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Neonatology

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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United States Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, MSW

Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, ACSW, has been working in maternal and child health for over 30 years as an educator, researcher, advocate, and writer. She is the immediate past president of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) and the founding director of Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, which provides safe donor milk to hospitals and families throughout the northeastern US. An expert on access to perinatal health care and policies that support breastfeeding, she has been a consultant to the Centers for Disease Control (on a panel that created “The CDC Guide to Breastfeeding Interventions”), to the United States Breastfeeding Committee (developing an issue paper addressed to CEOs and legislators on breastfeeding and the workplace), and to the March of Dimes (developing educational material for women and families who are medically and socially vulnerable to high-risk pregnancy). She also developed a curriculum for hospital personnel about combining breastfeeding with their work. She reviews articles submitted to the Journal of Human Lactation, Breastfeeding Medicine, and other publications related to breastfeeding, milk banking, and access to perinatal child care. As Executive Director of Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, she is thoroughly versed in the technical, procedural, and ethical aspects of milk banking. She often speaks at professional conferences, hospital staff trainings, and grand rounds about milk banking and breastfeeding policies.

United States Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD, MSW
Abstract:

This talk uses research literature and hospital policies and programs to explore ways for families of babies in the NICU to be meaningful and active members of the NICU care team. We will look at a global snapshot of prematurity; define what a team is and who is on the NICU care team; and discuss the short- and long-term goals of the NICU care team, as well as many tools and strategies that team members and the team as a whole have at their disposal to reach those goals. Can be adapted for US or global audiences.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Tinisha Lambeth, DNP, RN, NNP-BC

Dr. Tinisha Lambeth is the Neonatal Quality Improvement Coordinator and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Wake Forest School of Medicine. She coordinates quality improvement at Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center NICU as well. She is a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and received her MSN (2004) & DNP (2014) from Duke University School of Nursing. Over the past 8 years, Tinisha has presented quality improvement work locally, nationally, & internationally. She has co-authored three publications, on the topics of cytomegalovirus, golden hour and the association of different feeding types with necrotizing enterocolitis and growth in premature infants.

USA Tinisha Lambeth, DNP, RN, NNP-BC
Abstract:

Early- and late-onset sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. However, prolonged antibiotic administration alters the microbiome and increases the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and death in very low birth weight infants and in late preterm and term infants adverse effects include ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, increased bacterial resistance, and unnecessary costs. Empiric antibiotic therapy for early-onset sepsis and routine Vancomycin usage for late-onset sepsis was a common practice for neonates at this neonatal intensive care unit. Also, antibiotic stewardship in early- and late-onset sepsis management in the NICU posed unique challenges due to variability in provider practices. In this presentation the Model for Improvement quality improvement methodology and three quality improvement projects with a global aim to reduce antibiotic usage will be presented.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Lori Baas Rubarth, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC

I have been working in the neonatal area for about 40 years. I received my BSN from Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I began working in the NICU right after graduation at Bronson Methodist Hospital in Kalamazoo, MI. I then moved to Detroit and worked at Henry Ford Hospital for 7 years as an RN, Perinatal Educator, Clinical Nurse Specialist, and NNP. I completed my MSN at Wayne State University. I was the first NNP in Michigan, and after leaving Henry Ford, I started working at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Ann Arbor. We moved to Arizona in 1985. I worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center in Phoenix and Banner Desert Medical Center in Mesa (including time at other Banner facilities at Baywood, Mesa Lutheran, and Thunderbird). I completed my PhD at the University of Arizona in Tucson in 2005, and moved to Omaha, NE to begin teaching in the NNP program at Creighton University. I have continued to work most weekends in the NICUs at Methodist Women’s Hospital, Creighton University Medical Center, Lakeside Hospital, and Bergan Mercy Medical Center (CHI Health). I love both teaching and the clinical aspects of the NNP role. I love working with students and helping them “get” the connection between physiology and the disease. I also get a “kick” out of attending deliveries, bagging infants, and intubating them!! I love that adrenaline rush! I also enjoy biking, reading a good novel, and enjoy roller blading (until I broke my leg 4 years ago). I have been pretty cautious with my roller skating since then. I have two sons – one in college and one who recently graduated from college and is working in downtown San Francisco. My husband and I love to travel (when I get time off) and have done some kayaking on the beautiful Nebraska lakes.

USA Lori Baas Rubarth, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC
Abstract:

This talk will discuss the bacteria seen in the NICU and the groups of antibiotics that are used to treat them, differentiating between empiric therapy and directed therapy. The antibiotics covered will be penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, macrolides, carbapenems and vancomycin. Antibiotic resistance patterms and possible new therapies will also be discussed.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Elizabeth Sharpe, DNP, APRN, NNP-BC, VA-BC, FAANP

Dr. Elizabeth Sharpe is a neonatal nurse practitioner and vascular access specialist with over 25 years of experience in Level II and Level III NICUs. She is an Associate Professor Clinical Nursing at The Ohio State University and Specialty Track Director of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Specialty in the Master of Science Graduate Nursing Program. Her unique contributions focus on education, vascular access, simulation, and harm prevention. She is the coauthor of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) Guideline for Practice: Neonatal Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters, 3rd Edition, and has authored numerous publications. Dr. Sharpe has served two terms on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN.org) and currently serves as the NANN liaison to the Council of International Neonatal Nurses. She was honored to be named the 1st Janet Pettit Scholar by the Association for Vascular Access (avainfo.org) and a Fellow of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the National Academies of Practice.

USA Elizabeth Sharpe, DNP, APRN, NNP-BC, VA-BC, FAANP
Abstract:

Our special babies present unique challenges in vascular access. This presentation will highlight different methods of vascular access in neonates and infants including anatomy, therapy and patient characteristics. This will provide baseline information regarding guidelines for proper placement of umbilical catheters, surgically-inserted, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), midline and peripheral intravenous catheter. This is essential to building the knowledge base of new nurses and will update advanced neonatal nurses.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Canada Dr. Souvik Mitra, MD, RCPC (Affiliate)

Dr. Souvik Mitra is an Assistant Professor and neonatologist at the Division of Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. He completed his medical school and pediatric residency from Calcutta Medical College, India. Dr Mitra went on to complete his neonatal fellowship at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada and is currently pursuing his Masters in Clinical Epidemiology from the same institution. Cerebral oxygenation and cardiovascular physiology in premature infants are his primary clinical research interests. He also has extensive epidemiological research experience having published a number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. He has shared his research through webinars across Canada and the United States as well as through platform presentations at various international conferences. He has special expertise in targeted neonatal echocardiography and is a member of the Pan-American Hemodynamics (TnECHO) Collaborative.

Canada Dr. Souvik Mitra, MD, RCPC (Affiliate)
Abstract:

There is increasing evidence that optimizing time spent within targeted oxygen saturation limits improves clinical outcomes in premature infants. Recent randomized clinical trials show that preterm infants who spend more time above the target saturation range tend to have increased retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, while those infants who spend a considerable time below the target range tend to have more necrotizing enterocolitis and death. Hence it is imperative that we find out the best way to optimize oxygen saturation targeting in preterm infants. Education programs followed by implementation of oxygen titration guidelines for the bedside nursing staff have been shown to have some benefit. However, the ever-increasing NICU workload often makes it impossible for nurses to adhere to strict oxygen titration guidelines. Automated control of inspired oxygen may provide some respite to the nurses as this recent technology has not only been shown to reduce nursing workload but also to improve oxygen saturation targeting in preterm infants. This is an exciting new innovation which, with more refinement in technology and practice, has the potential of becoming the standard of NICU care in future.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2018
Hours / Credits: 1.25 (details)
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Dr. Britta Bushnell (she/her) is author of Transformed by Birth, host of the podcast Transformed, veteran childbirth educator, celebrated speaker, mythologist, wife and mother, and specialist in childbirth, relationship, and parenting. For over 20 years, Dr. Bushnell has worked with individuals and couples as they prepare for the life-changing experience of giving birth. Her work with parents has been enriched by her doctoral work in mythology and psychology, her years spent as a co-owner of Birthing From Within, as well as her dedicated study of solution-focused brief therapy, storytelling, and skills for supporting intimate relationships while parenting.

Britta is an engaging teacher, speaker, and presenter. Whether addressing a room of expectant parents, new mothers, or seasoned birth professionals, Britta has a way of captivating and inspiring them all. She has presented at conferences such as DONA International, MANA, ICEA, and Lamaze. Additionally, Britta has been featured on several popular podcasts including Informed Pregnancy, Birthful, and Atomic Moms. In 2016, in recognition of her transformative childbirth classes, Britta was awarded "Educator of the Year" by the Southern California Doula Association (DASC).

Abstract:

Becoming a parent is a process of profound maturation, one that requires expectant parents to grow into decision-makers for their growing families. Teachers and experts in the childbirth and parenting fields naturally want to share their hard-earned wisdom with expectant parents. However, doing so without awareness may be unwittingly reinforcing the idea for new parents, that experts “out there” hold the knowledge needed to be make decisions in the best interest of their growing family. This effectively keeps expectant parents in the energetic position of the child (the one who receives guidance) rather than supporting them to grow into the position of the parent (the one who makes decisions and acts). If we want to help the expectant parents grow into autonomous and self-guided parents, educators must practice in such a way that inspires the growth needed in the parent rather than simply fill them with information. Flipping from the authority of teacher and expert to mentor or guide, reduces the hierarchical nature of the relationship and can help awaken the inner authority of the parent-to-be. Understanding this dynamic along with a few basic tools can help you better support your clients as they stretch into parenthood.

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Presentations: 13  |  Hours / CE Credits: 12.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Italy Alice Farrow, BSc, IBCLC, Cert PPH

Alice Farrow is an IBCLC, writer, speaker, and infant feeding and health equity advocate. Parent of a child born with a cleft lip and palate, Alice has worked extensively, since 2006, with parents, parent organisations, cleft teams health providers and lactation specialists in order to increase awareness of the specific challenges faced by cleft affected infants and their families and to imprve access to adequate lactation support for this community.

Currently based in Rome, Italy, Alice advocates for, and teaches regularly on, the topic of breastfeeding/chestfeeding with an oral cleft via presentations, courses, articles, booklets and handouts and supports parents and professionals wordwide via their Cleft Lip and Palate Breastfeeding website and associated online support group, and in person and distance consultations.


Italy Alice Farrow, BSc, IBCLC, Cert PPH
Abstract:

A common misconception among care providers and families is that babies born with an oral cleft cannot breastfeed/chestfeed. This presentation corrects that misconception by exploring cleft types and their expected breastfeeding/chestfeeding outcomes and sharing tools that lactation specialists can use to more effectively support parents when their baby is born with a cleft lip/palate. In particular, during the neonatal period, the lactation specialist is uniquely positioned to support parents to make informed decisions about their feeding choices and create a going home care plan to help them achieve their breastfeeding/chestfeeding goals in the long term.

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Presentations: 1  |  Hours / CE Credits: 1  |  Viewing Time: 2 Weeks
Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E

Dr Justine Leach is an advocate for trauma-informed care in the perinatal period and co-founder of Resilient Birth, a company which trains healthcare providers and other perinatal professionals in supporting survivors giving birth. She also helps expectant parents with histories of trauma prepare for childbirth through trauma-informed childbirth education classes and birth support planning. Dr Leach became a B.A.C.E. certified childbirth educator and advocate after the birth of her two children revealed the impact of trauma experiences on childbirth. She has a Ph.D. on representations of sexual consent in narratives of rape and sexual trauma, and facilitates the Trauma-Informed Perinatal Professionals facebook group. Justine speaks about the experience of giving birth as a survivor of rape and the important role healthcare providers and perinatal professionals play in a birth giver’s experience of trauma or healing.

U.S.A. Justine Leach, Ph.D., B.C.C.E
Abstract:

Survivors of trauma are at an increased risk not only of experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms during their pregnancy, but also birth trauma and postpartum PTSD. Yet too often survivors’ needs are ignored and traditional childbirth preparation is neither trauma-informed nor supportive of survivors’ emotional experiences. This presentation envisions what childbirth preparation looks like from a trauma-informed perspective. It will explore how to create safety in our relationships with birth givers, how to help survivors feel their power, and how to hold space for their emotional journey to parenthood. I discuss the impact of previous trauma on birth givers in pregnancy and birth, and explore what can be done prenatally to prevent birth trauma. Participants will gain practical skills for supporting survivors’ emotional wellbeing and for helping them to plan for a safe birth experience. This involves rethinking the birth plan. Instead of merely articulating a birth givers’ preferences for or against interventions, a birth plan should be rethought as a Birth Support Plan: that is, it should communicate what a birth giver needs to feel safe, understood, and in control of the decisions they make around their care whether their birth goes to plan or not.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Dr. Joana Torres received her medical degree from the University of Coimbra, Portugal, and completed her fellowship in Gastroenterology at the Hospital Center of Coimbra, Portugal. She spent 3 years at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA working on research projects in the field of IBD. She is currently working in Hospital Beatriz Ângelo, Loures, Portugal as a Gastroenterology Assistant and she is Adjunct Assistant Professor at Mount Sinai, NY. She is the President of the Scientific Committee of the Portuguese IBD Group and an active member of the European Crohn and Colitis Guideline committee (GuiCom). Her research focuses on populations at risk for developing inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of better understanding events taking place before the disease is diagnosed.

Abstract:

Inflammatory Bowel Disease is a chronic immune-mediated disease with increasing epidemiology. IBD results from a complex relationship between genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and intestinal microbiota, resulting in a self-perpetuating abnormal mucosal immune response. Increasing epidemiological evidence suggests that early life events and childhood exposures may be important for determining the risk of IBD. One of the most important early life exposures is diet: breastfeeding (BF) or formula feeding may impact microbiome development, which in turn may modulate immune system maturation. In this presentation I will review the benefits of BF, the evidence suggesting the role of BF in IBD, the impact of BF on the developing microbiome, and debate the issues of breastfeeding in patients with IBD.

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Presentations: 11  |  Hours / CE Credits: 11.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2020
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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Denmark Ragnhild Maastrup, RN, PhD, IBCLC

Clinical nurse researcher in the area of breastfeeding preterm infants and skin-to-skin contact at dept. of Neonatology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet and leader of Knowledge Centre for Breastfeeding Infants with special needs. Member of the Nordic and Quebec Working Group expanding the BFHI for neonatal wards (Neo-BFHI).

Denmark Ragnhild Maastrup, RN, PhD, IBCLC
Abstract:

Breastfeeding of preterm infants is associated with factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice.

Extremely preterm infants establish exclusive breastfeeding at a higher PMA and have twice the risk of not being exclusively breastfed at discharge. Low education, less breastfeeding experience, and smoking are maternal factors negatively associated with exclusive breastfeeding.

Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant immediately after delivery is associated with earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. The later the initiation of breast milk expression, the later the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding, and the higher risk for failure of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge and inadequate breastfeeding duration. The use of a nipple shield is associated with failure of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge and inadequate duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Minimizing the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding establishment and test weighing the infant are positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding at discharge.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2019
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.