords with research that has shown that family is the main influence on breastfeeding. The way that families influence breastfeeding is diverse, depending on the make-up of the family, local culture and location (e.g. urban/rural). The influence of fathers is not necessarily intentional, but what fathers think and do influences the situation in almost every situation. In this presentation I will describe the principles of success that have been learned from programmes with published evaluations. These principles can be summed up in the phrase recently adopted by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, "breastfeeding is teamwork".

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Durations: 60 mins
Nikki Hunter Greenaway, MSN FNP, IBCLC
The Effects of Breastfeeding on Sexual Intimacy
United States Nikki Hunter Greenaway, MSN FNP, IBCLC

Nikki Hunter Greenaway is a board-certified family nurse practitioner and internationally board-certified lactation consultant in New Orleans, Louisiana. In 2011, she founded Nurse Nikki Family & Maternity Services, a health consulting firm where she educates and counsels women, families, schools and businesses about pregnancy, birth, postpartum, breastfeeding, and new baby care. October 2018 she opened Bloom Maternal Health, a women’s health clinic that provides prenatal counseling and postpartum recovery care. Nurse Nikki is the co-founder of Louisiana’s first free-standing infant feeding clinic, the New Orleans Breastfeeding Center. She also co-created Café au Lait Breastfeeding Circle for Families of Color and Nikki & Nikki Lactation Career Consultants two important resources needed to improve breastfeeding outcomes specifically in the Black community. Nikki is a wife and mother of 3 mini breastfeeding activists.

Objective 1: Identify barriers breastfeeding mothers experience in regards to intimacy;

Objective 2: Explain the relationship between prolactin, oxytocin and estrogen and how it relates to physical and mental sexual arousal;

Objective 3: Describe resources and counseling techniques consultants can use to provide support;

United States Nikki Hunter Greenaway, MSN FNP, IBCLC
Abstract:

Lactation consultations delve into perfecting a latch, maximizing milk supply and even recovering from giving birth. Very few visits discuss how breastfeeding can affect intimacy. The research on breastfeeding and intimacy is scarce and the assessment tools and evidence-based solutions are almost nonexistent. Perinatal providers often don’t recognize the relevance or have time to troubleshoot the inquiries. Lactation specialists understand that the situation exists but may not know how to approach the line of questioning or how to provide solutions. This webinar will illustrate the relationship between lactation-specific hormones and sex hormones. It will present the mental and physical struggles that families face when tackling the topic of returning to intimacy when breastfeeding. Providers and lactation consultants will receive recommendations on how to approach, assess and assist in resolving clients’ perceptions and concerns surrounding breastfeeding and intimacy. Discussion will offer web resources and how to add the topic into community resources.

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Durations: 60 mins
Sejal Fichadia, B.S (Microbiology), B.S. (Clinical Laboratory Science), IBCLC, CEIM
Teaching Infant Facial Massage to Parents to Support a Functional Latch
United States Sejal Fichadia, B.S (Microbiology), B.S. (Clinical Laboratory Science), IBCLC, CEIM

Sejal is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), she combines her professional expertise with her personal instincts as a mother and a supportive team member.
She has been teaching infant massage classes in the community since 2014, both as a group class and private lessons. She uses her experience as an infant massage educator to teach parents how to bond with their babies through touch.
She also brings with her the following comprehensive toolkit: CAPPA-certified postpartum doula since 2014 Certified in and facilitates TummyTime!™ method classes since 2014 Teaches Newborn Care and Breastfeeding classes Certified in skin-to-skin care for full term infants from the United States Institute of Kangaroo Care Certified Provider of Innate Postpartum Care
She has presented at ILCA 2018 and 2019 and at their local lactation association for Oregon and Washington on the topics of facial massage for infants and how infant’s posture impacts breastfeeding.
She strives to help each family by continuing to learn all she can about breastfeeding and parent-infant connection using the neurobiological lens.
When Sejal not with clients, you can find her at home in Hillsboro, Oregon with her husband, two kids, and a furbaby she loves to spoil.

Delegates will be able to:

1: Describe to teach parents how to use facial massage as a therapeutic tool
2: Discuss with parents parents the value of attunement and engaging with their baby
3: Use facial massage to deliver messages to a baby’s nervous system and increase facial movement


United States Sejal Fichadia, B.S (Microbiology), B.S. (Clinical Laboratory Science), IBCLC, CEIM
Abstract:

Background: The benefits of massage have been shown in many research studies. Massage relieves stress, pain and muscle tension. We expect to show that the same benefits can be achieved when facial massage is used to optimize a baby’s oral structures to support a functional latch.

Method: We hope to use facial massage as a tool for babies that do not have an optimal latch. Babies born with gestational constraints, traumatic birth, exposure to stress during pregnancy or babies with tethered oral tissues may benefit from a parent massaging their face. Attendees will have access to handouts and a video link and may use their own face to practice the facial massage strokes.

Results: Building strength by oral and facial muscles, relaxing tension in the jaw, the lips, the muscles around the lips, and muscles of facial expression may help optimize the latch and hence prevent nipple damage.

Conclusion: IBCLCs can have an extra tool in their toolkit to offer to new parents. Facial massage techniques to support a functional latch can increase a parent’s confidence in caring for their baby, while increasing the levels of oxytocin and thereby promoting parent-infant bond

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Durations: 60 mins
Moving from Evidence to Practice: Knowledge Translation and Breastfeeding Support

Sonia Semenic is an Associate Professor at the Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) and a Nurse Scientist at the McGill University Health Center. After many years of experience as an IBCLC and Clinical Nurse Specialist in maternal-child health, Sonia completed a PhD in Nursing and postdoctoral training in community health. Her research aims to better understand the process of knowledge translation (KT) in perinatal health, with a particular focus on the implementation of evidence-based practices to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. She currently co-leads the Knowledge Translation Platform for the Quebec Nursing Intervention Research Network, and teaches graduate courses on knowledge translation in nursing practice.

Delegates will be able to:

1: Describe the concepts of ""Evidence-based Practice"" and Knowledge Translation
2: Identify key factors influencing knowledge translation in health care
3: Discuss strategies to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based practices in lactation support


Abstract:

Despite irrefutable research evidence for the benefits of breastfeeding, less than 37% of infants worldwide meet WHO targets for optimal breastfeeding. Persistently low breastfeeding rates are due in part due to poor uptake of breastfeeding best-practice guidelines, such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The growing field of knowledge translation in healthcare reveals that it takes from 8-30 years for research findings to be adopted into clinical practice, and that up to 45% of patients don’t receive evidence-based healthcare. This presentation aims to help those providing lactation support to better understand the complexity of factors influencing the use of evidence in practice, as well as what can be done to facilitate the uptake of best practice guidelines to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. Whether or not care providers follow evidence-based practices is influenced by the nature of the evidence (e.g., perceived relevance of the evidence), characteristics of the care providers (e.g., motivations to change practice) as well as characteristics of the care environment (e.g., leadership support for change). Successful strategies for supporting practice change are tailored to local barriers and facilitators to evidence use, and can be informed by the growing number of theoretical models and frameworks for KT in healthcare.

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Durations: 60 mins
Tomoko Seo, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Lactation Education as Advocacy: Increasing Knowledge Among Physicians
Japan Tomoko Seo, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Tomoko Seo is a pediatrician and IBCLC in Japan, working in a private clinic with colleagues including IBCLCs who practice's general pediatrics and breastfeeding medicine. She became certified as an IBCLC in 1999 and recertified in 2004, 2009, 2014 and 2019. She is a member of the Japanese Association of Lactation Consultants (JALC) since 1999, when it was founded. JALC has been holding conferences several times a year, including the “Annual Breastfeeding Seminar for Physicians” since 2005 to provide breastfeeding education to physicians and improve breastfeeding support among physicians. Tomko has been a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) since 1999. She is also an active member of the International, Protocol, Education, Conference, Membership Committees of ABM.

Objective 1: Describe the importance of breastfeeding education for physicians;

Objective 2: Identify the significance of successful breastfeeding experience for physicians;

Objective 3: List educational opportunities and materials for physicians to protect, promote and support breastfeeding around participants;

Japan Tomoko Seo, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Breastfeeding facilitates good health in infants and mothers, and for all humans throughout life. Medical professionals should be advocates for breastfeeding, and physicians could be one of the most influential advocates. However, many medical students, residents and physicians have very limited opportunities to learn about breastfeeding and human lactation during their medical education. From another point of view, breastfeeding is a private experience as well as a scientific matter. If a physician or a partner successfully breastfeeds, she/he may become a more effective advocate for breastfeeding. So, it is imperative to provide medical students, residents, and young physicians with education about breastfeeding and to enable them to experience successful breastfeeding personally, in order for them to promote and support breastfeeding among their patients.

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is an international organization of physicians who protect, promote, and support breastfeeding, and one of its goals is to develop and disseminate the standard for physician education around breastfeeding and human lactation. ABM has developed protocols and statements for health care providers to utilize for breastfeeding management.

The WHO/UNICEF revised Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in 2018, includes in Step2 “Ensure that staff have sufficient knowledge, competence and skills to support breastfeeding”. This included physician education. There are many ways to educate physicians, and ABM materials could be one option.

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Durations: 60 mins
Liberate Millennials from The Pressures of Breastfeeding With the Power of Social Media Support

In 2014, Ghanaian-American mother and photographer, Vanessa Simmons authored the Normalize Breastfeeding™ movement to address the taboo of public breastfeeding in modern society. Her mission was to document diverse variations of normal infant feeding, across cultures and delivery methods of human milk.
Through Simmons' viral blog, her photographic speaking tour, philanthropy, and artistic inspiration; she mobilized and motivated thousands of women to share their breastfeeding photos on social media. After a very successful first year, she reached out to the Mayor of San Diego to proclaim June 27th the International Day to Normalize Breastfeeding, in support of the worldwide anniversary event!
Lactation educator and activist, Vanessa Simmons, is now speaking out at conferences and events across the country to eliminate general miseducation around the topic. On the Normalize Breastfeeding podcast, she interviews guests about experiences, advocacy, and activism within the infant feeding community worldwide.
As a public speaker, Simmons is focused on transforming the modern mindset around the natural, yet difficult task of breastfeeding. Vanessa trains lactation professionals to better understand and connect with millennial families online. She creatively motivates and inspires families to be mindful that this is a time to be cherished, and although fleeting, it is also a time to reinvent what will be acceptable for feeding generations of the future.
Simmons is an aspiring author and resides with her supportive husband and three children in San Diego, CA.


Objective 1: List two types of media to capture stories;

Objective 2: Recite three important steps to capturing WIC stories;

Objective 3: Assess which social platform is best for their availability and posting style;

Abstract:

Many studies from around the world show that supporting moms on their journey can help them to successfully breastfeed and reach their personal feeding goals. Today we see many lactating parents go online through various social media platforms in search of support. Vanessa Simmons uses storytelling and humor to share her own support experiences and explains why creating social media support for millennial families liberates them from the on-going pressures around breastfeeding.

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Durations: 60 mins
Identifying Musculoskeletal Issues That Impact Breastfeeding

Dr. Jessie Young is a Pediatric Chiropractor near Olympia Washington who works closely with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive and collaborative care. She has specialized education in treating breastfeeding difficulties and is near completion of her IBCLC certification. As part of a family's health care team, Dr. Young helps resolve musculoskeletal issues causing breastfeeding difficulties including neck tension, TMJ dysfunction, torticollis, and painful latch. She also provides pre and post-frenotomy care for musculoskeletal issues contributing to tethered oral tissue. Providers, parents and patients rely on Dr. Young for her comprehensive diagnostic and treatment approaches, including modified chiropractic adjustments, myofascial release, therapeutic exercise, and craniosacral techniques. Dr. Young currently volunteers to promote literature contributions and advancement as the Research Chair for the American Chiropractic Association Council on Chiropractic Pediatrics.

Delegates will be able to:

1. Evaluate for musculoskeletal issues that can interfere with successful breastfeeding
2. Identify indications for co-management and/or referral
3. Communicate with parents and other providers the safety and effectiveness of manual therapy for breastfeeding issues


Abstract:

Identifying musculoskeletal issues that can impact breastfeeding is an important component of proper management. When surveyed, IBCLCs reported that half were not comfortable identifying musculoskeletal issues .Referrals for musculoskeletal problems were thus hypothesized to be delayed as a result of this discomfort. It was recommended that lactation professionals could benefit from more specialized training in identifying musculoskeletal issues, as early intervention for breastfeeding difficulties is a critical determinant in success.
Attendees will be able to take away the skills and tools to better identify musculoskeletal problems, the indications for co-management/referral and the safety and effectiveness of manual therapy for suboptimal breastfeeding . Issues such as TMJ dysfunction, postural asymmetry, cranial asymmetry, myofascial and joint restrictions commonly cause suboptimal breastfeeding. Current literature supports the fact that favorable outcomes are probable when these issues are treated with manual therapy. Thus the timely identification, referral, and resolution of musculoskeletal issues is one factor that can contribute to the resolution of breastfeeding difficulties.

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Durations: 60 mins
Relactation - A Supportive Approach

Lucy Ruddle is an IBCLC in the UK. She has a thriving private Practice on the South Coast and a busy Facebook page known for it's funny, relevant, and informative memes about breastfeeding and parenting. Lucy qualified in 2018 after 5 years of volunteering as a peer supporter and later as a breastfeeding counselor for a national breastfeeding helpline. She has written a book on relactation, called "Relactation - A guide to rebuilding your milk supply." which was published by Praeclarus Press in January 2020. Lucy's interest in relactation started after she went through the process herself for her eldest baby, and her drive to qualify as an IBCLC came from a second challenging breastfeeding journey with her younger son who was unable to latch for several months. Aside from lactation, Lucy holds a diploma in Child Psychology and worked for 15 years in early years settings, both with the children and in roles supporting parents. She prides herself on her listening focused approach to lactation support, and sees it as the key to good practice in her own work.

Objective 1: Understand the complex reasons Parents come to relactation, and their feelings.;

Objective 2: Know how to support families both with the direct process of relactation, and in the wider context.;

Objective 3: Describe the evidence, risks and benefits regarding galactagogues.;

Abstract:

Breastfeeding rates in the UK are still incredibly low, and around 80% of mothers say they wanted to breastfeed for longer than they did. Because of this, more people are beginning to talk about relactation, but the process is filled with myths, questions, and challenges. This talk will take you through why people want to relactate, including the grief and shame they may be experiencing following a difficult breastfeeding experience. We will talk about how the mother can surround herself with support and why this is so important. We will also look at supporting the baby to return to the breast, pumping tips which can help the mother to succeed, and we will discuss the risks and benefits of galactagogues - including the issues with the lack of comprehensive studies on this topic.

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Durations: 60 mins
Robinson Reed, MSN, CNM, ARNP, IBCLC
Queer Milk: Inclusive Lactation Care for LGBTQ Families
United States Robinson Reed, MSN, CNM, ARNP, IBCLC

Robinson (Rob) Reed (pronouns: they/them) is a certified nurse midwife and international board certified lactation consultant providing full scope midwifery and lactation care at Swedish Midwifery First Hill in Seattle, WA. As a queer and nonbinary healthcare provider, Rob is passionate about providing sex-positive, gender-affirming, trauma-informed care to their patients. Rob draws from over a decade of mindfulness practice to integrate compassion and intentional presence with the busyness of clinical practice. In addition to precepting midwifery students, Rob offers mentorship to queer and trans future healthcare providers, and consults with hospital maternity units on issues around gender inclusivity in sexual and reproductive healthcare and lactation care.

Delegates will be able to: Objective 1: Utilize affirming and inclusive language when caring for LGBTQ patients and families, and implement a number of strategies to make lactation care more inclusive and accessible Objective 2: Describe the process of inducing lactation for non-gestational parents (both cisgender and transgender) and discuss some of the medical and social considerations involved in this process Objective 3: Discuss lactation care for transmasculine and nonbinary people after giving birth, whether or not they have had chest surgery


United States Robinson Reed, MSN, CNM, ARNP, IBCLC
Abstract:

LGBTQ families have long been made invisible in their experiences of building their families, and this extends to lactation care as well. Queer, trans, and nonbinary parents need and deserve support that centers the unique challenges they may face and celebrates their creativity and resilience. Trans men or nonbinary people who give birth may desire to chestfeed their infants. Non-gestational partners who choose to induce lactation to share in breastfeeding their infants need guidance and advice through this process. Trans women may find breastfeeding to be a strongly gender-affirming experience. Many lactation professionals have a desire to support LGBTQ patients, but lack knowledge of inclusive terminology or specific ways to provide affirming care. This session will review gender-inclusive language, hands-on skills, and clinical pearls to improve lactation care for LGBTQ patients.

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Durations: 75 mins
Breastfeeding With Ease: The Impact of Infant Reflex Emergence and Integration

Bryna is a lactation consultant, educator, and birth doula. She began her education in marine chemistry, but pivoted to birth work after the birth of her daughter, Maia. After a rigorous 4500hr internship before sitting for the IBCLC exam, she discovered she never wants to stop learning about the things that impact pregnancy, birth, and lactation (which is pretty much everything). Enamored will all things continuing education, Bryna has undertaken many various courses and offerings, as well as research on her own. She has a particular heart for reflex integration in lactation care, as well as advocacy for equitable treatment for LGBTQ+ families in birth and lactation. Bryna has four children, and lives with her family, dog, ducks, and chickens near Portland, Oregon, in the American Pacific Northwest. When not teaching, attending births, seeing clients, or child wrangling, Bryna likes to knit and attend Renaissance Faires, sometimes at the same time!

Objective 1: Discuss the process of reflex emergence and integration as they relate to breast/chestfeeding.;

Objective 2: Explain the importance of reflexes in breastfeeding. ;

Objective 3: Explain the impacts of trauma on infant reflex integration;

Abstract:

Reflexes play an important role in role in an infant’s ability to feed effectively. This foundational presentation discusses the process of reflex emergence and integration, the importance of reflexes in breastfeeding/chestfeeding and the impact of disorganized or absent reflexes. Also covered will be the impacts of trauma on infant reflex integration and the role of the lactation consultant in assessment and referral.

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Durations: 75 mins
Mona Liza Hamlin, MSN, RN, IBCLC
Breastfeeding as a Preventative Care Change Model: How to Affect Change
United States Mona Liza Hamlin, MSN, RN, IBCLC

Mona Liza Hamlin, MSN, RN, IBCLC is the nurse manager of Perinatal Resources and Community Programs for the Women & Children’s Service Line at Christiana Care Hospital in Newark, Delaware. Her role consists of improving both inpatient and outpatient programs that focus on reaching the triple AIM, and improving health equity in the state of Delaware. Hamlin serves as Past-Chair to the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC). The USBC is a coalition of more than 50 organizations that support its mission to drive collaborative efforts for policy and practices that create a landscape of breastfeeding support across the United States.
She is a founding member of the National Association of Professional & Peer Lactation Supporters of Color (NAPPLSC), an organization aimed at addressing breastfeeding disparities and improving breastfeeding
amongst families of color. Hamlin also serves as a member of the Delaware Healthy Mother & Infant Consortium and is a board member
for the Breastfeeding Coalition of Delaware. Her fundamental
belief is that equitable access and high quality care are provided to all women and families, especially those most vulnerable to lack of access and systemic barriers to care. Fueled by her professional and personal experiences and passions, Hamlin strives to ensure that all mothers have access to a full scope of perinatal care, support and resources.

Objective 1: Explain the importance of breastfeeding and human milk in the overall discussion of preventative care and maternal child health.;

Objective 2: Describe how to bring breastfeeding and human milk into a conversation about health maternal child health disparities.;

Objective 3: List examples of how adding breastfeeding and human milk into the conversation of disparities in maternal child health will elevate our goals in the lactation field;

United States Mona Liza Hamlin, MSN, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

No matter where we look health disparities, morbidity and mortality continue to persist. This is especially true in the maternal child health field. We all understand the value of breastfeeding and human milk and it is now critical to merge that value across the spectrum of maternal child health. No matter the organization or work we are in; clinical, community, public health, or policy; we must create connections that improve and create holistic approaches to improve health and prevent illness. Linking breastfeeding and human milk in efforts made outside of the field of lactation will improve overall efforts to improve maternal child health. This discussion will give opportunity to explore how to engage with non traditional stakeholders and make the connections where breastfeeding isn't traditionally included to discuss preventative care for maternal child health as a whole.

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Durations: 60 mins
The Real Life Experience of Working in Lactation Care: Struggles and Solutions

Madeline Murray, CPM, is a homebirth baby, homebirth turned hospital-transfer mom, midwife on a mission to make more midwives and bring the midwives model of care to more American families. Madeline’s passion project, believe in midwifery is designed to raise awareness among midwives and mothers about the perils of the on-call lifestyle and the changes in practice necessary for making midwifery careers more attainable for students and more sustainable for practicing midwives. Through writing, speaking engagements and personalized consultations Madeline hopes to encourage midwives to begin working with one another to reduce burnout and to become aware of their own unique needs to make their midwifery careers long lasting.

Paul Golden,  RM RN PGCE (teaching) Mediator (AMINZ),
is a midwife working independently and in a variety of govt hospitals in the UK NZ Australia Asia etc. Paul trained in law and mediation. He lectures on midwifery, law, human rights in childbirth globally, including: Russia, China, India, Europe, etc. He is a neonatal intensive care nurse and provides newborn feeding support including tongue tie release (frenulotomy). He has a special interest in twins as he and his sons are identical twins. He has been working with birth for over thirty years and is now writing and filmmaking on global human rights and childbirth choices.

Margreet Wibblelink, PhD, co-Founded the Healthy Mom and Baby Clinic in Jeffrey’s Bay, South Africa (www.hmbc.co.za). This is a non-profit organization committed to delivering professional private care to the most vulnerable and underprivileged women of their community. She also works as a private midwife and is known as ‘The Surfing Midwife’ (www.thesurfingmidwife.com). She is currently the managing director at Sister Lilian Centre (www.sisterlilian.co.za) and Sensitive Midwifery (www.senstivemidwifery.co.za) a national education platform for midwives and parents. She finds herself in a transitioning stage where her local, small scale operations, are developing into a national and international platform to be a voice and champion the midwifery profession as a whole. This is in line with her PhD, which is looking at strategies to scale-up clinical midwifery practices in South Africa. She can call herself a pro-surfer as she has placed herself twice at the WSL World Longboarding Championship and still compete in various surfing competitions in South Africa. She obtained her Bachelors degree in Midwifery from the Artevelde Hogeschool in Gent, Belgium (2002). She furthered her studies with a BcurHons in Advanced Midwifery and Neonatal Nursing Science (2012), a Master’s Research in Midwifery (2014) and a Doctorate in Philosophy (PhD) in Midwifery, all at the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

Abstract:

It’s a wonderful feeling when you’re able to support a family in getting to a place of successful breastfeeding/chestfeeding. Those moments when things suddenly click and baby starts nursing effectively and their overwhelmed parents are able to finally see an end to their struggles, are heartwarming and we celebrate those achievements for both our clients and ourselves. What doesn’t get talked about very often however, is the struggles that go alongside those triumphs. The caregiver burnout, compassion fatigue, guilt, and overwelming feelings of failure that can derail our confidence in ourselves as care providers. This panel digs deep into the realities of working as a lactation care provider, examining both the struggles and possible solutions.

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Durations: 60 mins
Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC
Ask the Expert: Best Practices for Intake, Documentation, and Reporting
United States Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC

Annie Frisbie has been an IBCLC in private practice since 2011. Her background is in media, where she worked very closely with producers, content developers, and tech thought leaders on business strategy, content development, contracts, legal clearances, and more. She has also produced training for professional media software solutions as well as created and managed print and video content for media professionals.
In 2018 she was honored with the US Lactation Consultant Association's President's Award, "awarding those that demonstrate extraordinary service to the association and profession."
She is a produced screenwriter and proud member of the Writers Guild of America, East. She have a BA from Franklin and Marshall College, and an MA in Cinema Studies from New York University. In a previous life I was a film critic. I live with my husband and our two children in Queens, New York.

Objective 1: List the four key aspects of the client/patient workflow (Intake, Documentation, Care Plans, and Physician Reports).

Objective 2: Demonstrate how to protect privacy in all aspects.

Objective 3: Describe digital services that can help organize and manage workflow and client/patient data.

United States Annie Frisbie, MA, IBCLC
Abstract:

Follow the complete life cycle of a typical client through collecting information during the intake process, documenting and charting effectively and efficiently, and communicating with families and their care providers. Bring your questions about incorporating technology while protecting client/patient privacy and providing compassionate care so families can meet their goals.

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Durations: 60 mins
Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC
A Case Study Approach to Critical Thinking Skills for Lactation Professionals
USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC

Melissa Cole is a board-certified lactation consultant, neonatal oral-motor assessment professional and clinical herbalist in private practice. Melissa is passionate about providing comprehensive, holistic lactation support and improving the level of clinical lactation skills for health professional. She enjoys researching and writing, especially on topics such tongue tie and botanical medicine. Her bachelor’s degree is in maternal/child health and lactation and her master’s degree is in therapeutic herbalism. Before pursuing her current path, Melissa’s background was in education and cultural arts, which has served her well in her work as a lactation consultant and healthcare educator. She loves living, working and playing in the beautiful Pacific Northwest with her 3 children.

Objective 1: List 3 infant-related factors to assess when feeding difficulties present.br>
Objective 2: List 3 parental related factors to assess when feeding difficulties present.

Objective 3: List 3 reasons an infant may struggle to latch.

USA Melissa Cole, IBCLC, RLC
Abstract:

There are many reasons infants struggle to latch and feed well. Critically thinking through a case involves assessing all the variables that may be impacting feedings. This is no easy task when we must consider what is going on on the parent's side and the infant's side. How can we put all the pieces of a complex case together in order to be an effective lactation detective? This interactive session is designed to help providers implement critical thinking skills in order to think outside the box when it comes to difficult cases. Walk through the cases with me and put your skills to the test!

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Durations: 60 mins
Facilitated Discussion on IYCF-E and the Role of the Lactation Professional

Michelle Pensa Branco MPH IBCLC is a lactation consultant and public health advocate. In addition to her clinical practice, which has included in-hospital, outpatient and private practice settings, she advocates for improved maternal-child health practices at the local, national and global level. She has a particular interest in the impact of trauma to breastfeeding families, models of peer support to improve breastfeeding outcomes and the application of health communication principles to the promotion and protection of breastfeeding. Michelle serves as the Director of Peer Support Programs and provides clinical lactation expertise for Nurture Project International, the only international NGO focused exclusively on infant feeding in emergencies. With Jodine Chase, she co-founded a Canadian non-profit organization, SafelyFed Canada. She is also an active member of the Ontario Public Health Association’s Breastfeeding Promotion Working Group. Michelle has previously served as the Vice-Chair of La Leche League Canada, the Communications Director for the Canadian Lactation Consultants Association as well as the Toronto Coordinator of INFACT Canada. When she is not travelling for work, Michelle stays close to home, living with her family just outside Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective 1: Describe the target groups for infant and young child feeding in emergencies (IYCF-E) interventions
Objective 2: List two key documents that provide guidance on IYCF-E
Objective 3: Explain one way in which breastfeeding practices are eroded during an emergency


Abstract:

In emergencies, breastfeeding saves lives - and yet, regardless of the location or type of disaster, breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices are eroded during an emergency. Infant and young child feeding in emergencies (IYCF-E) requires a multi-sectoral approach to meet the needs of both breastfed and non-breastfed children. Where do the skills of breastfeeding counsellors, educators and IBCLCs fit into the IYCF-E response? What competencies do IBCLCs need to provide clinical care in a humanitarian setting and how can IBCLCs obtain those (if they don’t already have them)? Bring your thoughts, experiences and questions and join us for a facilitated discussion about the role of skilled breastfeeding support in protecting infants and young children in emergencies.

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Durations: 60 mins
Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Sharing Your Wisdom: From Abstract Idea to Awesome Prenatal Breastfeeding Class
USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE

Christy Jo has over 25 years of teaching experience. She is passionate about teaching in ways that simplify learning. She has been awarded the United States Presidential Volunteer Award for her community service, the Phyllis Klaus Founder's Award for her contribution to the Mother/Baby bond and the Above and Beyond Award for innovative projects that exemplify the mission of Public Health. She has also been named Lactation Educator Faculty of the Year from Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals Association and earned their Visionary Award in 2015. Christy Jo is the author of Mommy Feeds Baby and co-author of Making Milk. She created the Grow Our Own Lactation Consultant/IBCLC Prep Course which has been used to train hundreds of students to become Lactation Consultants. She currently resides in California with her husband and three children. She continues to serve her community as a birth doula, Private Practice IBCLC, Health Educator for Public Health, and faculty for the CAPPA CLE© and Childbirth Educator Programs.

At the conclusion of the course, the attendees will be able to:

1. List three-six concepts to teach in a prenatal breastfeeding class
2. List at least one way to appeal to the visual, kinesthetic and auditory learner
3. List three activities to incorporate into a prenatal breastfeeding class


USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Abstract:

Get that idea of creating a prenatal breastfeeding class out of your head and make it a reality! You have wisdom to share, but how do you share it in a way that captures parents’ attention and appeals to different learning styles? In this interactive presentation, I’ll guide you through the process of creating a prenatal breastfeeding class. Join in as we work with tools and handouts that will help you create a prenatal breastfeeding class that meets the goal of setting parents up for breastfeeding success!

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Accreditation

CERPs - Continuing Education Recognition Points

Applicable to International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs), Certified Lactation Counsellors (CLCs), Certified Lactation Educators (CLEs), Childbirth Educators (CBEs) and doulas. GOLD Lactation Online Conference 2020 has been approved for 32.5 CERPs (27.5 L CERPs) (3 R CERPs) (2 E CERPs). GOLD Learning is designated as a Long Term Provider of CERPs by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) -Approval #CLT114-07.

Continuing Medical Education :

This Enduring Material activity, GOLD Lactation Conference 2020, has been reviewed and is acceptable for credit by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Term of approval begins 03/30/2020. Term of approval is for one year from this date. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This activity is approved for 28.5 AAFP CME Prescribed/Elective credits.

Nursing CEUs - Nursing Contact Hours:
This nursing continuing professional development activity was approved by American Nurses Association Massachusetts, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. CEUs will be valid through to March 30, 2022.
This lecture is approved for 28.5 CNE.

Upon completion of this activity, GOLD delegates will be able to download an educational credit for this talk. Successful completion requires that you:
  • View this presentation in its entirety, under your individual GOLD login info
  • For GOLD Learning Lecture Library participants, successfully complete a post-test (3 out of 3 questions correctly answered)
  • Fill out the Evaluation Survey

Midwifery CEUs (MEAC Schools):

Applicable to NARM Certified Professional Midwives and those require MEAC Certified Education. The main conference has been approved 2.8 MEAC CEUs equivalent to 28 NARM CEUs.)

Dietetic CPEUs - Dietetic Continuing Education Units:
This program has been approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 28.5 Dietetice CPEUs.

If you have already participated in this program, you are not eligible to receive additional credits for viewing it again. Please sent us an email to team@goldlearning.com if you have any questions.

Additional Details

Viewing Time: 8 Weeks

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