Neonates

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Lori Baas Rubarth, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC

I have been working in the neonatal area for about 40 years. I received my BSN from Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I began working in the NICU right after graduation at Bronson Methodist Hospital in Kalamazoo, MI. I then moved to Detroit and worked at Henry Ford Hospital for 7 years as an RN, Perinatal Educator, Clinical Nurse Specialist, and NNP. I completed my MSN at Wayne State University. I was the first NNP in Michigan, and after leaving Henry Ford, I started working at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Ann Arbor. We moved to Arizona in 1985. I worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center in Phoenix and Banner Desert Medical Center in Mesa (including time at other Banner facilities at Baywood, Mesa Lutheran, and Thunderbird). I completed my PhD at the University of Arizona in Tucson in 2005, and moved to Omaha, NE to begin teaching in the NNP program at Creighton University. I have continued to work most weekends in the NICUs at Methodist Women’s Hospital, Creighton University Medical Center, Lakeside Hospital, and Bergan Mercy Medical Center (CHI Health). I love both teaching and the clinical aspects of the NNP role. I love working with students and helping them “get” the connection between physiology and the disease. I also get a “kick” out of attending deliveries, bagging infants, and intubating them!! I love that adrenaline rush! I also enjoy biking, reading a good novel, and enjoy roller blading (until I broke my leg 4 years ago). I have been pretty cautious with my roller skating since then. I have two sons – one in college and one who recently graduated from college and is working in downtown San Francisco. My husband and I love to travel (when I get time off) and have done some kayaking on the beautiful Nebraska lakes.

USA Lori Baas Rubarth, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC
Abstract:

This talk will discuss the bacteria seen in the NICU and the groups of antibiotics that are used to treat them, differentiating between empiric therapy and directed therapy. The antibiotics covered will be penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, macrolides, carbapenems and vancomycin. Antibiotic resistance patterms and possible new therapies will also be discussed.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Jim Thigpen, PharmD, BCPS

Jim Thigpen, PharmD, BCPS, is Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy at East Tennessee State University. He received his B.S. and PharmD degrees from the Medical University of South Carolina. He completed a specialty residency in pediatrics and has served as a pediatric clinical pharmacist for the last 25 years. He has a passion for educating student pharmacists, residents, and clinical team members in all aspects of pediatric pharmacotherapy. He was awarded the Faculty Teaching Award in 2011 and the Outstanding Teacher Award by the classes of 2010, 2011 and 2015. His practice and research interests are broad and include neonatal abstinence syndrome, neonatal sepsis, medications in breastfeeding, among others. He has had the honor of speaking at the Academy of Neonatal Nursing Conference in 2012, 2014 and 2016.

USA Jim Thigpen, PharmD, BCPS
Abstract:

When faced with a potential neonatal infection, it is critical to choose the correct antibiotic(s) for the situation. Considering the environment of antibiotic resistance and some of the limitations for antibiotic use in this fragile population, selecting the right drug, dose, interval and monitoring parameters can be life and death decisions. This presentation will help the learner understand the complexities of this problem and provide them with the tools to provide state-of-the-art medical care.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

Nancy is an attending Neonatologist with San Diego Neonatology, Inc. and is the Medical Director for Sharp HealthCare Lactation Services. She is board-certified in Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and has been an IBCLC since 1988. She is currently secretary/treasurer, education coordinator and web site co-editor for the San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition, which she helped found. Nancy is the Breastfeeding Coordinator for District IX, Chapter 3 of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is a past president of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and on the ILCA and HMBANA Advisory Boards. Her book, “Best Medicine: Human Milk in the NICU” was published in July 2008. She was awarded a 2014 Golden Wave Award by the California Breastfeeding Coalition for her efforts to reduce obstacles to breastfeeding in California. On a personal level, she is the wife of an architect/lawyer, mother of a 23 yr old (formerly breastfed) son, and mother to 4 golden retrievers and 1 cat.

U.S.A. Nancy Wight, MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP
Abstract:

The preferred feeding for all NICU infants is human milk, preferably started on day 1. If mother’s own milk is not immediately available, the clinician should consider the use of heat-treated donor human milk (DHM), which has most of the properties of fresh human milk (immunoglobulins, growth and developmental hormones, enzymes, anti-inflammatory factors, etc.), is sterile, and reduces NEC while improving feeding tolerance. The use of human milk and human milk-derived products has been steadily increasing in world-wide NICUs. In many areas of the USA, it is the standard of care. We will explore the benefits and risks of various donor human milk products, as well as the cost-effectiveness, and challenges for NICUs in using these products.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Ying-Tang Ng, Pharm.D., BCPPS

Ying-Tang Ng is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Husson University School of Pharmacy in Bangor, Maine. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Wingate University School of Pharmacy in Wingate, NC. Post graduation, Dr. Ng completed her pharmacy practice residency at Wolfson Children’s Hospital in Jacksonville, FL and pediatric specialty residency at Texas Tech University School of Pharmacy in Amarillo, TX. Prior to joining Husson University, Dr. Ng practiced at New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington, NC as a clinical pharmacist and at Children’s Hospital of Michigan (CHM) in Detroit, MI as a clinical pharmacy specialist in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). At CHM, Dr. Ng also served as the Post-Graduate-Year (PGY-1) residency coordinator for 1st-year residents. Dr. Ng is a Board Certified Pediatric Pharmacotherapy Specialist. She is currently an active member of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG).

USA Ying-Tang Ng, Pharm.D., BCPPS
Abstract:

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) provides support to neonates with cardiac and/or respiratory failure despite all other conventional management therapies. Neonates on ECMO are management on a variety of medication therapy including anticoagulation and antimicrobial therapy. Due to the nature of the ECMO circuit, pharmacokinetic properties of medications change which can make pharmacotherapy management challenging. Understanding these difference and changes will help maximize medication therapy in this vulnerable population.

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Presentations: 6  |  Hours / CE Credits: 6  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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USA Sue L. Hall, MD, MSW, FAAP

Dr. Sue Hall has been a neonatologist for 25 years, and before that she worked as a master’s level social worker. She has a BA from Stanford University, an MSW from Boston University, and an MD from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She completed training in Pediatrics and Neonatology at The Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, MO, then joined the faculty at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine where she affiliated for 19 years. Now in private practice at a community hospital NICU in Oxnard, California, Dr. Hall was the Co-Chair of the National Perinatal Association’s Workgroup on “Interdisciplinary Recommendations for Psychosocial Support of NICU Parents,” which resulted in publication of a supplement issue of Journal of Perinatology in December, 2015. She is also the author of a book about life in the NICU, titled For the Love of Babies, published in June, 2011.

USA Sue L. Hall, MD, MSW, FAAP
Abstract:

This presentation will cover the evaluation and management of the following conditions commonly seen in newborns at or shortly after birth: Pheumothorax, transient tachypnea of the newborn, sepsis, poor transition, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and cyanotic congenital heart disease. Clinical photographs and reproductions of xrays will assist the participant's ability to recognize these conditions

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
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UK Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc

Dr Embleton has worked in neonatal medicine for the past 25 years, completing clinical training and a research doctorate in neonatal nutrition in the UK, and a neonatal fellowship in Vancouver, Canada. He has worked as a Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician in Newcastle, UK since 2002, one of the largest UK neonatal units, caring for sick preterm and term born neonates. He leads a broad portfolio of research focused on nutrition and gut health in preterm infants. Areas of work include determining patterns of early gut microbial colonization, and how these may predict the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. He is a project team member of large neonatal feeding trials recruiting >5000 infants in the UK, as well as coordinating mechanistic studies using microbiomic and metabolomic analyses. He chairs the multi-disciplinary UK Neonatal Nutrition Network (N3) and is a member of the Committee of Nutrition for ESPGHAN.

UK Nicholas D. Embleton, MD, MBBS, FRCPCH, BSc
Abstract:

Survival in preterm infants has increased over the last few years, and this has been accompanied by an increasing focus on the importance of nutrition and the effects of preterm birth on later outcomes. Providing nutrition to sick preterm infants in the NICU is complex, and almost all preterm infants are discharged with growth outcomes (weight and length) considerably below their birth centiles. This is important because data show an association between poorer growth and nutritional status in the NICU, and worse longterm neurodevelopmental outcomes. Whilst greater efforts are required to improve nutritional status prior to discharge, the post-discharge setting represents a time period when brain growth is also rapid, and where the potential exists to improve outcome through nutritional interventions. However, the potential benefits of improved brain outcomes need to be considered alongside the possibility of metablic harm induced by excessively rapid growth which may increase risks of obesity and later chronic disease. This talk will consider the continued importance of breast milk after discharge, the potential role of fortifiers and supplements in meeting nutrient requirements, and issues around the timing of introduction of complementary foods.

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Presentations: 10  |  Hours / CE Credits: 10.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Available in: Neonatal Conference 2017
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.