Ethics for Lactation Professionals

These presentations deal with common ethical issues that health care providers may face, and ways that health care providers can ensure that they are practicing in an ethical manner and staying within their scope of practice.

Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Cathy Carothers, BLA, IBCLC, FILCA

Cathy Carothers is co-director of Every Mother, a non-profit organization providing lactation training for health professionals. An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant since 1996, she has provided more than 600 training events and conference presentations in every U.S. state/territory and several countries. She is past president of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA), a fellow of ILCA, and past chair of the U.S. Breastfeeding Committee. She chairs the design team for the equity initiative in the lactation consultant profession, and chairs the Monetary Investment for Lactation Consultant Certification (MILCC), which works to reduce financial barriers to the IBCLC exam. She has directed several national breastfeeding promotion and support initiatives for the U.S. federal government, including the national USDA WIC peer counseling program, and national workplace support initiatives through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She was honored with the 2014 National Leadership Award from the National WIC Association.

USA Cathy Carothers, BLA, IBCLC, FILCA
Abstract:

In July 2014, for the first time, stakeholders from 12 countries across the world and major underrepresented communities gathered to explore global barriers that make it difficult to attain the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) credential. Hosted by the three international organizations – IBLCE®, ILCA®, and LEAARC – the Summit contributed to a much larger movement to dismantle inequities within the field. This session will explore how the Summit contributed to this larger movement, how this movement is gaining momentum, and ways in which lactation professionals and organizations can work to reduce inequities. It will also present major findings from the 2014 Lactation Summit. The session is led by Cathy Carothers, chair of the design team for the initiative, and Sherry Payne, the 2014 Lactation Summit facilitator.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC

Marsha is a registered nurse and international board certified lactation consultant. She has been assisting breastfeeding families in hospital, clinic, and home settings since 1976. Marsha is the executive director of the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy: Research, Education, and Legal Branch (NABA REAL). As such, she advocates for breastfeeding at the state and federal levels. She served as a vice president of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) from 1990-1994 and in 1999 as president of ILCA. She is the chair of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition, a board member of the US Lactation Consultant Association, and Baby Friendly USA, USLCA’s representative to the USDA’s Breastfeeding Promotion Consortium, and NABA REAL’s representative to the US Breastfeeding Committee. Marsha is an international speaker, and an author of numerous publications including ones on the hazards of infant formula use, Code issues in the US, and Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence.

USA Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Medical ethics is a foundation of clinical practice. While we all strive to practice in an ethical manner, there are a number of situations and issues that arise which may challenge our ethical principles. This presentation explores the application of medical ethics to clinical lactation practice.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Liz Brooks, JD IBCLC FILCA

Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA -- a lawyer (since 1983) and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in  private practice  (since 1997) --  brings to life the connection between lactation consultation, ethics and the law.
Liz is Secretary of the United States Breastfeeding Committee (2014-16), a Director of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (2015-18), and is a former President (2012-14) and current Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association.  She is active in her Pennsylvania-based professional association and  breastfeeding coalition.    She authored a book, "Legal and Ethical Issues for the IBCLC," the only text devoted to the subject matter, and was lead author in one chapter in each of three other books on similar topics.
With plain language and humor, Liz explains how IBCLCs and other breastfeeding helpers can work ethically and legally. She offers pragmatic tips that can be used immediately in daily practice.

USA Liz Brooks, JD IBCLC FILCA
Abstract:

This presentation is a first of its kind: a "survey course" of legal and ethical tensions unique to the IBCLC. Regardless of one’s other professional licenses or credentials, there are four primary practice-guiding documents for the IBCLC. After a review of those “rules of the road,” we’ll navigate a simple algorithm the IBCLC can use to determine what she could, should or must do, in any situation that sets off ethical red flags in the IBCLC’s mind. Then, we’ll hit highlights of legal and ethical issues for the IBCLC: certification vs. licensure vs. certificates-for-classes-and-courses; who is the patient/client?; conflicts of interest (and tensions from “wearing many hats”); intellectual property law; the (WHO) International Code; the IBCLC in the courtroom (as expert or witness); the IBCLC on the Internet; the IBCLC as breastfeeding advocate, and its corollary: the IBCLC as advocate for a breastfeeding mother.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM

Cynthia Good Mojab, MS Clinical Psychology, is a Clinical Counselor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, author, researcher, and internationally recognized speaker. She is also Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management. As one of a small group of mental health care providers in the world who are also IBCLCs, she has a strong interest in lactational psychology. She is the Director of LifeCircle Counseling and Consulting, LLC where she focuses on perinatal mental health care. She formerly served as Research Associate in the Publications Department of La Leche League International and was on the faculty of Parkland College. She has authored, contributed to, and provided editorial review of numerous publications related to breastfeeding, culture, and psychology. She brings the evidence and insights of psychology and lactation consulting to her presentations to help participants better understand and more effectively respond to the complex psychosocial realities of breastfeeding families living in diverse contexts.

U.S.A. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
Abstract:

Culture is an integral part of all encounters with breastfeeding families—whether the lactation specialist’s and the family’s cultural backgrounds are similar or dissimilar. Cultural competence is explicitly or implicitly mandated or recommended in codes of ethics, position statements, and legislation related to a variety of fields, including those that involve the provision of breastfeeding support. For example, IBCLCs are ethically required to provide culturally appropriate care. In spite of the mandate for cultural competence, there is a dearth of information in the field of breastfeeding support regarding its development. This session reviews the ethical call for the development of cultural competence. Five areas of cultural competence—including cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, encounters, and desire—are presented and contrasted with cultural humility. This session also offers 10 “guideposts” for lactation specialists to explore on the non-linear, lifelong, transformative journey of cultural humility.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD. ACSW

Naomi Bar-Yam, ACSW, Ph.D. has been working in maternal and child health for over 25 years as an educator, researcher and writer, in the US and overseas. Areas of special interest include breastfeeding, milk banking, ethical issues in perinatal health. Naomi is the founding director of the Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, providing safe donor milk to hospitals and families throughout the northeast. She serves on the Board of Directors of Human Milk Banking Association of North America.

USA Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD. ACSW
Abstract:

Today, there are multiple forms of human milk exchange: non profit milk banks; for profit companies selling human milk products; private milk sales; private milk donation. Milk exchange in all its forms raises numerous ethical concerns that we as a society must begin to address: assuring safety of milk for those receiving it; protection of mothers and babies supplying milk; allocating a scarce resource, making this resource less scarce.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD. ACSW

Naomi Bar-Yam, ACSW, Ph.D. has been working in maternal and child health for over 25 years as an educator, researcher and writer, in the US and overseas. Areas of special interest include breastfeeding, milk banking, ethical issues in perinatal health. Naomi is the founding director of the Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, providing safe donor milk to hospitals and families throughout the northeast. She serves on the Board of Directors of Human Milk Banking Association of North America.

USA Naomi Bar-Yam, PhD. ACSW
Abstract:

Today, there are multiple forms of human milk exchange: non profit milk banks; for profit companies selling human milk products; private milk sales; private milk donation. Milk exchange in all its forms raises numerous ethical concerns that we as a society must begin to address: assuring safety of milk for those receiving it; protection of mothers and babies supplying milk; allocating a scarce resource, making this resource less scarce.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25.5  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
CAN Joy Noel-Weiss, RN, IBCLC, PhD

Joy Noel-Weiss is a retired La Leche League Leader, an RN and IBCLC, and  an assistant professor at the School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, in Canada. Her nursing background includes working with families in community and hospital to provide postpartum and breastfeeding support. Professor Noel-Weiss has researched newborn weight loss, self-efficacy and breastfeeding, and ethical dilemmas among lactation consultants. Joy collaborated with Trevor MacDonald to lead a team from community to complete a research study that explored transmasculine individuals experiences with pregnancy, birth, and infant feeding.

CAN Joy Noel-Weiss, RN, IBCLC, PhD
Abstract:

In this session, Professor Noel-Weiss explains and defines bioethics, principles of bioethics, and ethical dilemmas. She presents results from her research study about IBCLCs and ethical dilemmas and uses case studies to demonstrate how to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Maya Vasquez, MS, RN, IBCLC

Maya Vasquez is nurse manager of the Birth Center at San Francisco General Hospital in California.  She previously served as lactation consultant and project manager for the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, and led a multidisciplinary task force to achieve Baby Friendly Certification and re-designation.  She works with a diverse patient population, and enjoys learning about the broad variety of human experience through her clients.   Maya is passionate about reducing health disparities by increasing access to quality care, especially through improved maternity care.  She has three adult children and two grandchildren, and lives with her husband near San Francisco.

USA Maya Vasquez, MS, RN, IBCLC
Abstract:

Cultural humility proposes that health care providers engage in a life-long process of self-reflection and learning in order to better understand the multifaceted identities of their clients. The concept was first described by Tervalon and Murray-Garcia as a reply to the more common concept of cultural competence. Cultural humility suggests that rather than attempting to memorize the myriad practices and beliefs of the many clients, providers to see themselves as students of their patients and allow the patient to guide the provider in creating the best plan of care for each individual. For example, among lactation consultants in the United States there is a commonly held belief that Latino mothers prefer to both breast and bottle feed, leading many lactation consultants to believe that this community will never exclusively breastfeed. This may lead to decreased educational efforts directed at the Latino community, since they may be seen as futile, and may affect the long-term health of vulnerable communities. This presentation will explore the concept of cultural humility, and discuss how lactation consultants may use it to better appreciate the multi-dimensionality of each client’s individual experience.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 27  |  Hours / CE Credits: 25  |  Viewing Time: 8 Weeks
Hours / Credits: 1 (details)
Learn More
USA Liz Brooks, JD IBCLC FILCA

Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA -- a lawyer (since 1983) and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in  private practice  (since 1997) --  brings to life the connection between lactation consultation, ethics and the law.
Liz is Secretary of the United States Breastfeeding Committee (2014-16), a Director of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (2015-18), and is a former President (2012-14) and current Fellow of the International Lactation Consultant Association.  She is active in her Pennsylvania-based professional association and  breastfeeding coalition.    She authored a book, "Legal and Ethical Issues for the IBCLC," the only text devoted to the subject matter, and was lead author in one chapter in each of three other books on similar topics.
With plain language and humor, Liz explains how IBCLCs and other breastfeeding helpers can work ethically and legally. She offers pragmatic tips that can be used immediately in daily practice.

USA Liz Brooks, JD IBCLC FILCA
Abstract:

It's all about the Internet! Families in 2015 want to be connected to their network of families and friends. They use Internet-accessing devices and social media to share news, gather information and seek opinions. If this is where families are ... can an IBCLC (or other healthcare provider) be there, too, without violating long-standing principles of privacy and professional ethics? Can healthcare providers engage in clinical discussion with someone on Facebook, Twitter, a chat room or a website? What about real-time webinars, or static websites, where mothers type in their clinical questions? Is texting ever permissible? Can a clinician post a picture of a client, or ask colleagues on a private listserv about a tricky case? We'll learn how the Internet is used by new families to seek and share information, and the professional risks of "friendly" clinical care by the IBCLC or HCP who joins the conversation.

View Full Presentation Information
Presentations: 5  |  Hours / CE Credits: 5  |  Viewing Time: 4 Weeks
This presentation is currently available through a bundled series of lectures.