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Breastfeeding Education Online Course(s) & Continuing Education

Access the latest clinical skills and research for Breastfeeding Education for Lactation & Breastfeeding professional training. These Breastfeeding Education online courses provide practice-changing skills and valuable perspectives from leading global experts. This Breastfeeding Education education has been accredited for a variety of CEUs / CERPs and can be accessed on-demand, at your own pace.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A TaNefer L. Camara, MS-HCA, IBCLC

TaNefer is an IBCLC, Maternal Health Strategist and Healer with over 15 years of experience in supporting families through birth, breastfeeding and postpartum. She has a background in psychology and Health education with an emphasis in community health and early career experience in counseling, social services and family advocacy. She brings a wealth of knowledge and experience as she helps her clients identify their challenges and lovingly guides them through a plan to overcome them. She has the ability to work with diverse populations and tailors support to fit the needs of each unique person or group. She educates parents, families and professionals on lactation, breastfeeding and maternal healing. She is also a researcher, serving as a Community Advisory Board member to the UCSF Preterm birth initiative and is also the Community Researcher and Relations consultant to the SACRED Birth Study. She has designed, implemented and evaluated programs in maternal equity and lactation and is the creator of the "Teach me how to breastfeed" song and viral music video. TaNefer Lumukanda Camara is also a Co-founder B.L.A.C.K Course.

U.S.A TaNefer L. Camara, MS-HCA, IBCLC
Abstract:

It’s been a decade since the Surgeon General’s call to action to support breastfeeding. While great strides have been made to improve breastfeeding rates in the US, diverging societal conditions, disparate birth outcomes and changing family dynamics have necessitated adjustment and adaptation of more inclusive and multifaceted approaches to lactation support. With up to 34% of birthing people having experienced a traumatic birth, one study has shown how the effect on breastfeeding can go in either direction. If we factor in housing instability, mental health and race/immigration status we see greater disparities and/or differing needs according to the target population. However, the paradox is that these issues are not mutually exclusive, therefore a one size fits all approach is not sufficient. The COVID-19 Pandemic shed light on pre-existing gaps and disparities in this field and forced us to reimagine what breastfeeding promotion, protection and support should and can be. Implementing a multi-disciplinary plan to approach breastfeeding and lactation should be the trend moving forward. In this presentation you will learn how to:

Identify disciplines that can collaborate with lactation specialists to support breastfeeding promotion. Discuss challenges in supporting populations with multiple needs and high risk. Strategize a plan for reaching marginalized communities and populations at high risk and high need for lactation support.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 0.5 (details)
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Belgium Joke Muyldermans, Midwife, MsC, lactation consultant IBCLC

Joke Muyldermans Graduated as a Midwife in 2006 and graduated as a Master in Midwifery in 2008. She obtained the IBCLC lactation consultant degree in 2011(recertificated in 2016) and graduated in specialized applied pharmacology in 2015. She has a lot of experience as midwife and lactation consultant in primary care, lecturer, head editor, president and treasurer of the Flemish Organisation of Midwives. Since May 2020 she is a board member of ELACTA. Due to a shortage of ready made educational breastfeeding material, she and some collagues have delved into health promotion to adults about breastfeeding. Next to that Joke has a specific interest in nipple problems in the postpartum period.

Belgium Joke Muyldermans, Midwife, MsC, lactation consultant IBCLC
Abstract:

There is a lack of correct, similar and evidence-based information about breastfeeding in primary care and hospital settings. According to mothers, the most difficult thing about breastfeeding are the many contradictory advice. Literature shows there is a clear link between positive breastfeeding figures and the fact that mothers received prenatal education. A lot of research as been done on the effect of prenatal preparation, but not on the quality of information, the used methods and material. Adults learn best with a combination of three methods, explanation, the use of visual material and practical exercises. Ready-made educational packages for giving a prenatal workshop, information session or to be used during the prenatal or postnatal consultation need to meet the needs parents that appears from the literature. A realistic picture of breastfeeding need to be given in a fresh, timeless way. The educational material also need be used during consultations where language is a problem due to its clear images and few words.A variety of material and methods, like pictures and movies, interaction and explanation, need to be done.

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Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Presentations: 8  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE

Christy Jo has over 25 years of teaching experience. She is passionate about teaching in ways that simplify learning. She has been awarded the United States Presidential Volunteer Award for her community service, the Phyllis Klaus Founder's Award for her contribution to the Mother/Baby bond and the Above and Beyond Award for innovative projects that exemplify the mission of Public Health. She has also been named Lactation Educator Faculty of the Year from Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals Association and earned their Visionary Award in 2015. Christy Jo is the author of Mommy Feeds Baby and co-author of Making Milk. She created the Grow Our Own Lactation Consultant/IBCLC Prep Course which has been used to train hundreds of students to become Lactation Consultants. She currently resides in California with her husband and three children. She continues to serve her community as a birth doula, Private Practice IBCLC, Health Educator for Public Health, and faculty for the CAPPA CLE© and Childbirth Educator Programs.

USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Abstract:

Get that idea of creating a prenatal breastfeeding class out of your head and make it a reality! You have wisdom to share, but how do you share it in a way that captures parents’ attention and appeals to different learning styles? In this interactive presentation, I’ll guide you through the process of creating a prenatal breastfeeding class. Join in as we work with tools and handouts that will help you create a prenatal breastfeeding class that meets the goal of setting parents up for breastfeeding success!

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Presentations: 33  |  Hours / CE Credits: 32.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE

Christy Jo has over 25 years of teaching experience. She is passionate about teaching in ways that simplify learning. She has been awarded the United States Presidential Volunteer Award for her community service, the Phyllis Klaus Founder's Award for her contribution to the Mother/Baby bond and the Above and Beyond Award for innovative projects that exemplify the mission of Public Health. She has also been named Lactation Educator Faculty of the Year from Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals Association and earned their Visionary Award in 2015. Christy Jo is the author of Mommy Feeds Baby and co-author of Making Milk. She created the Grow Our Own Lactation Consultant/IBCLC Prep Course which has been used to train hundreds of students to become Lactation Consultants. She currently resides in California with her husband and three children. She continues to serve her community as a birth doula, Private Practice IBCLC, Health Educator for Public Health, and faculty for the CAPPA CLE© and Childbirth Educator Programs.

USA Christy Jo Hendricks, IBCLC, RLC, CLE, CD(DONA), CCCE
Abstract:

This presentation highlights how much of the vocabulary and terms used by professionals can be confusing and intimidating to lay people. The speaker will focus on ways of simplifying birth and breastfeeding through visual instruction and common language. Many teaching suggestions and strategies are given throughout the presentation. We as educators and advocates must learn to translate perinatal terms into words familiar to communities in order to be successful in reaching everyone with the vital message that human milk is important to human babies.

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Presentations: 26  |  Hours / CE Credits: 24.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Mother of 6 breastfed children, Tytina is a Certified Lactation Counselor, La Leche League International Breastfeeding Peer Counselor and Program Administrator. Tytina is a Loving Support WIC Peer Counselor and Rush University Medical Center Mother’s Milk Club peer counselor. She is an International Center for Traditional Childbearing provisional Doula. She has 15 years of community-level maternal child health. Her affiliations include Chicago Region Breastfeeding Taskforce, March of Dimes, National Association of Professional and Peer Lactation Supporters of Color, Breastfeed Chicago, the United States Breastfeeding Committee, and GOLD Learning Professional Advisory Committee.

Abstract:

This talk is to stress the importance of breastfeeding in communities where both finances and breastfeeding rates are low. These communities tend to have the highest infant mortality rates. Breastfeeding support programs are almost nonexistent due to lack of funding. This contributes to low initiation of breastfeeding. In these communities the title lactation consultant is foreign. Breastfeeding Peer Counselors reside within these communities; however, there are no employment opportunities. These are actually environmental barriers as well. Living in a community that does not support lactation, makes infant formula appear to be the “norm” for infant feeding. If the community as a whole was aware of the importance of breastfeeding, the whole village could take a stand. Implementing free breastfeeding/mothering support groups, allowing volunteer peer counselors to come in and assist is one approach. It should not take “money” to provide free breast milk.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Michelle Pensa Branco MPH IBCLC is a lactation consultant and public health advocate. In addition to her clinical practice, which has included in-hospital, outpatient and private practice settings, she advocates for improved maternal-child health practices at the local, national and global level. She has a particular interest in the impact of trauma to breastfeeding families, models of peer support to improve breastfeeding outcomes and the application of health communication principles to the promotion and protection of breastfeeding. Michelle serves as the Director of Peer Support Programs and provides clinical lactation expertise for Nurture Project International, the only international NGO focused exclusively on infant feeding in emergencies. With Jodine Chase, she co-founded a Canadian non-profit organization, SafelyFed Canada. She is also an active member of the Ontario Public Health Association’s Breastfeeding Promotion Working Group. Michelle has previously served as the Vice-Chair of La Leche League Canada, the Communications Director for the Canadian Lactation Consultants Association as well as the Toronto Coordinator of INFACT Canada. When she is not travelling for work, Michelle stays close to home, living with her family just outside Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract:

Within the lactation world, it is widely accepted that optimizing infant feeding practices and normalize breastfeeding, we must frame breastfeeding as the physiological norm and not breastfeeding as the risk behaviour. For example, breastfeeding does not reduce the risk of type II diabetes, but rather not breastfeeding increases the risk of type II diabetes. Most of us have had this framing drilled into us during our training and can deftly turn around any headline to reflect the correct wording.

It is, indeed, scientifically correct that breastfeeding is the physiological norm for human: artificial feeding is no more “normal” for the human baby than using a wheelchair to be mobile. However, health communication is about more than delivering scientifically accurate facts to the target population. In motivating parents to initiate breastfeeding and then maintain exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and alongside complementary foods for at least 2 years and beyond, the science of health behaviour is often overlooked.

In this session, we will discuss some of the major models of health behaviour change and how risk is perceived and acted up on within these models, drawing from both maternal-child health and other public health. We will review the rationale for using risk-based language as well as the evidence for different perspectives, including the use of social marketing strategies.


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Presentations: 3  |  Hours / CE Credits: 3  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Webinar

Words That Work

By Nikki Lee, RN, BSN, MS, IBCLC, CCE, CIMI, ANLC, CKC, RYT
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Nikki Lee, RN, BSN, MS, IBCLC, CCE, CIMI, ANLC, CKC, RYT

Nikki started as an LPN in 1971, got her RN and BSN, and a graduate degree. She is an author, a teacher, a holistic lactation consultant, a craniosacral therapy practitioner, and a baby body worker (teaching Infant Massage and TummyTime! She is mother to 2 wonderful (breastfed for a long time) daughters, wife to 3 interesting men, only one of whom was the right one for the past 37 years, Rafe!

Her publications include the books, Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Breastfeeding Therapy and A Breastfeeding Owner’s Manual; the monographs, “Benefits of Breastfeeding and Their Economic Impact” and “Sexuality and Breastfeeding” and the educational pamphlet “How to help yourself through labor”. She has been the reviews editor for the journal Clinical Lactation, and has worked as the lactation consultant for the division of Maternal, Child, and Family Health at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health since 2006.

U.S.A. Nikki Lee, RN, BSN, MS, IBCLC, CCE, CIMI, ANLC, CKC, RYT
Abstract:

In the past, childbirth educators and breastfeeding helpers have given information that has inadvertently worked against breastfeeding exclusivity and duration. This presentation will address at least 4 common teachings and how they can reinforce perceived milk insufficiency and new mothers’ insecurity about milk supply. Strategies, evidence and scripts will be given to update breastfeeding education.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.