Breastfeeding Medicine Basics for Physicians and other Health Care Providers

Breastfeeding Medicine Basics for Physicians and other Health Care Providers is an 8 hour course designed for medical providers who care for breastfeeding mother/baby dyads in their OB/Gyn, family medicine or pediatric practices. This course focuses on requisite knowledge needed to understand and execute management of common breastfeeding problems, such as mastitis, sore nipples, low/high milk supply, infant fussiness, breastfeeding infants who fail to gain weight, and medication concerns. The material in this course should be considered fundamental knowledge for any medical resident or other health care provider-in-training who plans to work with breastfeeding dyads after graduation.

Produced in partnership with The Milk Mob
$99.00 USD
Total CE Hours: 7.25   Access Time: 12 Weeks  
Lectures in this bundle (11):
Durations: 45 mins
Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
The Biologic Components of Breastmilk; Infant and Maternal Risks of Not Breastfeeding
US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr Leeper first worked as a general pediatrician, and helped to develop a free-standing, nonprofit breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska called MilkWorks, which opened in 2001. She served as its Medical Director, practicing breastfeeding medicine exclusively until 2014. After moving to Kansas City, KS in 2014, she returns to Nebraska monthly to see patients at MilkWorks, and has contracted with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition, the Kansas High Five for Mom and Baby hospital project, and the Kansas chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide education to medical professionals in Kansas. In 2014 she joined the Milk Mob to serve on the board of directors, as a trainer and to help with the development of new educational material. She was honored as a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine in 2009, and elected to its Board of Directors in 2014, currently serving as chair of the Education Committee.

Objective 1: Recite 3 components of breastmilk that provide immunologic protection from illness.
Objective 2: Identify 6 infant risks of not breastfeeding. Objective 3: Identify 4 maternal risks of not breastfeeding.

US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

This module explains the important differences between commercial formula and human milk, highlighting the immune-modulating and protective factors in human milk. We also discuss the evidence for maternal and infant health risks of not breastfeeding.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Prenatal Education and Support of Breastfeeding ; Anatomy and Physiology of Breastfeeding
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Identify 2 infant health contraindications and 2 maternal health contraindications to breastfeeding.
Objective 2: Describe 3 demographic factors that increase the risk of not breastfeeding.
Objective 3: Explain 3 ideas that can be implemented during prenatal care to educate and support pregnant women to breastfeed.
Objective 4: Describe 3 anatomic changes associated with breast tissue differentiation during pregnancy.
Objective 5: Describe the role of prolactin and oxytocin in the function of the lactating breast.

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

How can you educate and support mothers prenatally to meet their breastfeeding goals? What should you look for on prenatal breast exam? What are the sequences of physiologic and hormone events that lead to the establishment of the milk supply? Find out in this module from The Milk Mob!

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 33 mins
Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Positioning, Latch, and Instinctive Feeding Behaviors
US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr Leeper first worked as a general pediatrician, and helped to develop a free-standing, nonprofit breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska called MilkWorks, which opened in 2001. She served as its Medical Director, practicing breastfeeding medicine exclusively until 2014. After moving to Kansas City, KS in 2014, she returns to Nebraska monthly to see patients at MilkWorks, and has contracted with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition, the Kansas High Five for Mom and Baby hospital project, and the Kansas chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide education to medical professionals in Kansas. In 2014 she joined the Milk Mob to serve on the board of directors, as a trainer and to help with the development of new educational material. She was honored as a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine in 2009, and elected to its Board of Directors in 2014, currently serving as chair of the Education Committee.

Objective 1: Describe and demonstrate 4 typical positions used when breastfeeding
Objective 2: Explain 3 signs that a baby is latched deeply onto the breast
Objective 3: Identify 1 risk of using a nipple shield, and 1 indication for the use of a nipple shield

US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Mother and infant positioning play a crucial role in successful latch. The basic understanding of these breastfeeding principles is a useful tool in clinical practice when helping a mother nurse her baby. This module includes videos of mothers and their babies doing this beautiful dance.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 44 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Breastfeeding in the Immediate Postpartum Period- Opportunities and Challenges
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Identify 3 key hospital routines that enable breastfeeding within the first hour after birth.
Objective 2: Describe the physiologic triggers that lead to lactogenesis II.
Objective 3: Name 2 reasons why a newborn breastfeeding baby might have exaggerated jaundice.
Objective 4: List 4 risk factors for neonatal hypoglycemia. Identify 2 ways to support breastfeeding when a newborn has not yet latched by the time of hospital discharge

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Successful breastfeeding at the time of hospital discharge has a strong correlation with breastfeeding duration postpartum. Clinicians can optimize breastfeeding rates by understanding how common hospital practices influence breastfeeding. Topics addressed include skin-to-skin, hypoglycemia, jaundice, feeding frequency, pacifiers and the non-latching baby.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 36 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Breastfeeding Support and Management of Common Problems in the First Week Postpartum
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Recite 3 goals to accomplish regarding breastfeeding support in the first week postpartum.
Objective 2: Describe 3 signs of adequate milk intake in the first 3 days postpartum.
Objective 3: List 3 interventions that support infants and breastfeeding mothers during a delay in lactation in the first week postpartum.

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

The first week postpartum is crucial for the establishment of a healthy milk supply and for maternal confidence in breastfeeding. This module explains the optimal timing of the post-discharge visit, how to assess whether the infant is receiving enough milk, safe means of infant supplementation when needed, and addresses common parental concerns.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 45 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Sore Nipples and Breasts- Etiologies, Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis and Treatment
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Describe 3 common reasons for persistent sore nipples/breasts in a lactating mother.
Objective 2: List 3 indications to clip an infant lingual frenulum.
Objective 3: Discuss 2 treatment options for nipple vasospasm.
Objective 4: Describe 3 causes of nipple dermatitis.
Objective 5: List 2 interventions for a breast abscess.
Objective 6: Identify 3 common bacteria that are known to cause acute mastitis.

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Unfortunately, nipple and breast pain are common breastfeeding problems, and a common reason for premature weaning. Causes covered in this module include shallow latch, poor suck dynamics, pump damage, tongue-tie, nipple blebs, vasospasm, dermatitis, yeast overgrowth, biting, plugged ducts, bacterial dysbiosis, acute mastitis and pregnancy.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 60 mins
Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Low Milk Supply and Insufficient Infant Weight Gain- Etiologies, Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis and Treatment
US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr Leeper first worked as a general pediatrician, and helped to develop a free-standing, nonprofit breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska called MilkWorks, which opened in 2001. She served as its Medical Director, practicing breastfeeding medicine exclusively until 2014. After moving to Kansas City, KS in 2014, she returns to Nebraska monthly to see patients at MilkWorks, and has contracted with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition, the Kansas High Five for Mom and Baby hospital project, and the Kansas chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide education to medical professionals in Kansas. In 2014 she joined the Milk Mob to serve on the board of directors, as a trainer and to help with the development of new educational material. She was honored as a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine in 2009, and elected to its Board of Directors in 2014, currently serving as chair of the Education Committee.

Objective 1: List 2 reasons for insufficient breast development during pregnancy
Objective 2: Describe 2 reasons why a woman may have absence of lactation postpartum
Objective 3: Recite 3 reasons for low milk supply postpartum that are not due to prenatal breast development
Objective 4: Identify 2 behavioral means of increasing milk supply
Objective 5: Describe 2 indications for using herbs or prescription medications to increase milk supply

US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Low milk supply is a very common complaint from mothers. How can you tell the difference between a perceived vs true low milk supply? This module takes a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of low milk supply, and first steps in treatment. A brief description of commonly used galactogogues is included.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 30 mins
Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Principles of Pharmacology and Substance Management during Breastfeeding
US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr Leeper first worked as a general pediatrician, and helped to develop a free-standing, nonprofit breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska called MilkWorks, which opened in 2001. She served as its Medical Director, practicing breastfeeding medicine exclusively until 2014. After moving to Kansas City, KS in 2014, she returns to Nebraska monthly to see patients at MilkWorks, and has contracted with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition, the Kansas High Five for Mom and Baby hospital project, and the Kansas chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide education to medical professionals in Kansas. In 2014 she joined the Milk Mob to serve on the board of directors, as a trainer and to help with the development of new educational material. She was honored as a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine in 2009, and elected to its Board of Directors in 2014, currently serving as chair of the Education Committee.

Objective 1: Describe 2 basic principles of how medications enter human milk.
Objective 2: Recite 2 reliable sources of information for medication use while breastfeeding.
Objective 3: List 3 substances that are contraindicated while breastfeeding.

US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

This module describes the basic principles of medication use during lactation, discusses substance to avoid while breastfeeding, and introduces reliable sources of information for medication use while breastfeeding.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 41 mins
Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Milk Expression, Pump Technology, and Human Milk Storage
US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM

Dr Leeper first worked as a general pediatrician, and helped to develop a free-standing, nonprofit breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska called MilkWorks, which opened in 2001. She served as its Medical Director, practicing breastfeeding medicine exclusively until 2014. After moving to Kansas City, KS in 2014, she returns to Nebraska monthly to see patients at MilkWorks, and has contracted with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition, the Kansas High Five for Mom and Baby hospital project, and the Kansas chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide education to medical professionals in Kansas. In 2014 she joined the Milk Mob to serve on the board of directors, as a trainer and to help with the development of new educational material. She was honored as a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine in 2009, and elected to its Board of Directors in 2014, currently serving as chair of the Education Committee.

Objective 1:Describe 2 advantages to manual expression and 2 advantages to pump expression.
Objective 2: Identify 3 factors to determine proper fitting of breast shield size for a breast pump.
Objective 3: Explain to a new mother how to use her new breast pump.
Objective 4: Describe to a family how long expressed breastmilk may be safely stored at room temperature, in the refrigerator, and in the freezer.

US Kathy Leeper, MD,FAAP, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Mothers who rely on breast pumps for breast emptying need guidance on proper pump selection, flange size, ideal suction, and other instructions. This module reviews basic principles of breast pumps, highlighting basic pump features, proper pump fitting, and how to determine best pump options for different situations. Human milk storage principles are also discussed.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 17 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Symptoms, Evaluation, and Management of Excessive Lactation
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Describe 2 infant symptoms and 2 maternal symptoms of hyperlactation.
Objective 2: Describe 2 behavioral management strategies that can be employed to decrease the milk supply.
Objective 3: Describe 2 substances that can decrease the milk supply.

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Believe it or not, an excessive milk supply is a very common cause of several pediatric complaints such as gastroesophageal reflux, gassiness, and fussiness at the breast. Join us to learn how to identify and manage the problems of maternal hyperlactation.

View Full Presentation Information
Durations: 15 mins
Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Methods of Weaning from Breastfeeding, Basic Concepts of Re-lactation, Induced Lactation, and Tandem Nursing
US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM

Anne Eglash MD, IBCLC, FABM, is a clinical professor with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. In addition to practicing family medicine, she has been a board certified lactation consultant since 1994. Dr. Eglash is a cofounder of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the Medical Director and cofounder of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of the Western Great Lakes, and the Medical Director of the University of Wisconsin Lactation Services. She has published many peer- reviewed articles on breastfeeding medicine, and has special research interests in chronic breast pain, human milk storage, nipple shield use, and outpatient breastfeeding education for health professionals. She sits on the editorial board for Breastfeeding Medicine Journal. She co-hosts and produces a free breastfeeding medicine podcast series, co-sponsored by The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, called The Breastfeeding Medicine Podcast, available on i-tunes. Dr. Eglash is founder and president of The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the creation of breastfeeding-friendly medical systems and communities.

Objective 1: Describe 3 reasons why women wean prematurely.
Objective 2: Describe 2 ways that mothers can decrease the frequency of pumping or nursing in order to wean.
Objective 3: Describe 2 ways to encourage a child over age 2 to wean.
Objective 4: Define tandem nursing, re-lactation and induced lactation.

US Anne Eglash, MD, IBCLC, FABM
Abstract:

Healthcare providers seldom receive training about child-led weaning, mother-led weaning, weaning a toddler or tandem nursing. Fewer still are aware that re-lactation and induced lactation are even possible. This module provides a brief overview of these concepts.

View Full Presentation Information

This course was developed by The Milk Mob, a nonprofit organization dedicated to breastfeeding education. They may contact registrants for this course with additional information about sustainable breastfeeding education resources in the future. Individuals who complete all modules of this course will be granted a three-year membership to The Milk Mob. Membership includes access to: Lecture Notes, Breastfeeding Champion Listserv., Triage Tools with updates, Breastfeeding Education Handouts with updates and The Milk Mob Breastfeeding Education Videos.

This package consists of 11 separate modules presented by Anne Eglash and Kathy Leeper.

Module 1- The Biologic Components of Breastmilk; Infant and Maternal Risks of Not Breastfeeding Module 2- Prenatal Education and Support of Breastfeeding; Anatomy and Physiology of Breastfeeding
Module 3- Positioning, Latch, and Instinctive Feeding Behaviors
Module 4- Breastfeeding in the Immediate Postpartum Period- Opportunities and Challenges
Module 5- Breastfeeding Support and Management of Common Problems in the First Week Postpartum
Module 6- Sore Nipples and Breasts- Etiologies, Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis and Treatment
Module 7- Low Milk Supply and Insufficient Infant Weight Gain- Etiologies, Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis and Treatment
Module 8- Principles of Pharmacology and Substance Management during Breastfeeding
Module 9- Milk Expression, Pump Technology, and Human Milk Storage
Module 10- Symptoms, Evaluation, and Management of Excessive Lactation
Module 11- Methods of Weaning from Breastfeeding, Basic Concepts of Re-lactation, Induced Lactation, and Tandem Nursing

CERPs GOLD Conferences has been designated as a Long Term Provider of CERPs by the IBLCE--Approval #CLT114-07


CMEs - Continuing Medical Education credits for Physicans & Nurses:
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of PESI Inc. and the GOLD Conference Services. PESI, Inc. is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Tags / Categories

Breastfeeding and Lactation

How much time do I have to view the presentations?

  • The viewing time will be specified for each product. When you purchase multiple items in your cart, the viewing time becomes CUMULATIVE. Ex. Lecture 1= 2 weeks and Lecture Pack 2 = 4 Weeks, you will have a total of 6 weeks viewing time for ALL the presentations made in that purchase.
  • Time for viewing the talks begins once you purchase the product. For Live Webinars & Symposiums, the viewing period begins from when the live event takes place. Presentations can be accessed 24/7 and can be viewed as many times as you like during the viewing period.

What are bundled lectures?

  • Presentations may be available individually or via a bundled package. Bundled lectures are a set of lectures that have been put together based on a specific category or topic. Some lectures will be available in both individual and lecture form, whereas others will be available only via a bundled lecture pack.

Will there be Handouts?

  • YES! Each lecture comes with a PDF handout provided by the Speaker.

Some lectures include a Q&A, what does that mean?

  • During our online conferences, presentations that occur live are also followed by a short 15 minute Question & Answer Session. The Speaker addresses questions that were posted by Delegates during the presentation. We include the recording of these Q&A Sessions as a bonus for you.

How can I receive a Certificate?

  • Once you are done viewing the lecture or the lectures within a bundle, submit your attendance record in order to be able to download your certificate.
Start Learning Today!

Professionals that selected this package also viewed

Page   1 of 0